History: David William Rowley

The Pasadena Stake called me on a short term Stake Mission after I had already put my place up for sale, I did work at it for a while, though. It was also about this time that we got word that my Grandfather, Davis Peter Davis, had died in Idaho Falls. I wasn’t able to go up to the funeral and I felt bad about that.

We had written to Lillian’s (Lillian Alcorn) Aunt Jeannette (Margaret Jeanette Alcorn) who lived on the outskirts of Gridley, California and she wanted us to move right up there, so we decided to move to Gridley, California. One reason for moving in the first place was that I was temporarily out of work. The Fadel Construction man came for me to go back to work, but I was already loaded up to move.

Aunt Jeannette and her family surely made us welcome. We were living right there with her for several weeks before we finally found a place we could buy. We finally bought the Melissa E. Clement place which was about three miles west of town, through the help of W. J. Shephard, a Gridley real estate man. We made the purchase on September 1, 1948.

Right at first the boys (David Alcorn, Douglas Alcorn, Ralph Alcorn, Clayton Alcorn Rowley) and I and even Marjorie (Marjorie Ann Rowley) and Hugh (Hugh Alcorn Rowley) picked fruit together, but we didn’t do so well. I think one good fruit picker could have picked more than the bunch of us put together. We really tried awful hard to pick fast and well, it just didn’t work out so well. We picked for a month or so and then the picking was over for the year. Hugh fell out of a tree and broke his arm which added to our disillusionment about being fruit pickers!

Then I got a job up in Oroville Canyon with the Morrison Knudson Construction Company. We were building the Cresta Dam and I worked for them all winter until the following summer. Then I got a job with The Fife and Stoddard Construction Company and worked for them all the time we lived in Gridley. In Gridley we had a good garden, some fruit trees and some chickens and it seemed more like home.

On Thanksgiving day 1948, Marjorie complained of a sore throat. It turned out to be diphtheria. The family was quarantined and I boarded with the neighbors so I could keep working. It didn’t go through the family, but the quarantine lasted three months. Before it was over Marjorie and Hugh had to have their tonsils out. It was quite an experience for our family. I remember looking in the doorway at Christmas and watching the children enjoying their toys. It was really hard not to be able to come in and enjoy them with my family.

David had been discharged from the Navy and had come home and started back to school. He and Douglas and Ralph boarded with neighbors on the other side of us during the time the family was in quarantine.

On the 7th of June 1949, Grace (Grace Harriet Rowley) had a baby girl. They named her Cheryl (Cheryl Jeanette Smither), we now had a grandchild! Just after this Don (Donald Eugene Smith) enlisted in the Army. Since Don seemed to like it David decided to enlist in the Army, too. They were in the same outfit for quite a while.

To be continued on May 24th

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How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandfather: Evan Jeremy – 764
Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandmother: Eleanor Davis – 765
Eleanor 765 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: David Peter Jeremy – 766
David Peter 766 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: George Jeremy – 767
George 767 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: Thomas Jeremy – 768
Thomas 768 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Mary Ann Jeremy – 769
Mary Ann 769 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandmother: Charlotte Nott Jeremy – 421
Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: Thomas Jeremy – 770
Thomas 770 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: John Jeremy – 771
John 771 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: Peter Jeremy – 772
Peter 772 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Maria Jeremy – 773
Maria 773 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: ‘Daughter’ Jeremy – 774
‘Daughter’ 774 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: George Jeremy – 775
George 775 + Evan 764 – Charlotte Nott 421 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandfather: William Davis – 755
William 755 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandmother: Mary Samuel – 756
Mary 756 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: Roger William Davis – 757
Roger William 757 + William 755 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: Rees William Davis – 758
Rees William 758 + William 755 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Mary Davis – 759
Mary 759 + William 755 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Eleanor Davis – 760
Eleanor 760 + William 755 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Annah Davis – 761
Annah 761 + William 755 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandfather: David William Davis – 420
David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: William William Davis – 762
William William 762 + William 755 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Margaret Davis – 763
Margaret 763 + William 755 – David William 420 – David Peter 207 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

Journal: Grace Harriet Rowley

Grace’s History written by her:

I was born on September 20th, 1928 in Harlem, Blaine County, Montana. My parents are David William and Lillian Alcorn Rowley. I am the oldest of nine children.

Some of my early memories are that we lived in the same house as Grandpa Hugh Thompson Rowley and Grandma Grace Davis Rowley. Uncle Francis (Hugh Francis Rowley) and Aunt Erma (Erma Thornton), his wife also lived with us, it was a two-room home, and one room was the bedroom and the other the kitchen and dining area. It was a crowded but a happy home.

When we got our own home Daddy put a basement foundation in and then the house was put on top. It had two bedrooms upstairs, Margie (Marjorie Ann Rowley) and I shared one and Mom and Dad had the other one it was divided by a thin curtain instead of a door. I remember Daddy staying up at night reading, Daddy always loved to read. The boys slept downstairs. I was about years old when we moved into this house.

One time when it was about Halloween I remember that the boys were playing out in the wheat field. Daddy didn’t like the boys trampling the wheat so he went out and started to make scary noises and it scared the boys so bad that they ran into the house. Doug (Douglas Alcorn Rowley) lost one of his shoes. We knew later that it was Daddy because when he told the story he was crying and Daddy could never tell a funny story without crying.

When I was about thirteen, Daddy found a rattlesnake by the barn door. He picked it up by its tail and broke its neck. Snakes usually travel in pairs and a few days later he found its companion.

Grace Davis Rowley, my Grandmother had long black shiny hair which she wore in braids. When I was young I thought she was an Indian. Whenever David (David Alcorn Rowley) and I did something wrong we would go out and get a willow and take it to Grandma. She would laugh so hard that she wouldn’t spank us.

Grandpa Hugh Thompson Rowley was a very gentle man and he was very good with kids. One time when Grandpa was in Butte, Montana he heard a young lady calling for help. A man was attacking her. When Grandpa went to help her, the man hit him right below his eye, which was always red. Later they did surgery on his eye because he had cancer in that spot.

In 1945, I met Great Grandpa David Peter Davis. I only remember that he was really old. He had white hair and a long beard.

Grandpa Clark Alcorn, was a produce trucker. Sometimes he would bring us fruit so that we canned for the winter.

History: David William Rowley

A GREAT FISHING TRIP

One Spring we heard that the trout were running in Camas Creek, Idaho. This was before it dumped into Market Lake, which later became stocked with catfish, and the trout disappeared, Francis (Hugh Francis Rowley) and I were still small, or I should say young and we slept most of the way over there. We got there a little after daylight and unhitched the horses. We fixed up our fishing tackle. Dad (Hugh Thompson Rowley) helped Francis with his line and pole and Dad’s nephew, Hugh Galloway, helped me with mine. Francis walked over and threw his baited hook and line in while Dad was still fixing his own line and wham! He got a bite! The fish was pulling him into the creek. Dad went and helped Francis land the fish and it was over a five pounder.

When Hugh got my line ready I threw it in and I got a bite just as quickly as Francis. And lo and behold the fish started to pull me in just as the other one did Francis. So Hugh had to help me get the fish out. It was a big one too. We cooked and ate some after a while. We fished most of the day. About 4 o’clock we decided we had better start for home. We had been putting the fish on a big canvas, but when Dad and Hugh went to lift it into the buggy they couldn’t get it off the ground and they were both good sized men. We had to unload a lot of fish, put the canvas in, and then load the rest of the fish back in to the canvas. The folks salted a lot of the fish down in order to keep them. We had no freezers in those days, nor pressure cookers or such.

In 1912 Dad homesteaded up on Meadow and Willow Creek and he farmed this land up into the 1920’s. It was here that the most exciting experiences of my boyhood took place and I have since taken sentimental journeys back there. It is wonderful to see the old country again from time to time.

We only lived there part of the time at first and sometimes Francis and I would be left there to look after things when the folks would go. Francis got to be a pretty good cook. We sure did like Sego milk straight out of the can on our cooked mush and canned fruit and other things. I still like it that way at age 73.

We hadn’t been there long until Mother (Grace Davis) began to miss things out of her purse. One day we saw a pack rat going under the house. We looked and found his nest under the small porch and sure enough there were all the things that had been missing. The men killed the rat.

We farmed the forty acres of Grandfather Davis’ (David Peter Davis) place in the valley and the dry farm too, for several years. Finally we moved to the dry farm to stay. Several families had moved up there and there was a one room log cabin that was used as a school. Dad was one of the trustees of the school along with Stanley Bybee. The school room was so small that there was room for only one long table down the middle. In the center of the table a partition had been built about 2 feet high so the students couldn’t see the work of the ones on the other side. We sat on long benches on each side of the table. The blackboard was along one side. Our teacher would read to us from books.

To be continued…

History: David William Rowley

CONTACT WITH BEES

When we were living on the David Peter Davis (my grandfather’s) place, Dad (Hugh Thompson Rowley) had a straw shed for the horses. One day I was in there looking up at a large wasp nest. All of the sudden one came out and made a bee-line and hit me right between the eyes – it hit so hard it seemed like it almost knocked me down. Boy did that hurt. Another time I was just watching a bee hive and got stung. My Dad teased me about trying to see the Queen Bee!!

Idaho above the forks of Willow Creek and Meadow Creek. It was about this time that we moved up there in the summers and raised wheat.

To be continued…

History: David William Rowley

Having my mouth and throat burned so badly affected my speech for years. Trying to say my name, “Willie Rowley” was especially difficult. I couldn’t pronounce my l’s and r’s and even grownups, who should have known better, would reportedly ask me my name and then snicker behind their hands when I would try to say it. I got so I would walk around several blocks to avoid anyone who might speak to me. I think this had a great deal to do with making me shy and caused me to have a poor self-image. I have often thought what a help it would have been if my family had started calling me David then, as it was so much easier for me to say than Willie.

When I was in my early teens I practiced in front of a mirror until I was able to speak more plainly.

I was still quite small when my father moved back on the David Peter Davis homestead and farmed it for Grandfather David Peter Davis. We were probably living here when Dad (Hugh Thompson Rowley) bought a new pair of shoes for both Francis (Hugh Francis Rowley) and me, telling us not to get in the water with them. When he returned from town he found us wading in the creek in our new shoes. Needless to say we got a tanning that neither of us ever forgot.

While living near Rigby, a beautiful, brown-eyed, curly brown haired boy joined our family, my brother, Emerson Adis. He was born on 4 September 1909. He was blessed in the Milo Ward where we attended church. He was so cute and had my mother’s (Grace Davis) eyes and as a result he could do wrong as far as Dad was concerned. I suppose my nose was out of joint, as they say, but it seemed like it was this way in all the years we lived at home.

Emerson had the brown eyes, but with Dad having ash blonde hair. I guess it was impossible for any of us children to inherit our mothers blue-black hair. A few years ago one of my Coles cousins told me that what she remembered about her Aunt Grace (my mother) was watching her brush her lovely black hair. She said mother’s hair was very long and black. Blue sparks would flash from her hair as she brushed it. We three older children had blue eyes and light hair that later turned brown.

Just two years later my mother gave birth to another sweet baby boy. He was named Walter Ilith. He was born on 8 December 1911 at Idaho Falls, Idaho. He also had brown eyes, but a much quieter disposition than Emerson. Our Dad was working on the dam at Idaho Falls when the baby, Walter, got the whooping cough and we almost lost him.

In our growing up years I always felt protective toward Walter and we have loved each other very much all through the years.

To be continued…