History: Lillian Alcorn

The boys were active in the Future Farmers of America organization in school and had projects of chickens and pigs at home. Douglas had the chickens and Clayton had the pigs. One Saturday afternoon, the boys had all gone to the movie except Grant and Hugh. Clayton’s pig was due to have a litter anytime and it happened while the boys were at the show and Dave was at work. I took Hugh into town and sent him into the theater to get the boys. When he found them they were in the middle of the row and Hugh couldn’t get to them so he said in a loud whisper, “Clayton, Clayton, come quick, your pig is having chickens!” Needless to say this brought down the house as all the people around the boys heard Hugh’s excited declaration and had a good laugh.

27 September 1950 was a day of mixed emotions for me. I received word that Grace had given birth to another lovely little girl the named Donna Diane; and we also received word that my father, Clark Alcorn had died (27 September) in Idaho, and they were having his funeral 3 October 1950. We wanted to go to the funeral, but we couldn’t decide whether or not to take the family. Dave remembered that at his Dad’s funeral, he was the only one without his family, so we decided to take the children and go to Harlem. We made arrangements to leave and had a safe trip. It was good to see many of our relatives and friends again, and all of my brothers and sister were together again for the first time in a long while. Even Verl was able to make it. It was a reunion, saddened only by the purpose.

Dave’s employers had both been drafted back into the Armed Services, and so his job was gone and in looking for the other work, we found that it was scarce around Gridley. So Dave went to Eureka, where his brothers Walter and Emerson lived, and found work there. He worked in Eureka the winter of 1950-51 and into the spring. Then I went over to see if we could find a house and move our family there. We looked at several, but we hadn’t decided on one when I had to go back to Gridley. When school was out, we knew we would have to make a decision on a house and we finally bought one located at 4217 Little Fairfield St in Eureka.

The children said their farewells again to many friends they had made and we picked up after selling our house in Gridley and made another move. We all liked Eureka, except for the undependable weather. Adjusting wasn’t too hard as Dave had been there for over six months and he knew the people in the branch quite well. We also had relatives there for the children to enjoy.

Before we left Gridley, we had received word that David’s body was being sent home and we could plan a funeral. After we moved, we notified the Army and shortly after we had settled in Eureka, David’s body arrived. We moved in July of 1950 and David’s body came just a few weeks after. His body was escorted by a very nice military escort. We had a lovely funeral and because we didn’t know too many people we hadn’t expected many to attend, but there was a nice group of people there. The main speaker was Lowell Thompson, who has proven to be a life-long friend ever since we met him in Eureka.

David was buried in a lovely cemetery (Ocean View Cemetery) with full military rites. The cemetery was not far from our home in Eureka. There was a lovely view of the ocean from his plot and it was a restful place.

In August, we were attending MIA as usual and enjoyed the activities that it offered. The branch usually had a dance after class time each week. This one Tuesday evening in August Dave and I had danced a fast member. I was a little out of a breath when we finished, but nothing too unusual. I felt tired as I had worked hard that day and we decided to leave MIA early. When I got to the car I was having pains in my chest and by the time the family got there the pain was getting quite severe and spreading down my left arm. I told Dave that we had better hurry and get home as I didn’t feel at all well. I frightened Dave and he drove as fast as he dared. On the way home we passed the General Hospital and the pain was getting so bad that I could hardly stand it. Dave decided we had better stop at the hospital and find out what the trouble was. When we got there he jumped out of the car and came over to my side and opened the door to help me. He reached for me and I remember saying “Oh, Dave, I’m gone!” Then everything went black. I went limp and slipped right through Dave’s arms and skinned my knees on the gravel. In the meantime, Dave sent Marjorie and Hugh into the hospital for help. They were so excited that the attendants couldn’t understand them so they just followed the kids out to the parking lot. They got me into the hospital and into bed and contacted the doctors.

Dave called the chapel and President Walter Bingham, the Branch President came and took the children home. The doctors told Dave that I had had a heart attack, a coronary thrombosis. They also told him that the first crises would pass in 24 hours. I was in an oxygen tent. If I survived the first 24 hours, the next crises would be 72 hours. If I passed that I would probably survive.

An unusual dream came to me during this crucial time. I dreamed I saw my mother in an old-time buggy. She seemed to be very happy and was going someplace singing. I didn’t know just where it was she was going, but she was singing. I wanted very much to go with her and held out my arms to her. She told me that I wasn’t ready to come and that I was needed at home. I remember being very disappointed because I had to stay behind. Shortly after this dream I passed the 72 hour crises and was on my way to recovery.

Ralph and Clayton had been working in Montana at the time of this attack, and I asked Dave not to send for them, but of course he did. They came home as fast as they could. Dave also contacted my sister Melva and she came up for a few days to help out at home. Elder Delbert L. Stapley was in Eureka attending a district conference while I was still in the hospital so Dave arranged for him to come and give me a blessing. I appreciated this very much.

The Relief Society helped out at home very much, although Marjorie took over the major portion of the work and cooking. Ralph liked to tease her by saying that he lost over 7 pounds with her cooking. While I was in the hospital, which was over six weeks, Marjorie also had to buy Grant’s school clothes. She did a fine job except she didn’t allow for him to grow. By the time school was half over they were all too small and we had to get him some more.

When the time came for me to come home from the hospital the doctors wanted someone to be there with me and to help with the work and worry. So we made arrangements for Grace to come and stay with us and help me. She came from Virginia where they were stationed. Soon after she came with her two little girls, Don was given an overseas assignment, but he was unable to take his family with him right at first, so Grace and the girls stayed there in Eureka with us. After I was back on my feet a little, Grace and the girls decided to find an apartment and she went to work as a waitress in a local drive-in.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

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History: Lillian Alcorn

The children got back into school and were adjusting quite well, however it did seem rather hot for February. The elementary school was about three blocks away and the high school was about four blocks in the opposite direction. Both were good schools.

Grant seemed to still have his bad spells of breathing difficulty. It seemed to be worse when he ate certain foods. Then one day we left him with Leonard’s girls to tend for a few hours and they fed him a lot of cookies and other things. That night he had a terrible spell and we were up most of the night. We thought sure we would lose him this time. So the next morning we called a Dr. Hamilton in Pasadena. He was supposed to be one of the best baby specialists in the area. When Dave  called for an appointment he was told that the doctor was filled up for three months. Dave told them that that wouldn’t do us any good as our baby wouldn’t live that long. The doctor then told us to bring him over at closing time and he would take care of him. The doctor didn’t think he could possibly have asthma, but after examining Grant he decided that he really did have asthma and a serious case, too. He made an appointment for us to take Grant to Helen James, who was to give him a number of tests for allergy. We kept the appointment and she pricked the skin on Grant’s little back with some kind of needle and then put a drop of liquid on the spot. She did this in about 200 places. It was surely hard to stand back and watch him being hurt and crying so hard. We took him back the next day for the results and we found that he was allergic to wheat, potatoes and beef. We then took him back to Dr. Hamilton and he gave us a prescription to help him whenever he began to get stuffed up. We also discovered that oranges would help him over his spells, so we would give him all he would eat.

We hadn’t been in El Monte very long when Grace became quite interested in the boy next door. His name was Donald Eugene Smith, and he was in the Navy. They became very good friends and then one day in June they came to see us and talk to us about getting married. They were both so young that we didn’t feel they were ready for marriage or prepared to face the problems of married life yet. We told them that they should think it over very carefully first and study each other to see if they could get along. After all, they were the ones who would have to live with each other. They did decide to wait a while before making any final decisions, but they didn’t wait very long. They approached us again in July and still felt that they wanted to get married, so we agreed to let them become man and wife. Arrangements were made for a 4 August 1945 wedding. The bishop of the ward, Fred S. Batch performed the ceremony in his own home and then the young couple was honored at a reception in the home of Don’s parents (Joe Ben Smith and Coral Lorraine Bolton)*. They then moved to San Pedro where Don was stationed with the Navy.

*Joe was married to Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder and Coral was married to John Joseph Everhard at the time, not sure which home the reception

It was surely hard to see Grace go out on her own as she had been so much help to me in the home and with the younger children. She was a very good little housekeeper. I now began to realize just how much help Grace had been all through the years. She was so faithful and responsible.

Both Dave and I worked in the ward and had several different positions. I soon began to realize that we had to spend more time with the family to teach them the things they should know and I tried to do this. But I still worked in the Relief Society and the MIA. Dave taught the Sunday School class that Douglas and Ralph were in. He also was a Genealogical Committeeman as well as working with the Welfare program and Elder’s Quorum Presidency. So you see we were kept pretty busy.

Dave had found work with the U.S Rubber Co. for the first six months we were in El Monte as a bagger of tires. When summer came he began to take on other jobs to help with the expenses of a large family. We had been used to raising much of our food and now we were in the position of having to buy most of it.

It was hard to keep the children occupied too. They were used to farm life and having the run of the farm. But in the city there was so much mischief to get into when they weren’t in school. They did find enjoyment in going to the school grounds and playing ball which helped fill much of their time and was surely a big help to us in their management.

In June, Dave quit U.S. Rubber and went to doing carpenter work around the neighborhood. Then he went down and joined the Carpenter’s Union and they sent him out on jobs and he kept pretty busy and made $1.35 an hour which was pretty good in 1945.

One day the school called me and told me that Douglas was having a lot of difficulty seeing well enough to read. They recommended that we have a special eye operation, which at the time we didn’t have money for. Soon after, the President of the El Mote Lion’s Club came to see us. They wanted to sponsor the money for the operation from a special fund they had for things of this kind. We were told we could pay them back as we were able, so we agreed and an appointment was made for us at the Eye Clinic down in Los Angeles. Dave had to work, so I took Douglas down to the clinic for the surgery. They said the muscles in the back of his eyes needed adjusting. They had to remove his eye and adjust the muscles and then put it back in place. After that it was necessary to take eye exercises for months to get the muscles adjusted to working together. We had had some warning that there was something wrong with Doug’s eyes while we were living in Montana. We had purchased glasses for him there. One day Douglas came home from school in Harlem without his glasses, which had cost about $20.00. When we questioned him about them, he told us he had sold them to a playmate for a nickel. We had quite a time getting them back as the boy’s father said that a deal is a deal. But finally he consented to let us buy them back.

We had a wonderful group of friends in El Monte and we used to do quite a few things together. We would go to parties, movies and enjoyed being together. We were all members of the Church and attended Church functions as a group, too. There had been several surprise birthday parties given within the group and Dave said one time that it would take a lot of doing to surprise him. So the gang decided to put it to the test and they planned a surprise birthday party for him. We were going to have a get together on Dave’s birthday anyway and go to the Deardens’ home to make donuts and play games. What Dave didn’t know was that they were coming to our place first to surprise him. They all parked their cars around the corner and came quietly into the house. One of the ladies came in first and asked where Dave was and I told her he was in the bedroom, but to be careful that he might be dressing. Well she didn’t hear the last part of my sentence and the whole group, led by several ladies barged into the bedroom with a big “SURPRISE.” I believe they were as surprised as Dave was because he was just putting on his trousers and they were all very embarrassed. We had many good laughs about it later.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

History of Lillian Alcorn Rowley

I was the oldest child of Clark Alcorn, who was born 3 January 1881 in Beattyville, Lee County, Kentucky, and Harriet Ann Weaver, born 26 March 1883 in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. I was born 7 January 1904 in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. I had blue eyes and medium dark hair and weighed about four pounds.

If I remember right, Dad said they lived in the 4th Ward in Brigham City, Box Elder Stake. I was blessed on the 31 January 1904 in the Perry Ward, Box Elder Stake, by James Sheldon Nelson Sr. (who later became the Bishop of the Thatcher Ward, Bear River Stake.)

In July 1905, my parents moved into the 3rd Ward in Brigham City and on 23 October 1905 my brother Leonard Clark Alcorn was born. He had large brown eyes and dark hair. In the fall of 1905 I believe it was, Papa and Mama moved to Garland, Utah where Papa worked at the Utah-Idaho Sugar Factory. We lived in a tent for a while. That winter we moved to Thatcher, Utah and lived in one room of my Aunt Fannie and Uncle Sheldon Nelson’s home. Aunt Fannie was my mother’s older sister. Not too long after moving there, I had diphtheria. One of my cousins, Myron Nelson died with the disease.

While I was recovering from this illness, I guess I was quite cross and it seems that my brother Leonard wasn’t feeling too well either, anyway Mama was rocking him. I somehow got the big toe on my right foot under the rocking chair and my toe was crushed. To this day I have a real thick toenail.

It seems that I was quite a proud little girl and when I was all dressed up to go somewhere I would always smooth my dress down and Papa said I would try to look at myself to see if my dress looked all right and if my hair was combed. Then I would strut around the house or down the road proud as could be.

On the 1st of March 1907 my brother William Vernon was born. We still lived in the one room at Aunt Fannie’s place in Thatcher. I don’t remember him, although I had just passed my 3rd birthday. On the 10th of May 1907 Mama and Papa were going into Brigham City. Dad was going with a load of grain and he was going in a big wagon. Bishop Nelson was going in a white-topped buggy. Mama was riding with the Bishop. The wind was blowing hard and baby Vernon was fussing and crying. Bishop Nelson was becoming annoyed and asked Mama if she could not quiet the baby. Mama was always sensitive about her children disturbing anyone so she held the baby tightly to her breast. When they arrived in Brigham City, Vernon appeared lifeless and limp. They took him to a doctor and he was dead. They told Mother that he had been a victim of heart failure to spare her further heartache, but actually he had been smothered. They took him back to Penrose the next day and buried him. As they went into their room after his burial, Dad rushed in ahead of Mother to remove the pillows from the rocking chair that she had taken the baby from the day before.

Some of my first recollections are the home where my Great Grandfather, William Weaver, lived on Burch Creek. I also remember my Great Aunt Rose when she couldn’t talk above a whisper. This was also on Burch Creek, close to Ogden, I believe. I remember one time when Bishop James Sheldon Nelson Jr. got my mother’s basket at a Basket and Bow dance held in in Thatcher, Utah. He teased Leonard and me telling us he was our new Daddy. We hid behind Mother’s skirts. He teased us all evening long. The Christmas of 1908 when I was about five years old, seven or eight little girls my age were dressed in long white dresses. We had our dolls and we laid them in a cradle made out of cardboard. We knelt beside the cradle and sang, “Away in a Manger,” at the Ward Christmas program. It was in the evening and were allowed to stay and watch the older people dance. It was a night of such fun and excitement.

While we were living on the Booth place in Thatcher, Utah some geese who belonged to Hans and Minnie Anderson, (they lived next door) would chase Leonard and I into the house. I remember how we would run and the geese would flap their wings and their bills would nip at the seat of our pants. We surely would run fast. This was the first time we lived on the Booth place and Dad planted an apple tree on this place.

My brother Marvin Ballard Alcorn was born 7 July 1909 on this Booth place in Thatcher, Utah. When he was born, Leonard and I were sent over to Bishop Nelson’s place and when it was time for us to come back home, they told us that Mother had a little pig in bed at our house. We both wanted to get in bed with Mother. Leonard got to lie down next to the baby first and I was very unhappy about it.

Dad grew sugar cane and ground it up and made molasses or sorghum out of it. I remember him digging a long strip out of the ground about two or three feet wide and about six to eight feet long and he would have it opened at one end. He shoveled on a slope so he could put wood or sage brush in the cane and cook the sugar and syrup. I don’t know what he made the vat out of but he would put it over the trench and fire.

In the fall of 1909 Mother started me to school in the Thatcher Elementary School which was about a mile from our home. I had been taught to always be truthful and never tell a ‘thib” as I called it. I wasn’t six and wouldn’t be until January 1910. Anyway I was to tell the teacher, Miss Hasel Watt, that I was six years old. When Miss Watt asked me how old I was I said, “I am five years old, but Mama said for me to tell you I am six!” I went to school for two days when they stopped me. My little girlfriend, Luetta Peterson was just four days younger than I was and she went on to school and graduated from the eighth grade a year before I did. The school was a two-roomed frame building. One room was used as a chapel and the other one was used as a schoolroom and recreation hall. It stood where the Thatcher-Penrose Ward Chapel now stands.

We moved to the Oliver place in Penrose soon after this. The house was two-roomed frame house. There were two rows of old fashioned poplar trees east of the house about ten rods apart and a row down along the partition fence for about a quarter mile.

One Halloween Dad took a load of sugar beets, after dark, down along the row of poplar trees hoping pranksters wouldn’t find them, as he had them all loaded and ready to start for the beet dump early the next morning. Well, the pranksters found the load of beets and unloaded them and tipped the box upside down. Dad was really angry, but he never did find out who the boys were.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger

MORONI ROWLEY AND MARY MAXFIELD
Reporter, Clara O’Toole

This reporters two daughters, Lottie Bayton, and Selma Chilt, from Western Washington, her husband, John and herself, had a hurried trip through Utah and into Western Colorado in June. Selma was driving her car and had to report for summer classes at Columbia University, N. Y. early in July. In Utah we stopped only at Provo to have the car greased. We telephones Eleanor Terry, and met her and a short but delightful visit. My husband and I went as far as Glenwood Springs, Colo., and returned to Oakland from there. Lottie, an her daughter, went as far as Denver. Lottie returned by air to Port Angeles, Washington and Russelle, went to N. Dakota to spend the summer with her sister, Barbara and husband Gerry Johnson, at the two of Luverne.

My husband and I were raised in the same community in Wester Colo., so we had a delightful time. While in Colorado, I heard that my sister, Winifred and her husband Will Clevenger had been in our old home-town early in June, but she hasn’t written me the details of their trip.

My youngest brother Leslie Rowley and wife, Eleanor, plan to go to Rochester, Minnesota, the last of July. Eleanor, who has been in poor health for quite some time, is going through the Mayo Clinic.

I would like to contact Mary Ann Rowley, or someone close to her. Her mother was Hannah Sorenson and was married to my father in the early 1800’s. My address is as follows:

Mrs. Clara O’Toole
1467 MacArthur Blvd.
Oakland 2, California

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger

RALPH NEPHI ROWLEY HISTORY continued
-by historian, Luella Jones Downard

In the spring of 1853 each man was given as much land as he could fence and cultivate. Ralph Nephi Rowley and his father-in-law, Hugh Thompson, each had land allotted to them along the hills east of Fillmore, known as the “Best Ditch” farms.

Some of their close neighbors here were Jonathan P. Smith and Albert Shail. Jonathan P. Smith had come over the plains in the same company as Hugh Thompson. Ralph’s sister Mariah, who had buried her first husband, George Olom, and little son, Uriah Olom, in England and later migrated to Fillmore with her daughter, Zuriah Olom, married Jonathan P. Smith.

Zuriah Olom later married George Albert Shails.

Another of their close neighbors was Amasa Lyman, (whose son, Lorenzo Snow Lyman married Zuriah Rowley, the oldest daughter of Ralph’s brother, James Rowley).  Years later Amasa Lyman’s son Ira Depo Lyman, married Ralph’s daughter, Elizabeth Ann.

Another neighbor was Richard Day, whose daughters Mary and Martha, became the wives of Ralph’s brother James. Years later when James died, Ralph married his brother’s wife, Mary Day Rowley, in polygamy.

We have several records of Ralph and Mary receiving their endowments and also of Ralph attending for James with Mary Day and that they were sealed.

In July of 1853 there were a great many Indian scares and depredation. The fort was guarded night and day by both close and picket guards. Men went to the fields in large companies, carrying their guns with them for protection at all times. Kanosh and his friendly Indians helped harvest the grain.

Conditions became so bad that the State House workers took down their shanties and moved them into the Fort, where they would be safer from Indian attacks.

George Arthur Rowley in one of his histories relates: “Here they built a dugout in which to live, there is a monument on the place now.” Mary Ann’s father Hugh Thompson probably lived with them and the children in this humble home.

In August 1853 martial law was declared. A triangle of steel was made to use in sounding an alarm to call the men and boys from the field when there was an alarm. The milch cows were herded together and guards placed around them. At night they were all taken to a public corral and milked while the men took turns standing guard.

On September 13, 1853, a man, William Hatton, was killed by the Indians while standing guard at this corral.

Ralph and his father-in-law were both fine stone masons, and they helped to cut and lay rock for early state structures.

On October 26, 1853 a baby boy was born to the Rowley’s, while they were living inside the fort wall. They named him Walter Thompson Rowley. When Thompson is added to the name of a Rowley child it is to honor the beloved grandfather, Hugh Thompson. He had had no male child to carry on the name of Thompson. This may account for one reason for honoring the name but I like the reason George Arthur Rowley gives in one of his histories: “I love the name of HUGH and I named one daughter Hughetta, because I love it so. The stories I have been told of him make me very proud of his name and memory.” What a pity that none of those stories were ever written. Now we know only that his character was such that “HUGH THOMPSON” is a name of honor among the descendants of Ralph Nephi Rowley and Mary Ann Thompson.

This little bank of pioneers harvested their first crop of grain by cradle and gathered the stocks by hand, making them into bundles. They then laid the bundles on large pieces of canvas and led the horses over the bundles to thrash the wheat out. With the help of the wind they separated the wheat from the chaff. When it was washed and dried it was ready to be ground into flour. As there was not a flour mill within a hundred miles, they then ground the wheat into flour in coffee grinders. This was a hard tedious task and even little John and Hugh took turns at turning the grinder. They learned to make corn into hominy. This constituted the main items of their diet that winter.

In the spring of 1854 the workshops were moved back onto the grounds of the State House, where work was resumed. By December 1, 1854, all the walls and masonry work was done on the State House.

George Arthur Rowley tells us in one of his histories: “During the summer of 1854 Ralph Nephi Rowley discovered the sulphur beds which are located about seven miles south and east of Cove Fort in south Millard County. He hauled sulphur in the raw state and sold it to Brigham Young in Salt Lake City. He made many trips into Salt Lake with the sulphur, and on one occasion, Brigham Young paid him a yoke of oxen and wagon for the sulphur. In later years a company with money developed the sulphur beds and put in a refinery to sell sulphur all over.

Ralph Nephi Rowley, had a pottery from 1854 until early 1880. Ralph was a master potter, he was he was also skilled in building kilns. He had learned to make pottery kilns as a boy in England He built a fine pottery just east of the Chalk Creek. In the early stages Ralph did prospecting for clay and other material. illegible volcanic glass, which is the illegible stone and the pumy stone. Ralph assisted in getting them developed illegible the Twin Peaks in south Millard County illegible  bed of the Beaver River, which fed into Sevier Lake, which is south illegible the Twin Peaks are in South Millard County, near the Black Rock station for The Union Pacific Railroad. The river now flows into a reservoir, there illegible not run as far north as it did then illegible plaster of Paris when it becomes hard and dry will absorb water. It makes the best kinds of molds, so he had to have it. He found moutains of of gypsum in the Levan and Nephi Districts. Gypsum is pounded or ground fine like flour and placed in an iron kettle and cooked. When worked just right you can mix it with water and make a paste and let it set for a few minutes and it becomes hard. Plaster of Paris is gypsum in the finished product and gypsum is used in making cement. Illegilble a big plaster works in the illegible  and in the Salt Creek Canyon above illegible John Rowley, who lived in Nephi illegible water mill and ran it for a long illegible (Ralph) found feldspar in good illegible”

Ralph Nephi Rowley was a very brave men to illegible prospecting into country held by Indians and so far away from the protection illegibleoments. He played a very important role in the building up of this country and in many of its industries. He was a good friend to the great Chief Kanosh; this friendship is one of the reasons he was able travel to far places in search of the many different minerals etc. that he needed in his work. Perhaps it was his great faith, illegible he was a man of exceeding great illegible protection that he would receive illegible Mighty.

In 1855 the people of the Fillmore were called upon to practice the United Order, by assigning all their earthy possessions over to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Like Nephi (whose name he had added to his own), he knew that God does not ask a thing of us without providing a way that His commandment might be kept. Ralph humbly and uncomplainingly followed the advice of the Church Presidency to the letter and he signed a paper like the following:

“Be it known by those present that I, Ralph Nephi Rowley, of Fillmore City in the County of Millard and the Territory of Utah, for, and in consideration of the good will which I have for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, give and convey unto Brigham Young, trustee in trust for the said church, his successor in office, and assigns, all my claims and ownership to the following described property, to wit; (Then followed the description of his farm lands and his pottery and whatever lands he had acquired at that time with all livestock he owned, he assigned every single thing he possessed). Together with all rights, privileges and appurtenances there unto, belonging or appertaining. I also covenant and agree that I am the lawful claimant and owner of said property, and will warrant and forever defend the same unto the said trustee in trust, his successor in office, and assigns, against the claims of my heir, assigns or any person whomsoever.

(signed) Ralph Nephi Rowley”

Thus Ralph again stood the test – that he would do all that was asked of him fully and faithfully. What a test, to sign away all that he had or ever hoped to have and to agree to leave all that he had to the Church and not to his ancestors to leave something to their children. We know that he did it gladly and yet what a test it was! Hugh Thompson, Mary Ann’s father, also turned over all that he possessed also, including the 10,000 gold sovereigns that he had brought in the drawer of the heavy oak chest. Converted into United States money, this would have all belonged to Mary Ann and the children at his death, for they were his only heirs. Think of the schooling and prestige, the lands and possessions this would have bought for their descendants. This was gladly given for they knew that the Gospel was true and that they must stand every test! Oh that we, the descendants of these most worthy ancestors could all inherit the TESTIMONY that they had, that this great thing that they did would not have been done in vain. This lesson they gave us that to obey all of gods commandments and to do gladly all that is asks of us, to remain faithful to the end, is a greater inheritance that $50,000.00 or all the riches of the earth! There were others who gave all they had at that time but in my opinion Ralph, Mary and Hugh were put to a greater test for everything was put in a common storehouse and each family got supplies etc. as it was needed. Therefore those who had little would share alike with those who had a greater amount. It was easy for those who had little. The work was divided among all Saints both men and women, thus keeping everyone employed and on the same economic level, which did away with poverty, as well as preventing the accumulation of great wealth, a socialistic form of religion.

The grasshopper made their first appearance and they came in hordes. Ralph and his family watched as they ate nearly all of the crops in spite of anything they could do to stop them.

The grasshoppers came again in 1856 but not in such numbers as they had in 1855 and they were able to control them better so that more of their crops were saved.

Another male child was born to Ralph and Mary Ann, on November 11, 1856. They named him Ralph Nephi Rowley after his father.

The most of the pottery Ralph made at first and a great deal of it at all times, he turned over to Brigham Young or the Church, I suppose it was distributed as seemed best by Brigham Young. There is no record of what Ralph received in payment but it is my opinion that he considered it as a part of the labor he owed in living the United Order.

Ralph’s brother James Rowley left England and arrived in Salt Lake City sometime between December 1 and 15, 1856, in the William Hidgett’s Ox Train Company, which arrived in Salt Lake City in sections – (Journalistic History, December 15, 1856, page3). He came to Fillmore soon after this, where the brothers had a happy reunion. They were closely associated from that time on until James’ early death in 1881. (We have not at this time been able to learn if James came alone, but it is my opinion that he did – the record of his arrival can be found in the archives of the Church Historians office in the Presiding Bishop’s office in Salt Lake City). Ralph must have taken him into the pottery business upon his arrival, for he was also skilled in all things pertaining to the making of pottery, having been taught the trade by his father from the time he was a small lad in England. There are also many stories told of them making the pottery together. James may have made the trip from Salt Lake City to Fillmore by handcart, his son, George Rowley of Fillmore (1957), says he thinks he was told as a child that he did.

In the spring of 1857 Ralph and Mary Ann, with their four children, John, Hugh, Walter and Ralph Jr. went to make a new home in the wilderness south of them, Meadow. Three other families going with them, the Tompkinson’s, (Mrs. Thompkinson was a Rowley, Ralph’s cousin), the Tyler’s and John Lemmons. The James Duncan family had gone before them. They all located on the ridge about a mile west of the present to townite of Meadow. The “Ridge” was a gravely elevation resembling a railroad track grade which extended for miles north and south of where they had settled. The vegetation was mostly sage brush and meadow grass with cedar trees on the foothills. A few wild berries and some wild rabbits and deer.

Ralph and Mary Ann soon made themselves a dugout on the side of the ridge, not far from where the others were building one.

When this was done they began clearing the sage brush from the land, above the settlement, where they had decided  to make the fields.

Their oldest son, John, who was ten years old and Hugh, next younger, who was eight this first summer on the ridge were able to help a great deal in this new enterprise for they, with the boys of the other families were assigned the task of herding the cows, which were herded in one herd. They were also instructed to keep a sharp lookout for Indians. This was hostile Indian country for only a short distance from this place the great Chief Walker laid buried. He had died on this very same Meadow Creek. Before the coming of the Mormon Pioneers this had been a favorite camping ground of the Indians. These Indians were not hostile, but they were feared because of their close connection with Chief Walker.

Ralph was always friendly with Chief Kanosh and his Indians and they shared their scanty food supply with these Indians hoping that the friendship might continue.

That summer and fall they saw many immigrant trains pass. They had built their dugout homes along the ridge a short distance from the main travelled road to California, which came in just below the ridge.

Many of the members of these immigrant trains had helped to persecute and drive the Mormons from Missouri and other places. They did many things to annoy the Mormon Settlers as they passed through their settlements.

One day as John, Hugh and the other boys were herding the cows near the road on the ridge men from the immigrant train took the boy’s lunches from them and even shot at one of the little boys.

-To be continued-