Updates

Changed John Right (Wright) – 732 to John Right (Wright) – 929
Changed Mrs. Mary Right (Wright) – 733 to Mrs. Mary Right (Wright) – 930
Changed Aaron Sperry – 942 to Aaron Sperry – 944
Changed Abigail Bishop – 943 to Abigail Bishop – 945
Changed Dinah Sperry – 738 to Dinah Sperry – 946
Changed Phebe Sperry – 950 to Phebe Sperry – 952
Changed Elijah Sperry – 951 to Elijah Sperry – 953
Changed Hugh Miller – 753 to Hugh Miller – 976
Changed Mary Rogers – 753 to Mary Rogers – 977
Changed Hannah Miller – 755 to Hannah Miller – 978
Changed Jacob Miller – 756 to Jacob Miller – 979
Changed Mary Miller – 757 to Mary Miller – 980
Changed Catherine Miller – 758 to Catherine Miller – 981
Changed James Miller – 759 to James Miller – 982
Changed Daniel Miller – 760 to Daniel Miller – 983
Changed Amy Miller – 761 to Amy Miller – 984
Changed Ruth Miller – 762 to Ruth Miller – 985
Changed Ann Purnell – 801 to Ann Purnell – 1041
Changed Joseph Packer – 802 to Joseph Packer – 1051
Changed Elizabeth Nelms – 803 to Elizabeth Nelms – 1052
Changed John Curnock, Jr. – 804 to John Curnock, Jr. – 1057
Changed Hester Mallett – 805 to Hester Mallett – 1058
Changed Alexander Corbett – 973 to Alexander Corbett – 1606
Changed Iain Alexander Malcolm Ash Corbett – 975 to Iain Alexander Malcolm Ash Corbett – 1608
Changed Hali Ann Fifield – 976 to Hali Ann Fifield – 1609
Changed Mason Dennis Lunt – 978 to Mason Dennis Lunt – 1611
Changed Bailey Ann Lunt – 979 to Bailey Ann Lunt – 1612
Changed Norma Rachel Law – 981 to Norma Rachel Law – 1614
Changed Douglas Jones Birk – 989 to Douglas Jones Birk – 1622
Changed Brooke Tara Birk – 992 to Brooke Tara Birk – 1625
Changed Aleene Sumsion – 1039 to Aleene Sumsion – 1671

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 16, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Caroline Webb – 47
  • Emma Elizabeth Webb – 133

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 16. 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 16, 2018

Changed birth information for Rachel Taft to Happy Birthday!

Added Categories:

  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Josiah H. Miller – 234
  • Amanda Morgan – 285
  • Elizabeth Nelms – 1052
  • Daniel Packer – 1055
  • Joseph Packer – 1051
  • Arabella Sperry – 502
  • Clarendon, Orleans, New York, United States
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Happy Birthday

This Day In Our Family History; April 17, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Harriet Ann Rowley – 199
  • Harriet Wood – 101
  • Shelley, Bingham, Idaho, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 17, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 17, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Larry Lunt Gabbitas – 1654
  • Benjamin Harper – 315
  • Abigail Jones – 535
  • Abigail Morgan – 539
  • Daniel Morgan, Jr. – 534
  • Elizabeth Phipps – 596
  • Harriet Ann Rowley – 199
  • Elizabeth Venables – 316
  • Harriet Wood – 101
  • Shelley, Bingham, Idaho, United States
  • Essex, Chittenden, Vermont, United States
  • PROVO – Provo Utah Temple; Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

This Day In Our Family History; April 18, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • This Day In Our Family History
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 18, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Charles Alonzo Sperry – 48
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Emma Della Sperry – 54
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 18, 2018

Added Categories:

  • John Samuel Harper – 160
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Married On This Day

This Day In Our Family History; April 19, 2017

Changed wording from” “Nephi Lunt was endowed” to “Nephi Lunt completed his endowment ordinance…”

Deleted Italics

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 19, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • David Webb – 129
  • Emma Elizabeth Webb – 133

This Day In Our Family History; April 19, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Abraham Brand – 585
  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 154
  • Margaret Francis – 586
  • Ann Elizabeth Harper – 157
  • Benjamin Harper – 153
  • David Webb – 129
  • London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 20, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Ruth Sperry – 57
  • Caroline Webb – 47

This Day In Our Family History; April 20, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Abraham Lee Harper – 73
  • Mary Lamont – 27
  • Elizabeth Ann Lunt – 42
  • John (Wesley) Sperry – 276
  • Joy Sperry – 274
  • Nathan Sperry – 947
  • William Lamont Sperry – 281
  • Preston, Lancashire, England, United Kingdom
  • San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
  • East Bloomfield, Ontario, New York, United States
  • Loudon, Ashland, Ohio, United States
  • Utah, United States
  • American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States
  • Endowed On This Day

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 20, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Caroline Webb – 47
  • David Webb – 129
  • Emma Elizabeth Webb – 133

This Day In Our Family History; April 20, 2018

Changed birth information for Calvin Marc Lunt to Happy Birthday!

  • Charles Howard Grace – 1704
  • Della Grace – 1707
  • Abraham Lee Harper – 73
  • Darlene Lunt Holman – 1646
  • Mary Lamont – 275
  • Calvin Marc Lunt – 1610
  • Elizabeth Ann Lunt – 42
  • John Sperry – 276
  • Joy Sperry – 274
  • Nathan Sperry – 947
  • William Lamont Sperry – 281
  • Preston, Lancashire, England, United Kingdom
  • Placentia, Orange, California, United States
  • San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
  • East Bloomfield, Ontario, California, United States
  • Loudin, Ashland, Ohio, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 21, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 21, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Jeanette Sperry – 18

This Day In Our Family History; April 21, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Anna Anderson – 148
  • Abraham Brand – 320
  • John Phipps Brand – 323
  • Mary Elizabeth Harper – 159
  • Marie Lunt – 1731
  • Elsa Nelson – 59
  • Neils Nelson – 147
  • Ann Phipps – 321
  • Efveröd, Kristianstad, Sweden
  • Soham, Cambridgeshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Beazer, Cardston, Alberta, Canada

This Day In Our Family History; April 22, 2017

Deleted death information David Webb

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Margaret Jeanette Alcorn – 224
  • Aleene Sumsion – 1671
  • Gridley, Butte, California, United States
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Heber City, Wasatch, Utah, United States

Deleted Category:

  • 1938

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 22, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Mary Emily Sperry – 121
  • David Webb – 129

This Day In Our Family History; April 22, 2018

Deleted death information for Davie Webb

Deleted Rebeckah Brand from sealing information, I found no evidence of relation

Fixed spelling Glouxestershire to Gloucestershire

Added Categories:

  • Margaret Jeanette Alcorn – 224
  • Abraham Brand – 320
  • Abraham Phipps Brand – 326
  • Ann Phipps Brand – 322
  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 154
  • John Phipps Brand – 323
  • Martha Phipps Brand – 325
  • Rachel Phipps Brand – 324
  • Mary Curnock – 299
  • Alfred Lunt – 40
  • Eugene Lunt – 1725
  • Shedrick James Lunt – 43
  • Elizabeth Nelms – 1052
  • Samuel Olpin – 298
  • Joseph Packer – 1051
  • Ann Phipps – 321
  • Priscilla Pitt – 41
  • Aleene Sumsion – 1671
  • David Webb – 129
  • Dursley, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Gridley, Butte, California, United States
  • Utah, United States
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • PROVO – Provo Utah Temple; Provo, Utah, Utah, United States
  • Sealed to Spouse On This Day
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This Day In Our Family History

1788

Abigail Morgan was born in Essex, Chittenden, Vermont, United States to Daniel Morgan, Jr. and Abigail Jones. She was the 8th of 8 children, and the 6th of 6 daughters born to the couple

1808

Edward Leach and Elizabeth Phipps were married

1851

Harriet Wood was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1952

Harriet Ann Rowley died in Shelley, Bingham, Idaho, United States

1958

Larry Eugene Gabbitas was born in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States to Larry Lunt Gabbitas

1978

Benjamin Harper and Elizabeth Venables were sealed for time and eternity in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints’ Provo Utah Temple, which was located at 2200 Temple Hill Drive in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

History: David William Rowley

A GREAT FISHING TRIP

One Spring we heard that the trout were running in Camas Creek, Idaho. This was before it dumped into Market Lake, which later became stocked with catfish, and the trout disappeared, Francis (Hugh Francis Rowley) and I were still small, or I should say young and we slept most of the way over there. We got there a little after daylight and unhitched the horses. We fixed up our fishing tackle. Dad (Hugh Thompson Rowley) helped Francis with his line and pole and Dad’s nephew, Hugh Galloway, helped me with mine. Francis walked over and threw his baited hook and line in while Dad was still fixing his own line and wham! He got a bite! The fish was pulling him into the creek. Dad went and helped Francis land the fish and it was over a five pounder.

When Hugh got my line ready I threw it in and I got a bite just as quickly as Francis. And lo and behold the fish started to pull me in just as the other one did Francis. So Hugh had to help me get the fish out. It was a big one too. We cooked and ate some after a while. We fished most of the day. About 4 o’clock we decided we had better start for home. We had been putting the fish on a big canvas, but when Dad and Hugh went to lift it into the buggy they couldn’t get it off the ground and they were both good sized men. We had to unload a lot of fish, put the canvas in, and then load the rest of the fish back in to the canvas. The folks salted a lot of the fish down in order to keep them. We had no freezers in those days, nor pressure cookers or such.

In 1912 Dad homesteaded up on Meadow and Willow Creek and he farmed this land up into the 1920’s. It was here that the most exciting experiences of my boyhood took place and I have since taken sentimental journeys back there. It is wonderful to see the old country again from time to time.

We only lived there part of the time at first and sometimes Francis and I would be left there to look after things when the folks would go. Francis got to be a pretty good cook. We sure did like Sego milk straight out of the can on our cooked mush and canned fruit and other things. I still like it that way at age 73.

We hadn’t been there long until Mother (Grace Davis) began to miss things out of her purse. One day we saw a pack rat going under the house. We looked and found his nest under the small porch and sure enough there were all the things that had been missing. The men killed the rat.

We farmed the forty acres of Grandfather Davis’ (David Peter Davis) place in the valley and the dry farm too, for several years. Finally we moved to the dry farm to stay. Several families had moved up there and there was a one room log cabin that was used as a school. Dad was one of the trustees of the school along with Stanley Bybee. The school room was so small that there was room for only one long table down the middle. In the center of the table a partition had been built about 2 feet high so the students couldn’t see the work of the ones on the other side. We sat on long benches on each side of the table. The blackboard was along one side. Our teacher would read to us from books.

To be continued…

History: Grace Davis

Grace was simple, plain, and cheerful in her living and manners — she was generous, hospitable and kind in her nature — a true and devoted wife and Latter-Day Saint. She and Hugh Thompson loved each other very much and showed it in many endearing ways that gave their children a feeling of security such as many children never know. These worthy parents tried very hard to teach their children the importance of obedience in their lives and respect for the rights of others. Grace taught her children by example rather than by precept alone, and her example was fine and noble. She always expressed the desire that all her children would live good lives, go on missions, be honest, honorable and upright. She was never heard to use profanity of any kind, nor tell an off-color story or joke. Her children always tried to follow in her footsteps and tried to have been as worthy an example as she.

Grace never had much of this world’s goods, yet she left a heritage greater than any worldly wealth — a knowledge that this is the divine Gospel of Jesus Christ and a desire to serve Him!

OUR GOOD OLD FASHIONED MOTHER
By S. T. Perry

They brought home the portrait last night to me;
On the parlor wall it is hung.
I gave to the artist a picture small,
Which was taken when she was young.
It’s true to life; and there’s a look in the eyes,
I never saw in another.
And the same sweet smile that she always wore.
‘Tis my good, old fashioned Mother.

The hair in the picture is wavy and dark.
‘Twas taken before she was gray.
And the same short curls at the side hang down,
For she always wore it that way.
Her hand on the Bible, easily rests.
As when with my sisters and brothers,
I knelt at her knee, reciting my verse,
To my good old fashioned Mother.

Her dress, it is plain and quite out of style.
Not a puff or ruffle is there.
And no jewels or gold glitter and shine,
She never had any to wear.
Ambition for wealth, or love of display,
We could not even discover,
For poor in spirit and humble in heart,
Was my good old fashioned Mother.

Her life was crowded with work and with care,
How did she accomplish it all?
I do not remember she ever complained,
And yet she was slender and small.
Motives of live that were selfish or wrong,
With Christian grace did she smother.
She lived for her God and the loved ones at home.
My true, good, old fashioned Mother.

The years if her life were only three score,
When the messenger whispered low,
“The Master has come and called for thee”
She answered, “I’m ready to go.”
I gaze alone on her portrait tonight.
And more than ever I love her.
And thank the Lord that he gave to me
Such a good, old fashioned Mother.

Martin Luther has said:

“When Eve was brought unto Adam, he became
filled with the Holy Spirit and gave her the
most sanctified, the most glorious appellations.
He called her Eve. That I smother. He did not call
her wife, but simply Mother — Mother of all
living creatures. In this consists the glory and most
precious ornament of women.”

President David O. McKay tells us:

“Motherhood is the greatest potential influence either for
good or ill in human life. The mother’s image is the first
that stamps itself on the unwritten page of a young
child’s mind. It is her caress that first realization of affection;
her sympathy and tenderness, the first assurance that
there is love in the world. True, there comes a time when
Father takes his place as exemplar and hero of the growing
boy and in the latter’s budding ambition to develop manly traits,
he outwardly seems to turn from the more gentle and
tender virtues engendered by his mother. Yet that
ever-directing and restraining influence implanted during that
first years of his childhood linger with him and permeate
his thoughts and memory as distinctively as perfume
clings to each particular flower.

“In more than one instance in his life of fiery youth, this
lingering influence has proved a safeguard in the hour
of temptation — an influence greater in its restraining power
than the threat of the law of the land, the ostracism of
society, or the fear of violating a command of God. In a
moment of youthful recklessness the youth might defy one
or all of these forces, and so what his hot-blood bade, but
at the critical moment, the flash of a mother’s confiding
trust, the realization of her sorrow if he fail to be true to
it have given him power to refrain from indulgence that
might blight his entire career.”

-The End-

History: Grace Davis

David William married Lillian Alcorn in Chinook on 14 July 1927. They were married by the Branch President, W.B. Peterson.

In November 1928, one of Grace’s cherished dreams came true when Verda May, her only daughter, received a call to go on a mission. Her heart sank, however, when she found out that Verda May had been called to the Central States — which included the South. She had had a friend who had gone to the South, contracted Malaria fever and had suffered the rest of her life from it. Verda May finally convinced her that she’d be all right. Verda May’s faith was such that she knew she’d be all right as her call had come through inspiration and the Central States was where she was needed. Grace, however, was never entirely convinced until Verda May came home again — as well as when she left.

Shortly after her return from her mission of twenty months, Verda May started going with Bert Lund Murphy, who also had just returned from a mission to the North Central States Mission. They were married 17 December 1930 in the Alberta Temple at Cardston, Canada, by President Edward J. Wood. On 13 October 1935, they were set apart as Presidents of the MIA and served until 6 April 1941, when Bert Lund was set apart as the Branch President of the Harlem Branch.

On 21 December 1933, Emerson Adis, Hugh Thompson, and Grace left Montana for Idaho Falls. This trip was always thought of as taking a honeymoon, as they never had one. They arrived in Idaho Falls on the 22 or 23 of December. Emerson Adis let Hugh Thompson and Grace take his car and he stayed in Idaho Falls. As Emerson Adis recalls, his folks truly acted like newlyweds. As he thinks back over the years, this occasion has always given Emerson Adis a glow of satisfaction and a good feeling, as it was the only time that Hugh Thompson and Grace were able to get away together for any length of time and enjoy themselves, free from worries of making a living.

Emerson Adis married Sarah Marie Alderson, 19 August 1934 in Chinook, Montana. She was the daughter of Authur Alderson and Gladys Violet Demon.

Grace’s health kept getting worse and finally the doctor told Hugh Thompson that she needed an operation for the goiter, and that she didn’t want it done in Montana and if she wanted to go to Idaho, for him to let her go. So about the middle of February 1935, Hugh Thompson, Walter Ilith, and Verda May took her by car to Idaho Falls. She lay in the hotel room for about two weeks while the doctor waited for her to rest and get ready for the operation. On the last day of February, she was operated on while Walter Ilith and Verda May were sent to Shelley, Idaho to get Hugh Thompson’s sister, Annie (Harriet Ann ‘Annie’ Rowley). After the operation, she had to have a second one for she began bleeding internally. Her strength was not sufficient to stand this strain and she passed away at 9:00 am the morning of 1 March 1935, which was Aunt Annie’s Birthday.

Funeral services were held at the Wood’s Mortuary. Grace had always wanted to be among her friends and relatives in Idaho. Montana was never really her home. A large crowd came to show their love and respect for her at the services. Her body was held and interred in the Harlem Cemetery, Plot 16.

To be continued…

History: Grace Davis

A near tragedy happened when little David William was about two years old. Grace was preparing to wash and Hugh Thompson was at work at the Sugar Factory. Grace had just finished diluting some lye to put in the boiler for boiling the clothes. She left the lye in a cup on the table and turned back to the stove. David William reached up on the table and took the cup, thinking it contained milk; he drank its contents all down. His screams caused his mother’s heart to about stop beating as she turned around and realized what had happened. She grabbed the vinegar and poured it down the little lad and sent for the doctor. They didn’t have telephones then, so it was awhile before he got there. She told him what she had done and he said it was the worst possible thing she could have done and her heart was filled with fear. He told her that she should have used olive oil instead of vinegar. She got in touch with Hugh Thompson at the factory and he came and they took David William to another doctor. The second doctor told them they had done the right thing, the only thing that could have saved David William’s life. Had she reached for the olive oil instead of the vinegar, the mix of oil and lye would have made a kind of soap and the lather would have choked the boy to death.

David William’s throat was burned so badly that he was unable to eat solids for weeks. He could take nothing but liquids. One day he decided to try some meat, but it got only half way down and lodged, it could go neither up nor down. The piece of meat stayed lodged in his throat for three long weeks during which he was slowly starving to death. One day, while sitting on his Grandmother Rowley’s (Jane Paul)  knee, he asked for some jelly. When David William swallowed the jelly, it provided a slick enough surface for the meat to become dislodged and slide down. David William looked at his grandmother, a look of surprise and joy on his little face as he said, “Damma, its don, Damma, its don!” Everyone present shed tears of gratitude for the life-saving jelly.

It was here at Sugar City that their third child was born, 25 March 1906. She was a beautiful girl they named Verda May. They loved their children very much and took great pains to provide for them the loving care they needed.

Three weeks after her birth, Hugh Thompson went to Butte, Montana to find work. He found a job in the coal mine, so Grace had to move again. They weren’t very happy there, as Butte was a typical mining town–people of every nationality, good and bad. They did not like the environment their boys were exposed to, and decided it was too rough, so they moved back to Idaho.

They moved back to David Peter’s old ranch, and it was here that another little son came to bless their humble lives. On 4 September 1909, a little dark-eyed, curly-haired boy was born. He was named Emerson Adis. Mrs. Josephine Newman from Shelton was the midwife who took care of Grace.

In 1910, Hugh Thompson moved again just in time for David William and Hugh Francis to start school at the Central School. This move took them to Idaho Falls where Hugh Thompson found work on the power dam. Then on 8 December 1911, another little bundle from Heaven came to their home. He was blessed and named Walter Ilith. (Annie (Harriet Ann) Rowley Galloway, Hugh’s sister, was responsible for the name “Ilith.” The family often wondered where she got the name, but in tracing their genealogy back two or three generations they found the name.)

To be continued…

History: Grace Davis

History of Grace Davis

Bert Lund Murphy – Son-in-Law (Husband of Verda May)
Caroline Ann Coles (208) – Mother
Charlotte Davis (214) – Sister
Charlotte Nott Jeremy (421) – Paternal Grandmother
David Peter Davis (207) – Father
David Peter Davis II – Half Brother
David Reuben Davis; Reuben (212) – Brother
David William Davis (420) – Paternal Grandfather
David William Rowley (30) – Son
Effie Cornelia Fowler – Stepmother
Ellen Jane Davis (423) – Paternal Aunt
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Son
Erma Thornton – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of Hugh Francis)
Evan Davis (215) – Brother
Grace Davis (86) – Self
Hannah Davis (210) – Sister
Hannah Terrill (429) – Maternal Grandmother
Harriet ‘Annie’ Rowley (199) – Sister-in-Law (Sister of Husband, Hugh Thompson Rowley)
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Son
Hugh Galloway – Nephew (Son of husbands sister, Harriet Ann Rowley)
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Husband
Jane Paul (198) – Mother-in-Law
Laura Greene – Stepsister
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of David William)
Mary Ann Davis (422) – Paternal Aunt
Mary Leah McGary – Wife of Nephew Hugh Galloway
Naina DeEsta Davis – Half Sister
Parley Davis (209) – Brother
Parley J. Davis – Paternal Uncle (?)
Pearl Greene – Stepsister
Polly Davis (216) – Sister
Reuben Coles (428) – Maternal Grandfather
Ruby Greene – Stepsister
Sarah Marie Alderson – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of Emerson Adis)
Son Davis (211) – Brother
Son Davis (213) – Brother
Verda May Rowley (88) – Daughter
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Son

To be continued…