History: Charles Benjamin Harper

CHARLES BENJAMIN HARPER

Charles Benjamin Harper, the son of Elizabeth Phipps Brand and Benjamin Harper, was born November 21, 1848, at Saville St., Hackney, London, N. E. The family moved several times during his early years. Including these places in order: Bath Grove; an unknown location; Garden Place; Walworth Road, on the south side of the Thames, where Alfred was born. Next they moved to Leather Lane, Holborn, London, E. G. Here Charles was baptized at the age of eight. The next move was to Southampton St., Camberwell, which was also on the south side of the river. They moved to Saint Leonard’s Street, Bromley By Bow. This was their last move before coming to America.

His first school experience was at a Dame School which he attended at the age of six or seven. Their cost three pence (four to six cents) per week. Following this he attended a larger public school which he had no clear remembrance. At Leather Lane he attended “Baldwin’ Garden National School” for boys only. However, a girl’s school was also maintained and once a week the girls joined the boys for singing practice. The name of this school was decidedly a misfit because there was no garden nor even a playground. When they moved to Southampton Street he worked in his father’s store. While they lived in Bromley he attended the “Priory Street National School” for three months where he was head boy. He was now at the end of his formal schooling for at the age of fourteen he left school to work in his father’s oil shop. However, he did attend the “Saint Michael Night School” for a short period of time.

For his work in the store he received six shillings, (about $1.50) per week and paid three shillings to his mother for board.

He worked for his father until he was about seventeen years of age. At this time his mother desired to immigrate to Utah but his father was not very favorable to the idea. So she decided to send her eldest son, Charles, to America, in the hope that she could use this as an inducement for her husband to emigrate also. The father made no objection, so on May 5, 1866 Charles left England on the sailing vessel “Caroline”. His parents accompanied him to the London docks. His passage was paid to the frontier and he had eight or ten $2.50 gold pieced with which to face the new life.

During the six weeks of ocean voyage many amusing and some near tragic things occurred. The ship was heated by upright stoves. One day a pig which was being carried as part of the food supply got loose. It took refuge under the stove. In trying to get the pig out the stove was very nearly upset. Should this have happened very serious consequences from fire might have follow.

On June 11, 1866 the ship arrived in New York but the passengers were not allowed to leave the company. They went up the Hudson River by steamboat and over to New Haven, Connecticut. There they took the train to Montreal, thence to Toronto, and on to Sarnia. From there they crossed to Detroit and went on to Saint Joseph, Missouri. Here they boarded a steamboat and proceeded up the Missouri River for two hundred miles to a landing called Wyoming, Nebraska. At this place the eighteen year old Charles joined Chipman’s Wagon train and the long wearisome trek began.

The train left Wyoming on July 13 and reached Salt Lake City on September 15, 1866. Each day was full of hardships. Charles walked every step of the way, tired and often hungry. For the food allowance was not too plentiful. Each person was allowed 1 ½ pounds of flour a day. 1 pound of bacon a week, a little molasses and dried fruit given every two of three days, and a little saleratus to raise their bread. No sugar, tea, nor coffee was given to boys. This food was little enough for an active, growing boy and he and his partner, Joe Ellsmore, often picked up the up the burned crusts which the independent teamsters had discarded. At the Sweetwater Joe Ellsworth sold his shirt for some dried currants, rive and jerked, dried beef which he shared with Charles. At Coalville, Utah they went into the fields and raked barley for which Charles received about a half bushel of potatoes. A woman of the company traded some baby clothes for some beef and some of this she exchanged for some of Charles’ potatoes.

The train arrived in Salt Lake City soon after breakfast on Saturday, September 15. That same night Charles, in company with Fred Fowlkes, a teamster, left Salt Lake City for Pleasant Grove where Fowlkes resided. They spent the night camped along the Cottonwood just north of the present location of the Murray smelter.

After his arrival in Pleasant Grove he went to live with John Baker on what is now the Annie Holman property. As a climax to his first meal in this city he had his first real taste of native black currant pie. In return for his work he received his board, clothes and lodging. During his first Christmas season in Utah he went to Fountain Green for a load of coal. His breakfast on Christmas morning consisted mainly of frozen bread. He returned to Nephi in time for dinner which he ate at the home of Pete Sutton. The main course of this well-remembered meal consisted of pork sausage.

He remained with John Baker until March 1, 1867 when he went to work for Thomas Wooley for $150.00 a year plus his board and lodging. Out of this first year’s salary he paid his tithing, his temple donation, and his debt to the emigration fund. On March 1, 1868 he rehired to Wooley for $25.00 a month plus board and lodging.

His parents left England on Tuesday, June 30, 1868, arrived in New York on July 12 and in Pleasant Grove on August 20, 1868. They went to Lindon and made their home there. Charles went to live with them, boarding himself. During the summer of 1869 he farmed on share for Mr. Wooley. That fall in October he went to Eagle Valley, Nevada to help run a shingle mill. At that time Eagle Valley was supposed to be within the boundaries of Utah. He returned in February 1870 and in the same month shortly after his return he became engaged to Harriet Gibbons.

That same month he met with an accident from which he never fully recovered. In company with Joseph Olpin he went to Grove Creek to chop Balsam logs. There he caught in a snow slide which pinned his against a tree. The tree probably saved his life but his knee was twisted and as a result he walked the rest of his life with a decided limp which grew worse as he grew older.

On December 11, 1871 he and Harried Gibbons were married in the Endowment House by Joseph Fielding Smith who later became the President of the Church. They were accompanied by their mothers and the entire trip was made by horse and wagon.

They settled in a small rock house on property which he had bought on Locust Avenue. In this house were born six of their nine children. In 1885 he built a large home just south of his first home on the same property. Here he lived until his death.

On May 10, 1895 he left on a mission to his native country where he served until 1898. All this time his wife supported the family and kept him on his mission through hard work.

His life in the church and community was most active. He served for many years as secretary of the Sunday School before the ward was divided. At various times he served as City Councilman, Justice of the Peace, member of the school board which was instrumental in securing a high school building for Pleasant Grove, and as president of the Pleasant Grove Canning Company. At the time of his death he was a High Priest.

His wife died on October 30, 1922 after a lingering illness. During the later years of his life he devoted himself to the care of his nursery and to the enjoyment of his hobbies; chief of which ware his flowers, a notable library, and a fine shall collection.

He died very suddenly at his home of a heart attack on Sunday morning, October 29, 1933, less than one month before his eighty-fifth birthday.

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History: Lillian Alcorn

History of Lillian Alcorn Rowley

I was the oldest child of Clark Alcorn, who was born 3 January 1881 in Beattyville, Lee County, Kentucky, and Harriet Ann Weaver, born 26 March 1883 in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. I was born 7 January 1904 in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. I had blue eyes and medium dark hair and weighed about four pounds.

If I remember right, Dad said they lived in the 4th Ward in Brigham City, Box Elder Stake. I was blessed on the 31 January 1904 in the Perry Ward, Box Elder Stake, by James Sheldon Nelson Sr. (who later became the Bishop of the Thatcher Ward, Bear River Stake.)

In July 1905, my parents moved into the 3rd Ward in Brigham City and on 23 October 1905 my brother Leonard Clark Alcorn was born. He had large brown eyes and dark hair. In the fall of 1905 I believe it was, Papa and Mama moved to Garland, Utah where Papa worked at the Utah-Idaho Sugar Factory. We lived in a tent for a while. That winter we moved to Thatcher, Utah and lived in one room of my Aunt Fannie and Uncle Sheldon Nelson’s home. Aunt Fannie was my mother’s older sister. Not too long after moving there, I had diphtheria. One of my cousins, Myron Nelson died with the disease.

While I was recovering from this illness, I guess I was quite cross and it seems that my brother Leonard wasn’t feeling too well either, anyway Mama was rocking him. I somehow got the big toe on my right foot under the rocking chair and my toe was crushed. To this day I have a real thick toenail.

It seems that I was quite a proud little girl and when I was all dressed up to go somewhere I would always smooth my dress down and Papa said I would try to look at myself to see if my dress looked all right and if my hair was combed. Then I would strut around the house or down the road proud as could be.

On the 1st of March 1907 my brother William Vernon was born. We still lived in the one room at Aunt Fannie’s place in Thatcher. I don’t remember him, although I had just passed my 3rd birthday. On the 10th of May 1907 Mama and Papa were going into Brigham City. Dad was going with a load of grain and he was going in a big wagon. Bishop Nelson was going in a white-topped buggy. Mama was riding with the Bishop. The wind was blowing hard and baby Vernon was fussing and crying. Bishop Nelson was becoming annoyed and asked Mama if she could not quiet the baby. Mama was always sensitive about her children disturbing anyone so she held the baby tightly to her breast. When they arrived in Brigham City, Vernon appeared lifeless and limp. They took him to a doctor and he was dead. They told Mother that he had been a victim of heart failure to spare her further heartache, but actually he had been smothered. They took him back to Penrose the next day and buried him. As they went into their room after his burial, Dad rushed in ahead of Mother to remove the pillows from the rocking chair that she had taken the baby from the day before.

Some of my first recollections are the home where my Great Grandfather, William Weaver, lived on Burch Creek. I also remember my Great Aunt Rose when she couldn’t talk above a whisper. This was also on Burch Creek, close to Ogden, I believe. I remember one time when Bishop James Sheldon Nelson Jr. got my mother’s basket at a Basket and Bow dance held in in Thatcher, Utah. He teased Leonard and me telling us he was our new Daddy. We hid behind Mother’s skirts. He teased us all evening long. The Christmas of 1908 when I was about five years old, seven or eight little girls my age were dressed in long white dresses. We had our dolls and we laid them in a cradle made out of cardboard. We knelt beside the cradle and sang, “Away in a Manger,” at the Ward Christmas program. It was in the evening and were allowed to stay and watch the older people dance. It was a night of such fun and excitement.

While we were living on the Booth place in Thatcher, Utah some geese who belonged to Hans and Minnie Anderson, (they lived next door) would chase Leonard and I into the house. I remember how we would run and the geese would flap their wings and their bills would nip at the seat of our pants. We surely would run fast. This was the first time we lived on the Booth place and Dad planted an apple tree on this place.

My brother Marvin Ballard Alcorn was born 7 July 1909 on this Booth place in Thatcher, Utah. When he was born, Leonard and I were sent over to Bishop Nelson’s place and when it was time for us to come back home, they told us that Mother had a little pig in bed at our house. We both wanted to get in bed with Mother. Leonard got to lie down next to the baby first and I was very unhappy about it.

Dad grew sugar cane and ground it up and made molasses or sorghum out of it. I remember him digging a long strip out of the ground about two or three feet wide and about six to eight feet long and he would have it opened at one end. He shoveled on a slope so he could put wood or sage brush in the cane and cook the sugar and syrup. I don’t know what he made the vat out of but he would put it over the trench and fire.

In the fall of 1909 Mother started me to school in the Thatcher Elementary School which was about a mile from our home. I had been taught to always be truthful and never tell a ‘thib” as I called it. I wasn’t six and wouldn’t be until January 1910. Anyway I was to tell the teacher, Miss Hasel Watt, that I was six years old. When Miss Watt asked me how old I was I said, “I am five years old, but Mama said for me to tell you I am six!” I went to school for two days when they stopped me. My little girlfriend, Luetta Peterson was just four days younger than I was and she went on to school and graduated from the eighth grade a year before I did. The school was a two-roomed frame building. One room was used as a chapel and the other one was used as a schoolroom and recreation hall. It stood where the Thatcher-Penrose Ward Chapel now stands.

We moved to the Oliver place in Penrose soon after this. The house was two-roomed frame house. There were two rows of old fashioned poplar trees east of the house about ten rods apart and a row down along the partition fence for about a quarter mile.

One Halloween Dad took a load of sugar beets, after dark, down along the row of poplar trees hoping pranksters wouldn’t find them, as he had them all loaded and ready to start for the beet dump early the next morning. Well, the pranksters found the load of beets and unloaded them and tipped the box upside down. Dad was really angry, but he never did find out who the boys were.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

Updates

Updates

This Day In Our Family History; August 13, 2017

Added Category:

  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; August 13, 2017

Added Categories:

  • February 24
  • 1957

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger August 14, 2017

Added Categories

  • John Thompson Rowley – 56
  • Jane Paul – 57
  • Alaska, United States
  • December
  • Hugh Thompson Rowley – 28
  • Grace Davis – 29
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • June 24
  • 1957
  • August 21
  • August 10
  • August 4
  • August 26
  • September 8

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 15, 2017

Added Category:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

This Day In Our Family History; August 15, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 18
  • Caroline Webb – 19

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; August 15, 2017

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  • Deseret, Millard, Utah, United States
  • California, United States
  • Orem, Utah, Utah, United States
  • Delta, Millard, Utah, United States
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Garrison, Millard, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 16, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Jeanette Sperry – 9
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 18

This Day In Our Family History; August 16, 2017

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  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Charles Sperry – 36
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 37

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; August 16, 2017

Added Categories:

  • John Rowley – 216
  • Sarah Wright – 217
  • September 4
  • 1957
  • Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States
  • Monday

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 17, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 18, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 37

This Day In Our Family History; August 18, 2017

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  • Moses Sperry – 144
  • Sarah McCleod – 145
  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 45
  • Abraham Brand – 90
  • Ann Phipps – 91

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 19, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

This Day In Our Family History; August 19, 2017

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  • Edward Lunt – 32
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Elizabeth Venables – 89
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • JRIVE – Jordan River Utah Temple; South Jordan; South Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 20, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

This Day In Our Family History; August 20, 2017

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  • PROVO – Provo Utah Temple; Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 21, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 37

This Day In Our Family History; August 21, 2017

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  • Edward Lunt – 128
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • David Webb – 38
  • Esther Olpin – 39
  • Grace Davis – 29
  • Nels Rosenquist Nelson – 10
  • Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 22, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 18
  • Caroline Webb – 19
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 37

This Day In Our Family History; August 22, 2017

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  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Abraham Brand – 90
  • Ann Phipps – 91
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 18
  • Caroline Webb – 19
  • Earl Sperry Lunt – 4
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Pomona, Los Angeles, California, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 23, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

This Day In Our Family History; August 23, 2017

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  • Edward Lunt – 32
  • VBC – Vine Bluff Cemetery; Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States

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  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 24, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 18
  • Caroline Webb – 19
  • Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 37

This Day In Our Family History; August 24, 2017

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  • Nels Rosenquist Nelson – 10
  • Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 25, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 18
  • Caroline Webb – 19

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 26, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

This Day In Our Family History; August 26, 2017

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  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Charles Sperry – 36
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 37
  • North Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 27, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

This Day In Our Family History; August 27, 2017

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  • England
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 8
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 28, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 29, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9
  • Caroline Webb – 19
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 37

This Day In Our Family History; August 29, 2017

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  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 30, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9
  • Caroline Webb – 19

This Day In Our Family History; August 31, 2017

Added Category:

  • PROVO – Provo Utah Temple; Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; August 31, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 9

This Day In Our Family History; August 31, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 8
  • VBC – Vine Bluff Cemetery; Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • David William Rowley – 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger

JOHN THOMPSON ROWLEY AND JANE SMITH FAMILY:
Reported by David S. Rowley and wife, Selma

In the February issue of the paper we made a mistake and would like to correct it now. It is from Irene Jones Peterson: “Gordon, since Sept. 1957 has been with the U.S. Army, first at Fort Ord, and now at Fort McClellon, Alabama. He and Margaret Ruth Lewis were married at Rudley, (reported Rigley) Branch. Gordon was home for Christmas the went to Alabama, Jan. 3. Ruth finished her school term at Rudley College and joined him, March 6th. They are now living at 2202 Gurnee Ave., Anneston, Alabama. There is a small branch of the Church at Anneston, with a new chapel, so Gordon feels right at home. Ruth is soon to join the Church and she sings in the choir! Irene Peterson goes on to say that our little paper is a job and a wonder and that she enjoys it so much and likes to hear how everyone is doing and where they are. May this reporter add that it is a joy to get letters with news in them. I sure wish everyone would follow suit.

Our family surely has good news. In the past 3 ½ months, David and I have become grandparents three times!! On February 9, 1958, our son Jack and his dear wife, Barbara presented us with a grandson. He was born at Victorville, California and weighed 6 lbs. 7 oz. They had him blessed in March 2nd and gave him the name of Jeffery Ray Rowley.

Just 15 days later our daughter, Gayle, who is married to Franklin Dee Wareham gave birth on February 24,  to a lovely little girl. She weighed 6 lbs. 13 oz. her daddy blessed her on March 30, and gave her the name of Linda. Gayle and Franklin went through the Salt Lake Temple on June 7, 1957.

On May 12, 1958, our son, Wayne and very good wife, Annette ??rgeline McAuther, went through the Salt Lake Temple and two weeks later on May 27 a son was born to them. He weighed 6 lbs. 11 oz. His daddy blessed him, July 6, and gave him the name of David Scott Rowley. Both these last two babies were born in Salt Lake City at the L.D.S Hospital.

I forgot to mention in my last report that on December 19, 1957 Gayle went through the Temple and did the endowment work for her sister, Celia Phyllis, who died Sept. 29, 1956 of injuries suffered in an auto accident.

On Monday, June 2, 1958, Fred and Harriet Rowley, Mrs. Sarah Rowley, Mrs. G. A. (Pe??l) Rowley and myself, (Selma Rowley) went to Provo to attend the funeral of Ethel May Bedkett Rowley Beardall. She died on May 29, in Provo.

It was nice to see family members again and chat with them. Seems as if that’s the only tine we get together is on one of these sad occasions. Ethel Jane has a lovely family as does Ruth. Reginald Rowley, who is Aunt Ethel’s second son, and the baby of the family, flew out from Annapolis, Maryland, where he is an instructor at the Naval academy, for his mother’s funeral. He sure looks like the Rowley’s. he is married and has two children.

Aunt Mary Ann Rowley Jones and her daughter, Luella were there, also Manuel, Luella’s husband. Winifred Rowley and his wife, Addie were there. They have five babies now and live in Provo.

Luella and Manuel’s daughter, Rebecca, (Mrs. Neil Adendauh) had a little baby boy (I don’t have the date), at the Dragerton Hospital. He only lived 1 ½ hours. They named him Louis Lee.

William W. and Olive Louis Jones finally got a girl. She was born, May 1, in Salt Lake City and the named her Elizabeth Ann. Such a lovely old name. this young lady is bound to be spoiled and why not, she has five older brothers.

Lenna and Waldo Bushnell and their children came over to Spring Glen to see their mother Mrs. Sarah Rowley, for Easter. Grandma Rowley (Sarah) went to Moab last month (May) to help her daughter, Celia Anderson, who had been in the hospital.

This Day In Our Family History

1680

Tamazine Lunt died

1892

Harriet Miller died in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

1897

Samuel Blakesley completed his endowments for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1920

Que Dee Jones was born in Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States to Enos L. Jones and Zetta Priscilla Grace

1927

Elizabeth Betsy Spencer and Lucy and Mary Ann Webb were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1929

James Harper completed his endowments for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1954

Obadiah Wheeler completed his endowments for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

2003

Lana Karen Lunt was sealed for time and eternity to her parents, Morgan William Lunt and Martha Ellen Fullmer, in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints’ Manti Utah Temple, which is located in Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States. She also completed her initiatory and endowment ordinances at the same time.

Journal: Jeanette Sperry

1897 – I went down tot Aunt Emma Hague’s (Emma Elizabeth Webb) and took a music lesson then on down to the post office. I had dinner up to Burton’s. In the afternoon, I went down to the courthouse and took a shorthand lesson and practiced on the typewriter. Towards evening Esther and I walked out to the farm. I fixed my business affairs so that I would not have to go up town for two weeks.