History: Grace Davis

It is assumed that this is where Grace went to school as a list is given of the family names of children attending and the Davis name is mentioned. Her uncle, Parley J. Davis, given as the school clerk. The names of her teachers in the upper grades is not known.

In the late 1890’s, Grace went to work for J.B. Shelley in his Mercantile Store (the town was named after this man). It was here that she met a young man by the name of Hugh Thompson Rowley, who also worked for Mr. Shelley. They became very congenial and very good friends. They went together for quite a while and had many good times together with friends and other loved ones with whom they associated.

On 9 October 1901, with their hearts beating as one, they went to Salt Lake City and there in the Temple, the House of the Lord, were sealed for time and eternity by Temple President, John R. Winder.

In the words of Orson F. Whitney,

“Hearts must be pure to come within these walls,
There spreads a feast unknown to festive halls,
Freely partake, for freely God hath given,
And taste the holy joys that tell of Heaven,
Here learn of Him, who trumpeted o’er the grave,
And unto men the Keys, the Kingdom gave;
Joined here by powers that past and present bind,
The Living and the dead perfection find.”

Living and rearing a family in those early days was pretty rugged and it took faith and courage to meet the trials and reverses that came into the lives of Hugh Thompson and his lovely bride, Grace Davis. They both knew how to work, and work hard they did! Hugh Thompson worked in and around Shelley for about four years, during which time two little boys were born to them, Hugh Francis, born 30 June 1902, and David William on 24 November 1903. Both boys were born at the home of Hugh’s mother, Jane Paul Rowley, in Shelley.

Hugh Francis was so tiny they hardly thought that he would live. Hugh Thompson and Grace so enjoyed their tiny son and took such good care of him that he soon caught up on his size.

A near tragedy happened when little David William was about two years old. Grace was preparing to wash and Hugh Thompson was at work at the Sugar Factory. Grace had just finished diluting some lye to put in the boiler for boiling the clothes. She left the lye in a cup on the table and turned back to the stove. David William reached up on the table and took the cup, thinking it contained milk; he drank its contents all down. His screams caused his mother’s heart to about stop beating as she turned around and realized what had happened. She grabbed the vinegar and poured it down the little lad and sent for the doctor. They didn’t have telephones then, so it was awhile before he got there. She told him what she had done and he said it was the worst possible thing she could have done and her heart was filled with fear. He told her that she should have used olive oil instead of vinegar. She got in touch with Hugh Thompson at the factory and he came and they took David William to another doctor. The second doctor told them they had done the right thing, the only thing that could have saved David William’s life. Had she reached for the olive oil instead of the vinegar, the mix of oil and lye would have made a kind of soap and the lather would have choked the boy to death.

Bert Lund Murphy – Son-in-Law (Husband of Verda May)
Caroline Ann Coles (208) – Mother
Charlotte Davis (214) – Sister
Charlotte Nott Jeremy (421) – Paternal Grandmother
David Peter Davis (207) – Father
David Peter Davis II – Half Brother
David Reuben Davis (212) – Brother
David William Davis (420) – Paternal Grandfather
David William Rowley (30) – Son
Effie Cornelia Fowler – Stepmother
Ellen Jane Davis (423) – Paternal Aunt
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Son
Erma Thornton – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of Hugh Francis)
Evan Davis (215) – Brother
Grace Davis (86) – Self
Hannah Davis (210) – Sister
Hannah Terrill (429) – Maternal Grandmother
Harriet ‘Annie’ Rowley (199) – Sister-in-Law
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Son
Hugh Galloway – Nephew
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Husband
Jane Paul (198) – Mother-in-Law
Laura Greene – Stepsister
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of David William)
Mary Ann Davis (422) – Paternal Aunt
Mary Leah McGary – Wife of Nephew Hugh Galloway
Naina DeEsta Davis – Half Sister
Parley Davis (209) – Brother
Parley J. Davis – Paternal Uncle (?)
Pearl Greene – Stepsister
Polly Davis (216) – Sister
Reuben Coles (428) – Maternal Grandfather
Ruby Greene – Stepsister
Sarah Marie Alderson – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of Emerson Adis)
Son Davis (211) – Brother
Son Davis (213) – Brother
Verda May Rowley (88) – Daughter
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Son

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Updates

This Day In Our Family History; January 19, 2017

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  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Mary Elizabeth Enlow – 192
  • Visalia, Tulare, California, United States
  • San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 19, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Tuesday

This Day In Our Family History; January 19, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Harriet Miller – 289
  • Clarendon, Genesee, New York, United States
  • Josiah H. Miller – 284
  • Amanda Morgan – 285
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Mary Elizabeth Enlow – 192
  • Visalia, Tulare, California, United States
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California, United States
  • Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

This Day In Our Family History; January 20, 2017

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  • This Day In Our Family History
  • Della Lunt – 21
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 20, 2018

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Wednesday
  • David Arthur Sperry – 49
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Shedrick James Lunt – 43
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15

This Day In Our Family History; January 20, 2018

Deleted christening information for Joyce Gabbitas

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  • Christened On This Day

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  • Fairfield, Fairfield, Connecticut, United States
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Stroud, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Della Lunt – 21

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 21, 2017

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  • Tuesday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 21, 2018

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Thursday

This Day In Our Family History; January 21, 2018

Updated birth information for Mason Dennis Lunt

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  • Born On This Day

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  • Fairfield, Solano, California, United States
  • Mason Dennis Lunt – 978
  • Happy Birthday

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 22, 2017

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  • Wednesday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; January 22, 2017

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  • This Day In Our Family History
  • Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States
  • Wellington, Carbon, Utah, United States
  • Elizabeth Jane Rowley – 201
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Elizabeth Lunt – 103
  • VBC – Vine Bluff Cemetery; Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 22, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Friday
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46

This Day In Our Family History; January 22, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States
  • Wellington, Carbon, Utah, United States
  • William Josiah Sperry – 125
  • Ordinance by proxy
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 23, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Saturday

This Day In Our Family History; January 23, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Anna Sperry – 512
  • Bloomfield, Berkshire, New York, United States
  • Moses Sperry – 501
  • Sarah McLeod – 502

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 24, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Sunday

This Day In Our Family History; January 24, 2018

Added Tag: *May be edited for correct info if needed. Notifications will be posted if corrections are made

Added Categories:

  • Daniel Olpin – 303
  • England, United Kingdom
  • Ola Nelson – 143
  • Efveröd, Kristianstad, Sweden
  • Nils Olson – 141
  • Karma Palmgreen Anderson – 142
  • Grace Viola Harper – 26
  • Charles Benjamin Harper – 67
  • Harriet Gibbons – 68
  • Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 25, 2017

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  • Saturday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; January 25, 2017

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  • This Day In Our Family History
  • Sacramento, Sacramento, California, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 25, 2018

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Monday
  • David Arthur Sperry – 49

This Day In Our Family History; January 25, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Lydia Morgan – 541
  • Essex, Chittenden, Vermont, United States
  • Daniel Morgan Jr – 534
  • Abigail Jones – 535
  • Sacramento, Sacramento, California, United States
  • MANTI – Manti Utah Temple; Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 26, 2017

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  • Sunday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50

This Day In Our Family History; January 26, 2017

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  • Spring Glen, Carbon, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 26, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Tuesday
  • David Arthur Sperry – 49
  • Emma Elizabeth Webb – 133
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15

This Day In Our Family History; January 26, 2018

Deleted marriage and Sealing information for Eli Batchelor and Elizabeth Lunt – it was incorrect

Deleted Category:

  • 1866
  • Married On This Day
  • Sealed To Spouse On This Day
  • Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

Added Categories:

  • Ann Maria Lunt – 102
  • Willenhall, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Edward Lunt – 100
  • Harriet Wood – 101
  • Ella Karn Nelson – 65
  • Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho, United States
  • Spring Glen, Carbon, Utah, United States
  • Priscilla Wright – 273
  • John Wright – 264
  • Ann Perry – 265
  • LANGE – Los Angeles California Temple; Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 27, 2017

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  • Monday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 27, 2018

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Sarah Elizabeth Sperry – 120
  • Mary Emily Sperry – 121

This Day In Our Family History; January 27, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Miles Miller – 287
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Mary Phipps Brand – 331
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 28, 2017

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  • Tuesday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Shedrick James Lunt – 43

This Day In Our Family History; January 28, 2017

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  • Lorenzo Dow Doke – 196
  • California, United States
  • Robert H. Doke – 191
  • Mary Elizabeth Enlow – 192
  • Jane Paul – 198
  • Shelley, Bingham, Idaho, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 28, 2018

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Thursday
  • Caroline Webb – 47

This Day In Our Family History; January 28, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Lorenzo Dow Doke – 196
  • California, United States
  • Robert H. Doke – 191
  • Mary Elizabeth Enlow – 192
  • Jane Paul – 198
  • Shelley, Bingham, Idaho, United States
  • ARIZO – Mesa Arizona Temple; Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • ALBUQ – Albuquerque New Mexico Temple; Albuquerque, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States

This Day In Our Family History; January 29, 2017

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  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Caroline Webb – 47

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 29, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Friday
  • David Arthur Sperry – 49
  • Mammoth, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Scipio, Millard, Utah, United States

This Day In Our Family History; January 29, 2018

Changed birth information for Hugh Alcorn Rowley

Added Categories:

  • North Nibley, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Caroline Webb – 47
  • LOGAN – Logan Utah Temple; Logan, Cache, Utah, United States
  • Washington, Washington, Utah, United States
  • Hugh Alcorn Rowley – 37
  • Happy Birthday

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 30, 2017

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  • Thursday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

This Day In Our Family History; January 30, 2017

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  • This Day In Our Family History
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Elizabeth Ann Lunt – 42
  • William Josiah Sperry – 175
  • Moab, Grand, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 30, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Saturday
  • Lucy Jane Webb – 136
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15

This Day In Our Family History; January 30, 2018

Added Categories:

  • London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Martha Phipps Brand – 324
  • Charles Wood – 250
  • Willenhall, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
  • James Wood – 247
  • Ann Amos – 248
  • Charles Sperry – 117
  • EHOUS – Endowment House; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Elizabeth Ann Lunt – 42
  • MANTI – Manti Utah Temple; Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States
  • William Josiah Sperry – 175
  • Moab, Grand, Utah, United States

This Day In Our Family History; January 31, 2017

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Changed year from 1926 to 1925

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  • 1926

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  • This Day In Our Family History
  • John Thompson Rowley – 197
  • Spring Glen, Carbon, Utah, United States
  • Walter Illith Rowley – 90
  • Orem, Utah, Utah, United States
  • 1925

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; January 31, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Sunday
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Shedrick James Lunt – 43
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15

This Day In Our Family History; January 31, 2018

Changed year from 1926 to 1925

Deleted Category:

  • 1926

Added Categories:

  • Abigail Bishop – 737
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Ella Karn Nelson – 65
  • Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States
  • Jens Rosenquist Nelson – 58
  • Elsa Nelson – 59
  • MANTI – Manti Utah Temple; Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States
  • John Thompson Rowley – 197
  • Spring Glen, Carbon, Utah, United States
  • Walter Illith Rowley – 90
  • Orem, Utah, Utah, United States
  • 1925

History: Lillian Alcorn

It is at times like these that we truly appreciate our friends and loved ones. The comfort they can give to us is good for the soul. We usually take these loved ones and friends for granted and sort of expect them to do certain things, but when we have tragedy come to us they seem to go the extra mile to help us adjust to the problems, and they don’t seem quite as bad as they might otherwise.

It was surely lonely after Sharon was taken away. It seemed to leave a vacancy in our lives that nothing would ever fill. But it seems that time heals all wounds and that many other blessings come and soon such terrible heartaches drift into the background of life and the present becomes more real than the past.

As time went on we decided that we needed an outside entrance into our basement, so Dave proceeded to fix one. At this same time he was able to purchase a used coal furnace for $15 that had been taken out of another house to be replaced with a gas furnace. It was a good furnace and we appreciated it very much. We installed it in the basement with a big register cut into the floor of the living room upstairs. It was so good in the winter as we wouldn’t have to touch it all day long after it had been stoked and banked in the morning. It kept the house warm all day and way into the night. We would take care of it night and morning.

While we were working in the basement, Dave also fixed a large fruit room and a large coal storage bin as well as sleeping facilities for the boys. We set up a washing area in the basement for me, too. So we were quite comfortable in our home. Things take time, but we were accomplishing our goals little by little.

I had been told by doctors that it would be unwise for me to have another baby but my arms ached for a tiny one to fill them, since the loss of Sharon. So against the advice of the doctors, I found myself once again with child. I didn’t have a hard time carrying the baby until the last while. Two weeks before I was to have the baby the doctor put me in the hospital in Havre. I had toxemia and high blood pressure.

On the way to the hospital I had a very strange experience. Of course with my five boys and two girls I was hoping for another girl. In fact all the family were crossing their fingers for a girl, that is except for Clayton. He wanted another brother. Well, as we were driving to Havre, I was saying a silent prayer that My Heavenly Father would grant our desires. As I was praying to myself, a voice said to me as plain as anything could be, “you will have another beautiful boy.” It was such a real thing that I no longer desired a little girl and put my mind at rest knowing I was going to bear a son.

On 26 June 1944 the baby was born and it was a beautiful healthy boy. We named him Grant Alcorn Rowley. I remember that when we called a neighbor on the phone to let the family know, Clayton kept saying, “I told you it would be another boy.” But all the family was thankful it was over and that we had a sweet baby to fill the vacancy left by our lovely Sharon.

Grant was only about four months old when the doctor told us that he also had an allergy and asthma and that if we wanted to save him, we would have to move to a warm, dry climate. So we tentatively decided to rent our farm and sell our stock and equipment and move to Mesa, Arizona.

We had an auction sale for our farm equipment and stock on 16 December 1944 and then prepared to leave when we received a letter from my brother Leonard Alcorn. He lived in El Monte, California. He said that it was hot and dry down there and if we would come there, he would rent us a house and have a job waiting for Dave. So we decided to go to El Monte, California and we rented the farm to Harold Morris and left Harlem in January of 1945.

My Dad had his big truck, so he consented to help us move our belongings. We put our furniture and all our earthly possessions into his big van and Dave fixed a little camper-style back onto a pickup for the boys to ride in and off we went. We stopped along the way to visit relatives and so it took us several days to make the trip. Dave found some big rocks that we would heat and put into the camper to help keep the boys warm until we got out of the cold country.

The first night we stopped at Dillon, Montana where we rented a couple of rooms in a motel. But poor little Grant got asthma so bad, that we thought we were going to lose him there. We were up with him most all night. We left there very early the next morning. It was 20° below zero that morning as we left Dillon. It gradually got warmer the farther south we came.

The next day we went from the cold north to the town where Dave was born, Shelley, Idaho. His Aunt Annie Robinson lived there, and she was gracious and hospitable and prepared beds for us with her that night. We also visited with Dave’s uncle Royal James Rowley where our little son, Hugh, kept us all in stitches with his entertaining stories and jokes.

Our next stop was Brigham City, Utah where we stopped with my Uncle Albert and Aunt Dollie Weaver and enjoyed a visit with some of the Weavers who lived in the area. We spent the night there in Brigham City and then drove on the next day until we arrived in Utah’s Dixieland in Cedar City. We spent the night there with Dave’s Mothers sister, Aunt Hannah Foster. We enjoyed ourselves a lot in such a reunion. I had never met them, and Dave hadn’t seen them since he was about seven years old, so we talked until late hours and really enjoyed ourselves.

We arrived on Garvey Blvd. in El Monte, California about three o’clock in the afternoon on a February day in 1945. We called Leonard right away and he told us that the people who had been living in the house we were supposed to rent had scarlet fever and couldn’t move out. But he had made arrangements for us to move in with some friends until we could rent or buy a house. This proved to be quite a problem. There just didn’t seem to be any homes for rent in the area at all. There were quite a few places for sale, but they required larger down payments than we could give. We would look early in the morning and late in the evening trying to find something. It took us about two weeks before we found one we could even buy with our small down payment.

We did finally find a house that an older couple had built. It wasn’t very well constructed, but it was within our financial reach, so we decided to make the purchase. We signed the contract and made preparations to move in. We had agreed to let the older couple live in one of the rooms of the house for a month. The house was located at 237 S. Meeker Rd. between Garvey and Valley Blvd’s. The house had cement floors and our poor little Grant seemed to get a lot of hard knocks. Every time I turned around he seemed to be falling off something or other; the couch, his high chair or something. The floors were all so uneven and the walls were of insulations board. The ward there met in the Carpenter’s Union Hall about a mile or two away and the family was certainly glad to get going to Church again. The ward was quite different from the small branch we had known in Montana all our lives.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger

HISTORY OF HUGH THOMPSON ROWLEY
by David Wm. Rowley
contributed by David Wm. Rowley
He copied and filed in in the HISTORIAN’S BOOK,
by Luella Jones Downard

Hugh Thompson Rowley was born of goodly parents, who were both born to Converts of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

His father, John Thompson Rowley, was born at Colton, Ayre, Glasgow, Scotland. His father’s people were from Hanley, Staffordshire, England. Hugh’s grandmother was from Scotland.

Hugh Thompson’s mother, Jane Paul, was a daughter of Nicholas Paul and Harriet May, of Cornwall, England; who immigrated to Cape Town, South Africa. Most of Harriet’s brothers and sisters were born there. She died on 28 January 1908.

While in Cape Town, Jane Paul’s parents were visited by two Mormon Missionaries, William Walker and his companion, who converted them to the Gospel. They came to Utah within a year and settles at Holden, Millard, Utah, where she met and married John T. Rowley.

Hugh Thompson Rowley was born in a little town called Meadow, Millard, Utah, 2 Feb. 1879. He was the sixth child of the goodly parents; being proceeded by Harriet Ann, John Thompson, Elizabeth Jane, Eliza May, Ralph Nephi, himself, Clara, Royal James and William Wallace.

When Hugh was about two years old, his father married into polygamy, to Mary Jane Smith, for whose years later, at the time of the Manifesto, he left his first family and just took the second family. He spent the rest of his life with his second family; though at times he would pay visits to the first family. He finally left his first family entirely. The children of the first family would help care for his livestock and work at the charcoal kilns whenever needed.

Hugh, when about eight years old, was one day boarding his father’s stock, he was riding a burro, in the nearby hills. He decided that he could use a nice cool drink of water. There was a cold mountain spring not far from where he was herding stock, so he rode over and dismounted, and preceded to get his face close to the water and drink it in. he was very startled, and badly frightened when he saw mirrored in the stream a mountain lion just opposite him. To his dying day, he never knew how he ever reached the back of his burro so quickly. The burro seeming to sense the danger, also needed no urging to move away from the stream rapidly.

Upon arriving at home, Hugh told his father about the experience. But his father, knowing the imagination of children especially when frightened, would not believe Hugh’s story; however, he told Hugh that if he was just imagining his story, he would be whipped in a manner that he would never forget. Upon hearing this, Hugh agreed to lead his father to the spring where he saw the Mountain Lion. When they arrived, the father also discovered that there had been a mountain lion in the area; so Hugh was spared of having a very warm seat.

Hugh was only to complete the fourth grade, when at the age of nine years, hired out to herd sheep for a man by the name of John Bushnell of Fillmore, Utah for whom worked for several years.

One cool summer day while he was herding sheep, he had an experience with a loceed cow. That was to be remembered for the rest of his life. It was about midafternoon, and he was walking along keeping track of the sheep, when all of a sudden he heard a very loud bellow. He turned to see what was making the noise, and coming straight at him was what seemed like a giant cow. The first thing that entered his mind was to get into the nearest tree – but fast. Well, he was ????? not to get any dinner that day for the cow kept him up in the tree all day, finally she strayed off, and he was able to slip down and get away.

Not long after this experience, the area became infested with coyotes. For a safety precaution for the sheep, Hugh’s boss told him to carry a gun at all times.

One afternoon, when out with the sheep, he had a strong premonition to get rid of his gun and put it in a tree. The premonition kept coming to him – very strongly – so he finally did as he was prompted. It was not many minutes later that an electric storm broke out and Hugh had the misfortune of being struck by a thunderbolt. He lay unconscious for many hours, but the rain finally brought him to his senses. If the boy had kept the gun on his body, chances are that the lightening would have killed him.

When Hugh was sixteen, he hired out to work as a camp tender for a man named Edwards, for whom he again worked for several years. While in the employ of Mr. Edwards, he was involved in a fight for which the effects were to cause him much grief in later life.

A young fellow, by the name of Charlie, began to tell some tainted stories about Mr. Edward’s daughter, which were not true. One night while attended a dance he met this Charlie and called him on what he had said about Mr. Edward’s daughter. There followed a fight, which resulted in both boys being arrested.

Mr. Edward’s told Hugh that he would pay his fine if would meet Charlie again and make him acknowledge that the stories he told were false. Hugh agrees to do it and decided to give Charlie a flogging while he was at it.

Not long after, Hugh met Charlie at another dance and told him to acknowledge his deceit. There followed a terrific fight in which Charlie picked up a rock and began to beat Hugh over the head and on the neck and in the face. The wounds suffered in that fight resulted in cancer in his later life. He was finally able to make Charlie admit that everything he had said about Mr. Edward’s daughter was false.

Mr. Edwards offered to send Hugh through school along with his own son, who later became a renowned doctor in Salt Lake City, but Hugh declined, saying that his mother, brother and sisters needed his help too much to waste his time in school.

In the early spring of 1900, Hugh left the employ of Mr. Edwards and moved from Meadow, Utah, to Shelley, Idaho. His mother and family soon followed. He had not been in Shelley long before he was employed by a J.B. Shelley, who owned the local story and a large ranch not far from town. He soon became the general handyman, watchman and general ranch hand; he also did some draying.

Hugh at one time had a large dog by the name of Caesar which was a cross between a bulldog and a foxhound. He used to use Caesar to hunt wildcats, mountain lion, lynx, etc. with. The hides of these animals were sold for bounty, which helped to pay the living expenses of the family who were having a hard time getting settled and making ends meet.

One night while keeping watch at the Shelley store, a rowdy, who was attending a dance at the city hall, came over to the store and started to tease Caesar by shaking the door and contents standing near it. All of a sudden, Caesar bounded from behind the counter and leaped through the plate glass window and gave chase to the rowdy, who by this time had realized what the dog was doing and was hightailing it down the street. It seemed that fate was to be on the side of Caesar this night, for he caught the frightened boy and grabbed him by the pants and would have mauled him pretty badly if Hugh, who had given chase, had not caught up to the two and called the dog off.

The rowdy sued Hugh, stating that the dog attacked him without reason, and that the animal was a very dangerous nuisance in the community and should be destroyed. But, Mr. Shelley testified that the dog was only doing his duty; and that the ruffian had no business trying to cause a commotion, consequently Hugh and the dog were released, and the rowdy warned to mind his own business. But the rowdy was intent on having the dog destroyed; so Mr. Shelley had him put on probation, and warned him that if anything happened to Caesar, the rowdy would be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

While working for J. B. Shelley, Hugh met and courted a young lady by the name of Grace Davis, who later became his wife. She was the daughter of a local rancher by the name of David Peter Davis, whose people came from Aberdar, Glamorganshire, South Wales.

Hugh and Grace went together for about a year and on October 9, 1901 they were married for all time and eternity in the Salt Lake Temple.

They resided at the Shelley place for a while; and it was here that they received two little bundles of pride and joy, the first being Hugh Francis born 30 June 1902 and David William born 24 November 1903.

The enlarged Rowley family moved from Shelley and almost immediately to Sugar City, where Hugh worked for Utah and Idaho Sugar Company. It was while they were residing at Sugar City that their third addition to the family came along, Verda Day was born March 25, 1906.

One day, while Hugh was a work, Grace was hanging out clothes and not realizing what could happen, left a glass of lye on the kitchen table. Little David, thinking it was a glass of milk, grabbed the glass and drank it all down. Grace upon hearing David scream, came rushing into the house and grabbed a bottle of vinegar and poured the contents down David’s throat to counteract the lye. She, in the meantime had called Hugh in from the fields and rushed David to the doctor. The doctor told her she had done right by using vinegar.

David was not able to eat solids for many weeks, and only able to take liquid. One day he decided to try and eat some meat. The meat got halfway down and it couldn’t go any further. The piece of meat stayed lodged in his throat for three weeks, in which time he was slowly starving to death. One day while sitting on his grandmother’s knee, he asked for some jelly. When David swallowed the jelly it provided a slick surface for the meat to dislodge. David looked at his grandmother, a look of surprise and happiness on his little face, and said “Dramma, it’s gone. Dramma, it’s gone!” Everyone present, shed tears of joy and gratitude for the life-saving jelly.

Hugh and Grace, not long after, moved back to her father’s ranch in Rigby, and operated the ranch that year, the ranch saw the largest and best crop that it had ever seen.

The following winter the Rowley’s moved to Butte, Montana where Hugh worked in the mines. Butte, at this time was a fairly young and unsettled boom town; and much contention, strife and even murder took place on the streets of the city. The town was made up of almost all Irish population who banded together to run the city the way they wanted it run. Any person not of Irish decent had a hard time holding his own in the justice of courts or anything else.

Hugh and Grace moved back to her father’s ranch in Milo Ward, Ward, Rigby, Idaho. They operated the ranch another year and raised the best crops that was ever raised on the place. The following winter they again moved to Butte, Montana and worked in the mines.

At that time Butte was still a very young boom town, much roughness occurred. It was a life that neither of them liked and they soon moved back to Idaho, where Emerson Adis was born 4 September 1908 in a farm near Rigby, Idaho.

They lived in Idaho Falls the winter of 1910, Hugh worked on the power dams. It was here that Walter Ilith was born on 8 December 1910 and nearly died with the whooping cough.

Grace’s father, David P. Davis divided the ranch up among his children, Grace received the north forty acres, which they farmed and homesteaded a dry farm in 1912, between Willow Creek and Meadow Creek. They farmed both of these places for several years, until the family took Grace’s share of the estate (forty acres) given her by her father, away from her and that left them with just their dry farm to operate, which they did. Though many of the years were mixed with good markets and poor crops, and the poor markets and good crops. They got along better and accumulated a lot of stock and equipment. When they first lived on the dry farm they had to haul water three miles and drive all stock to the water once or twice a day, until they procured a piece of ground to build on down on the creek (Meadow Creek) and moved all their buildings down there.

In 19??  They organizes a branch Sunday School on Meadow Creek and held the services in our house. Ralph Hoggan was appointed Superintendent, we only held two ?? classes the very good small children and the adults. We all had a very good time. The adults took up the study of the Book of Mormon and Ralph Hoggan, a returned missionary from Hawaii was also the instructor.

They also got a school district and school organized and built a school house, Hugh Rowley, Stanley Bybee and Roy Hulse, being trustees. The school house was built a half mile below our place in Meadow Creek, where there were fourteen children who went to school.

The winters were very cold and the snow got very deep, making it very difficult to feed our stock, got in our wood supply and recondition the machinery. We had some wonderful times on our skis, and snow toboggans and had parties, dances, pretty regular to keep everyone having a good time.

When the crops were taken care of, they played some ball games in the summertime and all enjoyed it very much. Hugh was called old iron side, because of his ability to always hit the ball. While Nephi White was called Iron Horse for also being a heavy hitter. They enjoyed their games very much. Though their seasons were short and they lived and they had long distances to travel by wagon, buggy or horseback to the games, sometimes as far as thirty miles.

Hugh, Albert Call and Joe Heath went in together and bought and old horse power straw carrier threshing machine. We had to stock the straw for winter feed for our stock. They used this old threshing machine with a header they had and harvested their crops conjointly, until they go to planting too much crop, for the one outfit. Albert Call bought the others out.

In 1918, Tom Rix of Rigby and Dad bought a combine (Mason Harris) with which he harvested our crops for three years. They had a bumper crop in 1919.

In the spring of 1919, Dad rented the old George Davis, mother’s uncle, place or ranch, 160 acres, three miles west of Ririe, Idaho, owned by Mr. Milner of Idaho Falls.

We farmed both places for two years. While mother, Francis and I put in the crop in the valley, with my sister, Verda to cook for him. Then a couple of us including Dad would go up and harvest the crop, on the dry farm and the Francis and Ervid Vaneyole handled it for two years.

While we were living on the Davis place we went to school at the old Clark school and also the Clark Ward. Verda, Francis and I graduated from the eighth grade and started to High School in Rigby, Idaho in the fall of 1919. Francis drove the school bus the first year and I drove it the second year.

We enjoyed very much attending the Clark Ward. Mother worked very hard in the Relief Society and enjoyed it. It was in the Clark Ward that I became a Tenderfoot Scout. Dad did not take an active part in Church but he sure enjoyed it.

It was while living here, that Dad discovered he had cancers, caused by the bruises he received when hit by a rock in the hands of his opponent, Charlie, while living and working for Mr. Edwards.

This Day In Our Family History

1700

John Orpin was buried in Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom

1870

Joy Sperry and Mary Lamont were sealed for time and eternity in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints’ Endowment House, which was located in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

1880

Elizabeth Martin and Clarissa, Lydia and Harriet Morgan completed their endowments for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

Charles Sperry and Alma Margaretta Torkelson were married

1903

David William Rowley was born, in the covenant, in Shelley, Bingham, Idaho, United States to Hugh Thompson Rowley, age 24, and Grace Davis, age 27. He was the 2nd of 5 children, and the 2nd of 4 sons, born to the couple

1918

John Elmer Howard was born

1919

Melva Alcorn was born in Penrose, Box Elder, Utah, United States to Clark Alcorn and Harriet Ann Weaver

1934

Marvin Ballard Alcorn and Margaret F. Kiedrowski were married

1986

Gordon Ray Lunt died

This Day In Our Family History

1872 – Lorenzo Dow Doke was born in California, United States to Robert H. Doke and Mary Elizabeth Enlow

1902 – Mary Blakesley was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1908 – Jane Paul died in Shelley, Bingham, Idaho, United States

1939 – Nathaniel Potter was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1964 – Elizabeth Clinton was sealed for time and eternity to her parents, Lawrence Clinton and Mary Brockett, in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Mesa Arizona Temple, which is located in Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States

1964 – Mary Brockett was sealed for time and eternity to her parents, John Brockett and Elizabeth Doolittle, in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Mesa Arizona Temple, which is located in Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States

1964 – Lawrence, Mary, Lydia, Sarah, Ann and Phebe Clinton were sealed for time and eternity to their parents, Lawrence Clinton and Mary Wooden, in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Mesa Arizona Temple, which is located in Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States

1964 – Lawrence Clinton and Mary Brockett were sealed for time and eternity in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Mesa Arizona Temple, which is located in Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States

1971 – Anna Harding and Mary Packer completed their endowments for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Salt Lake Utah Temple, which is located in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

2016 – Gene Allen Nix completed his endowments for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in The Church’s Albuquerque New Mexico Temple, which is located in Albuquerque, Bernalillo, New Mexico, United States

This Day In Our Family History

1700 – John Orpin was buried in Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England

1870 – Joy Sperry and Mary Lamont were sealed for time and eternity in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints’ Endowment House, which was located in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

1880 – Charles Sperry and Alma Margaretta Torkelson were married

1880 – Elizabeth Martin and Clarissa, Lydia and Harriet Morgan completed their endowments for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1903 – David William Rowley was born in Shelley, Bingham, Idaho, United States to Hugh Thompson Rowley and Grace Davis

1918 – John Elmer Howard was born

1919 – Melva Alcorn was born in Penrose, Box Elder, Utah, United States to Clark Alcorn and Harriet Ann Weaver

1934 – Marvin Ballard Alcorn and Margaret F. Kiedrowski were married

1986 – Gordon Ray Lunt died