This Day In Our Family History

1858

Caroline Ann Coles was born in Amphill, Bedfordshire, England, United Kingdom to Reuben Coles and Hannah Terrell. She was the 1st of 12 children, and the 1st of 5 daughters born to the couple

1899

Enos L. Jones was baptized and confirmed a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1928

Jane Lunt was confirmed a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1939

Carol Wynema Lunt was confirmed a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

Happy Birthday!

Alexander Corbett

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How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandfather: Jeremiah Terrell – 782
Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandmother: Mary Ann Webb – 783
Mary Ann 783 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Ann Terrell – 784
Ann 784 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Sarah Terrell – 785
Sarah 785 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Eliza Terrell – 786
Eliza 786 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: George Terrell – 787
George 787 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Maria Terrell – 788
Maria Terrell 788 +  Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandmother: Hannah Terrell – 429
Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Rachel Terrell – 789
Rachel 789 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Elizabeth Terrell – 790
Elizabeth 790 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Uncle: Henry/Harry Terrell – 791
Henry/Harry 791 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Marian May Terrell – 792
Marian May 792 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Aunt: Caroline Terrell – 793
Caroline 793 + Jeremiah 782 – Hannah 429 – Caroline Ann 208 – Grace 86 – David William 30 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

History: David William Rowley

GREAT GRANDFATHER AND THE SCYTHE

I think I was ten when I went to live with my great grandparents for a time. Their names were Reuben and Hannah Terrell Coles. Great Grandpa was a fine old gentleman from Wicken, Bedfordshire, England. He was not very big and had white hair. In England he used a scythe a great deal a great deal in harvesting crops. In the little community of Milo, Idaho, where he lived when I stayed with them, he also used a scythe to harvest his crops. He had planted and raised alfalfa hay close to his yards. The alfalfa was also close to his hog pens and he would cut some with his scythe every day. I would go out with him and he would let me try to use the scythe. He would say to me, “Billy, hold the heel on the ground and the tip of the blade up a little so it won’t dig in.” I learned to scythe quite well and have never forgotten it or him. I love him very much. The way he cut a field with a scythe it looked just like someone had cut it with a good mower. Each row fell smoothly and with even distance all along from the row before.

One day I was feeding the pigs some grain and the old sow wouldn’t let the smaller pigs have any so I took a fire shovel and held her back while the other pigs got some feed. Great Grandma (Hannah) Coles came around the pen just then and really got after me for hitting the sow, she wouldn’t let me explain.

One thing I remember about her was that she kept a big jar of mints and whenever any of us children or her other grand or great grandchildren came to her place she would give us some mints. Maybe that was where I learned to like them so well. I also remember that she was a beautiful lady.

To be continued…

History: David William Rowley

March 1979

As David occasionally says, “The Old Arab has moved again!” we are now living in Mountain Home, Elmore, Idaho. We are both well, but sometimes feeling our ages of 75 and 70! We are still trying to please our Heavenly Father.

Grandpa (Dave) is having trouble to remember the scriptures he loves so much, after he has studied them diligently. Grandma (Stella) tries to comfort him. She tells him that even if he doesn’t remember the exact thought, the spiritual food is received by his soul and it is enlarged when he ponders and mediated and gets closer to the Lord as he studies and that someday he will remember them again.

Grandpa likes something he first heard Grandma say back in 1972 – “If you persist in doing your duty after a while your duty becomes your pleasure.” Now, on 20 March 1979, she has added a sequel – “If you persist in NOT doing your duty, after a while you will have no real pleasure in anything you do.”

In late years we have seen a graphic example or two of this. We have also seen several examples of those who persist in doing their duty and their lives have been filled and their spirits enlarged and their pleasure has become joy! This is filling the measure of their creation, for the Lord has said… “Man is that he might have joy!” (Estella Tidwell Rowley)

I now have thirty-four grandchildren, (Estella has 21). I have seven grandchildren married, Estella has one married. I have fourteen great grandchildren, Estella has two. I would like to live to see all of them grown, see them go on missions, marry in the temple and have righteous families of their own. My goodness, I would really have a posterity then! Even if I don’t live to see it, I feel that I will know about it.

I would like to leave a Father’s Blessing with each and every one of you, my descendants.

Lovingly dedicated to my descendants – in the hope that some small part of my life experiences might be of interest, and possibly cause you, my loved ones, to live your lives with more courage and with more faith and trust in the Lord, I also hope that this history may help you to gain a deeper love for your fellowmen. My hope is that you will always seek first the Kingdom of God, that you pray earnestly and often enough that you get to know Him, so that you will be able to recognize His will and the things He has in mind for you. Keep all of His commandments and endure to the end, then, if I have lived sufficiently obedient and valiant, we have a happy reunion as a big and loving family. That we may be allowed to reside in His presence is my fervent wish. What a glorious day that will be!

I was called “Willie” when I was small, Bill when I grew older (still Bill to my brothers, sisters, nieces and nephews) and finally David or Dave in my later life. I first opened my eyes upon the scenes of this world in the lovely time of Thanksgiving in the little town of Shelley, Idaho. The day was 24 November, in the year 1903.

I am humbly proud of my heritage as all of us who descend from the early Mormon Pioneers can justly be. My great-grandparents (Ralph Nephi Rowley, Mary Ann Thompson, Nicholas Paul, Harriet May, David William Davis, Charlotte Nott Jeremy, Rueben Coles and Hannah Terrell) and my grandparents (John Thompson Rowley, Jane Paul, David Peter Davis and Caroline Ann Coles) on both my father’s (Hugh Thompson Rowley) and mother’s (Grace Davis) side joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, after which they immigrated to America from different parts of the British Commonwealth.

To be continued…

History: Grace Davis

About this time, the school district was also formed and a new school house was built at the “Forks.” It was a large, one room, frame building with a blackboard all along the north side of the room and three large windows on the south side. There was one door and two windows on the east and one door on the west. It was here that all the dances were held, dancing to the fiddle and the organ. Always during the evening there was time out for one or two numbers from the “step dancers” to show their skill. During the intermission, Grace and Verda May often sang a number or two of the songs which were so popular during these years and which were not the old-time songs.

The years of 1917-1918 were the time of the “Spanish Influenza” epidemic. Very few families escaped having it and the Rowley family was no exception. Hugh Thompson was the first one to get sick, then the two younger boys and Verda May became ill. Hugh Francis and David William were away on a hunting trip and when they came home, Grace wouldn’t let them come in but talked to them through the window. They stayed with a neighbor and took care of the night and morning chores, and also the other family needs. Hugh Thompson was very ill with the flu, while Emerson Adis, Walter Ilith and Verda May had it in lesser degrees. Grace took care of all of them until Hugh Thompson was better and could see that she too was ill. Hugh Thompson told the boys to phone the doctor and have him come and take his wife to the hospital. Hugh Thompson then managed with the rest of them. They lived on onion sandwiches and hot toddies. It was quite a menu, but they survived. It was during this epidemic that Grace lost her Grandmother (Hannah Terrell) in 1918. It was a wonder that Grace didn’t get it sooner as she was always going to the aid of others, regardless of how she felt. Verda May can still remember the little white masks, saturated with antiseptic, that everyone wore over their faces when around any illness.

One Saturday, Grace and Hugh Thompson were going to Idaho Falls to do some shopping. Verda May got permission to go horseback riding. Emerson Adis and Walter Ilith were going along with Verda May and her girlfriend. The boys were riding a work horse and Margaret and Verda May were riding a former racehorse which was almost a razorback. Contrary to instructions, they used a saddle. When they started for home, the boys went ahead of them as the girls had stopped to tighten up the cinch, which felt loose. In turning the corner, the cinch broke and they were thrown to the ground, Margaret landing on top of Verda May. The boys and a neighbor caught the horse, which had stopped running when he caught up with the other horse, and brought him back to the girls and they rode him home — minus the saddle. When Grace returned home, one look at Verda May’s swollen face and she knew her daughter had disobeyed. Verda May acknowledged what she had done and Grace felt she had been punished enough. Verda May soon recovered, but her mental anguish made her vow then and there that whatever she suffered in the future would not be for disobedience to her parents.

To be continued…

History: Grace Davis

The father of Grace Davis, David Peter Davis, was born 29 May 1854 at Aberaman, near Aberdare, Glamorganshire, Wales; the son of David William Davis and Charlotte Nott Jeremy. His parents were converts to the LDS Church when David Peter was ten months old, they immigrated to the United States because of their religious beliefs and they hoped to find better working conditions than in the mines of Wales.

They lived in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, where a daughter, Mary Ann, was born on 30 August 1856. Another daughter was born at Alma Town, Illinois in 1860, who was named Ellen Jane. Apparently, they were on their way through Missouri in 1861 when Ellen Jane took ill and passed away on the boat going from St. Louis to Florence, Nebraska and was buried at Harmon on the banks of the river 25 January 1861.

Grace’s mother was Caroline Anne Coles, a daughter of Rueben Coles and Hannah Terrill. They were both from England, but had immigrated and were living in Cedar Fort, where Caroline met David Peter Davis when he came to Cedar Fort to work. He met Caroline at a dance during the time they were holding an LDS Conference in Cedar Fort. They were friends for two years. Caroline was only seventeen and David Peter was twenty-one when they were secretly married on 8 October 1875.

Grace was the first child of eight born to David Peter Davis and Caroline Anne Coles. She was born 21 August 1876 in Cedar Fort, Utah. Her mother was living in the home of Grace’s grandparents, Rueben and Hannah. Of the eight children born to David Peter and Caroline, only Grace, Parley, Hannah and Charlotte lived to adulthood.  David Rueben died at the age of twelve and the others (two sons, Evan and Polly Davis) died at birth.

Parley was born 17 July 1878 at Cedar Fort, Utah. He never married and died 20 September 1943.

Hannah was born 21 November 1880 at Samaria, Idaho.

David Reuben was born in Samaria on 2 February 1883. When David Reuben was twelve years old, he and Parley were driving some horses. Parley became aggravated because they wouldn’t go where he wanted them to go; he picked up a slivery stick and threw it. It missed the horse and hit Rueben in the face. Not having drugs and medication to treat such things like we do today, tetanus or lockjaw, as they called it then, soon developed and Reuben lay for a month–slowly dying from the infection and starvation. He could neither eat nor drink. David Peter and Caroline sat by his bedside and watched their son slowly slip away from them. For some time David Peter was bitter about this as he couldn’t see the justice in one so young having to suffer so much. David Rueben died 20 September 1895.

Charlotte, the third daughter, was born 1 February 1866 at Milo, Idaho, in a log cabin with loop-holes for defense against the Indians. She was a frail child with a rheumatic heart. Because of this condition she was never really in good health and sometimes in very poor health.

To be continued…

History: Grace Davis

History of Grace Davis

Bert Lund Murphy – Son-in-Law (Husband of Verda May)
Caroline Ann Coles (208) – Mother
Charlotte Davis (214) – Sister
Charlotte Nott Jeremy (421) – Paternal Grandmother
David Peter Davis (207) – Father
David Peter Davis II – Half Brother
David Reuben Davis; Reuben (212) – Brother
David William Davis (420) – Paternal Grandfather
David William Rowley (30) – Son
Effie Cornelia Fowler – Stepmother
Ellen Jane Davis (423) – Paternal Aunt
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Son
Erma Thornton – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of Hugh Francis)
Evan Davis (215) – Brother
Grace Davis (86) – Self
Hannah Davis (210) – Sister
Hannah Terrill (429) – Maternal Grandmother
Harriet ‘Annie’ Rowley (199) – Sister-in-Law (Sister of Husband, Hugh Thompson Rowley)
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Son
Hugh Galloway – Nephew (Son of husbands sister, Harriet Ann Rowley)
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Husband
Jane Paul (198) – Mother-in-Law
Laura Greene – Stepsister
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of David William)
Mary Ann Davis (422) – Paternal Aunt
Mary Leah McGary – Wife of Nephew Hugh Galloway
Naina DeEsta Davis – Half Sister
Parley Davis (209) – Brother
Parley J. Davis – Paternal Uncle (?)
Pearl Greene – Stepsister
Polly Davis (216) – Sister
Reuben Coles (428) – Maternal Grandfather
Ruby Greene – Stepsister
Sarah Marie Alderson – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of Emerson Adis)
Son Davis (211) – Brother
Son Davis (213) – Brother
Verda May Rowley (88) – Daughter
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Son

To be continued…