History: Lillian Alcorn

Shortly after Douglas and Vonna were married, I began to teach Vonna how to drive do she could have a little freedom. I soon learned to love Vonna very much. She is very sweet person and seemed to return my love. I shall always remember when she invited me to go with her to a Mothers’ and Daughters’ party. It meant a great deal to me and I appreciate having her close to me. Grace was expecting another baby soon after the first of the year, in January 1957. We were happy for her and also a little concerned. I wanted to go back to Virginia and spend some time with her and help with the tiny one. They were due to go overseas soon after the baby was born and I wanted to see them before they left so with the help of the family we began to plan the trip. However the trip came a little sooner than expected when Don called us on 30 December 1956 to tell us that Grace had had a lovely little girl. The mother and baby were doing fine. They named the baby Lillian Lorraine after her two grandmothers.

With this surprise I left right after the first of the year. I went back on the bus and enjoyed it very much, except for getting pretty tired. I enjoyed being with Grace and the family. They took me to visit many places of interest which had to do with our country’s history. I surely get a thrill out of little Ronnie and the older girls. Ronnie was talking pretty good and I was amazed at how clearly he could pronounce his r’s –especially for a child his age. I spent several weeks with them before coming back home.

I returned home and got back into the routine of things and got caught up on all the things that had gotten behind while I was gone. Then about Mother’s Day, Ralph and his girlfriend, Aleene Sumsion talked to us about getting married. I was very happy about it because I felt that Aleene was a very special person and just the girl to make Ralph happy. They had met at the BYU and Aleene graduated in June 1957 with a degree and a teaching certificate. They planned for her to teach school while Ralph finished his last year at BYU.

Aleene was from Washington State and went home to work for the summer. Ralph had to spend two weeks in Washington with the ROTC program for summer camp and they were able to see each other during this time. They planned to be married 21 August 1957 in the Salt Lake Temple. Ralph and Aleene were both good planners and things seemed to go just as they had anticipated. They were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 21 August 1957. Dwain and Marjorie and others of the family came up for the ceremony and the reception which followed in the 4th Ward in Salt Lake City. Now four of our seven living children had married and all in the Temple.

With the coming of fall we had two lovely new grandchildren born to our children. They were adding up fast now. Marjorie had her little girl Dwana Kay Judkins on 26 September 1957 and Vonna had their first baby, a boy on 4 November 1957. He was named William Douglas Rowley. We are always so grateful when these precious souls come into the world healthy and strong.

The city bus lines had a stop across the street from our house and I would catch the bus right after Grant left for school and go into Salt Lake City and spend the day at the library. I would come home before Grant got home from school. I did a lot of research on Dave’s lines because I had come to a standstill on my own lines. I enjoyed doing this research very much and felt that it was a very important part of our salvation. I only wish I could find more on my own lines and I wish some of my children would take more interest in this wonderful work and help me a little. I also enjoyed taking genealogical courses that were offered through the Stake. (Mother completed three of these courses and the family was given the certificate for the last course the day after her death).

Clayton came home from his mission in June 1958 and had some wonderful experiences to tell us about. He was riding his bicycle one day in Crescent City when he was hit by a car. He received some bad cuts above his eye and on his forehead, but they did a very good job sewing them up because the scars were hardly noticeable. It was wonderful to have him home again.

In April, 1958 Marjorie and I planned and gave a baby shower for Aleene as they were expecting their first baby in May. She was still teaching school and Ralph was still attending the “Y”. Aleene’s principal let her teach for quite a while after he was supposed to let her go which helped them quite a bit. The shower was held in Marjorie’s new home in Orem, Utah.

On 21 May 1958 Aleene gave birth to their baby, a boy, at the Utah Valley Hospital in Provo, Utah. They named him Kurtis Wayne. Ralph was a typical new father, happy and excited and grateful that both his wife and new son were well and had gotten along so well. This brought our number of grandchildren to 9; 5 boys and 4 girls. It surely doesn’t take long for one’s posterity to grow.

Dave was still in construction work and with the fall and winter coming he was soon out of work. Dwain’s father, Leonard Judkins who is a small contractor in Provo, gave Dave work for the winter months of 1958-59. Dave stayed with Dwain and Marjorie and their family. It was hard to be without him during the week, but the boys and I did come down on some weekends and Dave came home on others.

We also came down to spend Christmas 1958 with Marjorie and the family. It was a lovely day and we enjoyed it very much. However, before we came down, Vonna gave birth to their second baby. Scott Calvin, their second son was born 19 December 1958. She was delivered by cesarean section, but got along really well. They were thrilled at his arrival. This made 10 grandchildren, now.

Hugh was getting anxious to go on a mission so he approached the Bishop there in Bountiful and talked to him about going. The Bishopric was happy that he wanted to go and started the ball rolling. Hugh left for the Argentine Mission Field on 9 February 1959. He flew to New York and to Argentina. Again my heart was full for this spiritual blessing of having sons go on missions for the Church. We were still receiving some of the insurance money left us when David was killed in Korea and that helped to support Hugh, as it had Ralph and Clayton.

I was called to be a Visiting Teacher there in the ward soon after we had moved and I do enjoy it very much. It keeps me in contact with the sisters and members of the ward. I also was called to be the Speech Director in MIA and this is another job I really enjoyed. Since all but Grant were gone now I enjoyed working with young people again. It was part of my responsibility to assign all the talks that were given by young people in the ward. This included 2 ½ minute talks in Sunday School, talks in MIA and in Sacrament Meetings. I also taught the lessons that were outlined. I like to feel that the young people liked me as much as I enjoyed them.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

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History: Lillian Alcorn

To help me avoid having to get up out of bed to answer the phone, we had an extension put in my room by the bed. I read and did genealogy and many other things to pass the long, long days that came with each sunrise. I enjoyed my handiwork at this time, too. I did a lot of crocheting and hand sewing.

It did seem good when I was able to get back to Church after months of staying at home. I was able to work in the Relief Society and enjoyed my associations with the sisters very much. I loved to sing and enjoyed singing with the Branch Singing Mothers’ group. There weren’t many of us but we certainly enjoyed singing and were called upon many times to present programs. I also served as the Improvement Era director in the branch and enjoyed going to MIA with the children. All of them except Grant were old enough to attend mutual and so we usually just took him with us anyway. They had an adult class called the Special Interest class.

We were still living quite close to where Melva lived and I was able to see her more often. Then after Douglas graduated from high school in January of 1952 he joined the Air Force and was stationed at Travis Air Force Base which was in the San Francisco Bay area and we made a trip or two to see him also.

We hadn’t been in Eureka very long when we were able to pick up an old piano for about $27.00 and Marjorie started to pick at it. Years before, she had had a girlfriend who took piano lessons and she learned the notes and keyboard from her. She began to pick out pieces and before too long she was able to play for our family enjoyment. Soon she was also playing in Jr. Sunday School, Primary and in MIA. We certainly appreciated having a piano in the home and music available when we wanted it.

We enjoyed living in Eureka very much. There was much in the mission field that was very good for us and the children. The branch was a closely knot unit because in the whole city if Eureka, there were only about 300 of the Latter-Day Saints. The children had many wonderful close friends. The young people of the branch did many things together. They held Fireside Chats twice a month on Sunday evenings after Church. We also had many Church outings together and had wonderful times.

Dave spent part of the time we were there as supervisor of the Fortuna Branch Chapel. This was considered as sort of a Stake Mission Assignment. He enjoyed it very much. While working there one day during the summer of 1952 a family from Utah who had been in an automobile accident came to the chapel. Upon finding out what their situation was, Dave invited them to spend the time it would take to fix their car with us. They were with us about one week. It was Brother and Sister Alfred Jordan and a son, Ray and daughter Amy. We continued to be very good friends and when we visited in Utah in June 1953 we spent several days in their home in Murray, Utah.

In May of 1953, missionaries were sent to the Eureka, Arcata and Fortuna areas. The supervising Elder or District President over the missionaries was an Elder Dwain Judkins from Ephraim, Utah. We had four missionaries in Eureka, two in Arcata and two in Fortuna. They were all under the direction of Elder Judkins.

Shortly after the missionaries came, Clayton who had just graduated from high school, talked to Dave and I about his future. He was concerned because he felt he couldn’t really plan a future until he had his commitment over with Uncle Sam. So he went down and asked for voluntary induction. He went into the Army and was stationed among other places at Fort Bragg, California and Fort Benning, Georgia.

We had made a standing appointment to have the missionaries to dinner each Wednesday evening and every Sunday they didn’t have other appointments. We enjoyed having them in our home because they were a wonderful inspiring influence on our children, especially the boys. At least we thought it was mostly the boys. But after the missionaries were taken out of our area in December of 1953, Dwain Judkins the Supervising Elder went home to Utah and had only been there three weeks when he called our daughter, Marjorie and asked her to be his. She of course, accepted without hesitation.

In the fall of 1953, Ralph went back to Provo, Utah to attend BYU and at a Fireside Chat he learned that he could go on a mission. He wrote home to tell us about it and we contacted President Walter Bingham and President Bradford. They were thrilled over the idea and arrangements were made and Ralph came home and prepared to leave for the mission field. He left in late December 1953. He spent Christmas in the home of Elder Dwain Judkins in Ephraim, Utah. Marjorie had not yet received Dwain’s proposal of marriage at this time, however. Ralph left shortly after Christmas for the East Central States mission field with headquarters in Louisville, Kentucky.

Dave had fallen and hurt his shoulder before Christmas and was out of work and it looked like he would be out of work for some time. Dwain and Marjorie had planned a summer wedding in the Manti Temple. Dave and I felt that they should know each other better, after all, he had been a missionary and a very good one, and she hadn’t seen him in any other environment. We thought that Marjorie and I would go back to Utah for April General Conference and while there spend a few days or a week in Ephraim with Dwain and his folks. Marjorie had a week out of school for Easter vacation and it came at just the right time for the planned trip.

When Dave was still out of work and the time came closer for us to leave, Marjorie received a phone call from Dwain and he asked if they couldn’t be married in April if both Dave and I could be there. Dave hesitated a minute or two and then he said okay. We were invited to ride back with some friends from Fortuna, Frank Adams and his wife. Marjorie and Dwain were married 7 April 1954 in the Manti Temple.

Now we had both of our daughters, two sons in the Armed Services and one on a mission. This left us with only two boys at home. The house seemed quite empty and we had some time getting used to it. Hugh sort of filled in the empty spot Marjorie had left. She had been a big help to me and we were quite close and good companions. Hugh took her place in the house doing much of the work that she had done for me. And Grant, he was always a source of happiness to us. We did enjoy our little family togetherness, and Dave and I were proud of our children away from home.

In the fall of 1954 Grace and Don came home from Germany. Grace was expecting her third baby in November so she stayed with us while Don went on to his duty station. It seemed good to have Grace and the girls in our home for a little while again. We missed her when she was gone and she was gone so much of the time. Well 7 November 1954 came and Grace gave birth to a lovely baby boy. When Dave called Don on the phone, Grace had asked him not to tell Don he had a son because Grace wanted to tell him. But Dave slipped when he said “He is doing just fine,” in answer to Don’s question on how the baby was doing. Don was very happy to finally have a son and they named him Ronald Stephen Smith.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

My only sister Melva was married in 1940 to Robert L. Goe. They were living in Salt Lake City, Utah. In May 1941, I took Marjorie and went to Utah to be with Melva when her first baby was to be born. My brother Leonard drove us in his car to Salt Lake City. Melva’s baby was born 30 May 1941 and was a lovely little girl which they named Karen. Marjorie and I returned after three weeks, on the bus. While we were gone, Grace, who was only 12 years old, took complete charge of the house and prepared the meals for all those boys. She even bottled several quarts of seedless grapes, which by the way, stayed good for years.

About this time the Branch decided to build a new chapel. A plot of ground was selected in town and the work began. It was completed and we moved into a lovely new white chapel. It was good to have more room for classes and a Relief Society room with kitchen facilities. It was good indeed and we certainly appreciated the new building.

We had an old log ice-house on our place and we would get big blocks of ice from the river every winter and fill the ice-house. It would last long into the summer months.

I gave birth to another baby on 14 May 1942. It was a lovely red-haired little girl. She was the first baby I had that was born in a hospital. We named her Sharon Lee Rowley. She was very quiet, sweet and loveable baby and was a real joy to us. This precious baby was not to be ours for very long, at least in mortality. She was a frail baby and we soon learned that she had asthma.

One Sunday morning, 27 September 1942 while Dave and the boys were doing chores, Sharon had a bad choking spell. She couldn’t seem to breath nor stop coughing and choking. I sent Grace after Dave and he sent one of the boys across the ditch for Francis. Dave and Francis got to the house about the same time. By this time, Sharon had from all appearances stopped breathing. Dave took her and I got the consecrated oil and he and Francis administered to her. She still seemed lifeless and Dave began to work her left arm up and down similar to working a pump handle. Within a minute or so she started breathing again and we rejoiced and thanked our Father in Heaven for his blessings to us and for the power of the priesthood which was in our home.

The next day we took Sharon to the hospital in Havre, about 40 miles from Harlem. I was allowed to stay right there with her. Although Sharon had always been a quiet baby and hadn’t smiled much in her short life, she seemed to smile and be quite content there in the hospital. Then on Wednesday, 30 September 1942 in the late afternoon, Dave and I were standing by her crib and she talked, cooed and smiled and seemed to be trying to tell us that this is the way things were supposed to be. She died about 5:00 p.m. that evening. It was a great loss to me and the family. A close friend at the time gave us the following poem in which we found much comfort.

-A PRAYER-

O Father, help me to understand and know the reason why,
The Child that Thou dids’t give to me so early had to die.
Why one who’s life had been so pure, who never knew deceit
Should droop and wither like a flower crushed under ruthless feet.

O Father, help me to understand Thy purpose divine,
In letting death, with ruthless hand, tear her dear heart from mine.
O, let me see the veil beyond where dwells her spirit pure,
And l know she is happy where she had gone, O let me feel secure.

Forgive the surging doubts that rise within my aching heart,
And take the dimness from mine eyes, let darkness all depart.
Let light and knowledge come to me from Heaven, Thy home on high.
O, help me put my trust in Thee, O Father, tell me why!

Perhaps I sin in asking this, more faith should show in thee,
But, Oh I miss her loving kiss, she was so dear to me.
Just let me know that I sometime shall find her once again,
And clasp again her form to me, I as in Jesus’ name, Amen!

-AN ANSWER-

Grieve not, my daughter, for time shall be when death shall be no more,
Thy loved one I’ll return to thee to cherish evermore.
“Twas in the plan that man should die and slumber in the grave,
But rise again as even I, for this my life I gave.

For mortal life is but a part of God’s eternity.
In which the souls of men embark to find felicity.
What men call death is but a step from low to higher plane.
And all who in the dust have slept, though me, shall live again.

Then grieve not for the one that’s gone, let your heart despair,
For God in wisdom called your child to work for Him up there.
The prison gates to open wide for those who died in sin,
And through repentance them to guide, again to worship him.

Let this, then be your answer why, and let your heart rejoice,
for until God they do not die who to His voice.
But walk with Him is realms of love where all the righteous be,
be comforted, for there above, Thy child shall welcome thee!

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

The dressings on Mother’s cancer had to be changed every little while as it was constantly draining. She was in so much pain all the time that her ordinary pleasant disposition was sometimes very difficult to satisfy and I tried hard to do whatever she wanted or to get whatever she needed. Father and the older boys had to be away most of the time making a living. Thinning, weeding and topping beets and most any other kind of work they could do to keep the family together and all healthy. In spite of our efforts after Mother died, Verl was adopted out to the Bishop Perry family and I went into the fields and worked with the rest of the family. So besides caring for the needs of the younger children, Dad and the housework, I was thinning, hoeing and weeding and topping beets with the rest of them.

There was time, now and then, for me to spend with my friends and to enjoy the out of doors. I loved the hills around where we lived and I loved to hike and tramp around these hills. We used to go over to where Indians had lived long ago and inspect the writings that we found on the cliffs there. I have often showed my children and grandchildren these same cliffs and hills and caves that I enjoyed so much as a young girl and lady. They seemed to enjoy exploring them as much as I did. I also enjoyed horseback riding.

In 1924 Dad and I went on a trip to California. The change was good for us and we enjoyed it very much. As we went over the California border we had a sack of oranges with us and they wouldn’t allow us to take them into the state, so we peeled them all and sat there in the car and ate every one of them. I didn’t think I could eat another orange as long as I lived. But I still enjoy them.

In the spring of 1925 after thinning beets until the season was over we decided to go to Harlem, Montana and work for the season and then come back to Utah. But instead of coming back to Utah we rented the Amos Everett Ranch about six and a half miles east of Harlem, Blaine Co., Montana. We farmed 160 acres of ground and as usual I did my share of work in the fields. We thinned, topped and worked in the beets. We also had about 1500 chickens which were my responsibility. The boys did the chore of keeping the coops clean and most of the manual work pertaining to their care and I took care of the rest. Sometimes my work in the house made it impossible for me to do much with the chickens. At these times the boys would fill in and take care of them for me. I appreciated this help very much.

Dad was a good provider and he tried hard to be one with us in going out to dances and socials and etc. He was anxious to see that we all had good times. I was very much afraid of my father and tried awfully hard to do whatever he wanted.

It was while we lived on the Amos Everett ranch that we all went to Church in the LDS Chapel which was 3 ½ miles west of Harlem. We had a nice old chapel, one large room divided into classrooms by curtains. Albert L. Johnson was Branch President with Angus Young and Chris Stuker as counselors and A. Lorenzo Stoddard as Branch Clerk. They asked me to work as a Counselor in the YWMIA with Martha Southwick as President and Alma Turner as 1st Counsellor. Mary Stoddard was the secretary/treasurer.

We had many enjoyable meetings in this little old chapel. It used to be a recreation hall out in the hills northeast of Harlem which our Branch bought. They cut it in two and moved it into the valley and out on the corner of the Jake Everett farm. They put it back together and fixed it up for a meeting place which was used for about twenty years. There was an old-fashioned pot-bellied stove at one end of the building which kept it plenty warm, even on the coldest of days.

I was blessed with a fair singing voice and was called upon quite often to sing in various programs. I enjoyed this very much. Some of my favorite songs were: “The Prisoner’s Song” – “’Twas a Cold Stormy Night” – “What’s the Use of Being Good” – among others. My favorite Christmas song was “Star of the East” which I often sang. I had quite a collection of music but during one of the spring runoff floods of the Milk River I lost all of it which made me very unhappy. Some of the music was not replaceable.

While we were living on the Amos Everett place the family went to a dance in Zurich which was about twenty miles away. We went in the old Ford car. I had become pretty well acquainted with the young people of the area and when a man came up to me and asked for a dance I told him I didn’t know him and I didn’t dance with strangers. Soon a friend, Bert Murphy, came and asked me if I would like to meet a young man and he introduced me to David William Rowley from Lohman, Montana. Lo and behold, this was the same young man who had invited me to dance. He asked around until he found someone who knew me and asked him to introduce us. Well, after this proper introduction I accepted a dance with him and was very much impressed with him, however I didn’t see him again for a long time. Dave told his brother Emerson that night that he had met his future wife.

Sometime later our agricultural field agent came to see us about our farm practices and he was invited to have dinner with us. We all knew Brother Barnes, the field agent, but the man that was with him was Hugh T. Rowley and a stranger. Upon introduction and hearing the name Rowley, I asked if he knew Dave and come to find out he was Dave’s father. I also found out that Dave taught a Sunday School class in the Chinook Branch. At that time though, he was working back in the hills on Clear Creek on the Morrison & Butler farms. Just before I was to serve dinner I discovered I was out of butter and not knowing what to do I put some food coloring in some shortening and passed it off as butter and no one ever knew the difference. This was in the early spring of 1926.

The Rowley’s rented the Colgrove place that spring and moved to Harlem and started to go to the Harlem Branch to Church. I became very well acquainted with Verda, Dave’s only sister. Verda later became the wife of Bert Murphy, the friend who had introduced me to Dave. Verda and I became good friends and I enjoyed her company very much. Dave wasn’t with the family when they moved to Harlem. He was still working on the Morrison & Butler farms. The farms were located about 14 miles southwest of Chinook, Montana and Chinook was about 20 miles from Harlem. It was a large sheep and hay ranch.

Well, My Dad and the boys got the crops in that Spring, mostly beets and potatoes. The crop did very well and the chickens started to lay early and that really helped us in paying our expenses. In May, Dave came home from the Ranch and helped his folks put in their crops and then went back to put up hay for Morrison and Butler. While he was in the valley though, we went out on several dates. With Verda and I as good friends and Leonard and Francis who became good friends we had some very good times together.

I had a lot of responsibility caring for my Mother’s family and I learned to be a hard and fast worker in all I had to do. I cooked and cared for the family and our hired help. One time one of the men made a remark in town that all they had for breakfast at Alcorn’s place was a prayer and cereal. The word got back to me so the next morning all I put on the table was cereal and as usual we had our morning prayer. The hired man asked if that was all we were going to eat and I repeated to him what he had told the fellows in town a few days before, that man learned a good lesson and we all had a good laugh.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger

JOHN THOMPSON ROWLEY AND JANE SMITH FAMILY:
Reported by David S. Rowley and wife, Selma

In the February issue of the paper we made a mistake and would like to correct it now. It is from Irene Jones Peterson: “Gordon, since Sept. 1957 has been with the U.S. Army, first at Fort Ord, and now at Fort McClellon, Alabama. He and Margaret Ruth Lewis were married at Rudley, (reported Rigley) Branch. Gordon was home for Christmas the went to Alabama, Jan. 3. Ruth finished her school term at Rudley College and joined him, March 6th. They are now living at 2202 Gurnee Ave., Anneston, Alabama. There is a small branch of the Church at Anneston, with a new chapel, so Gordon feels right at home. Ruth is soon to join the Church and she sings in the choir! Irene Peterson goes on to say that our little paper is a job and a wonder and that she enjoys it so much and likes to hear how everyone is doing and where they are. May this reporter add that it is a joy to get letters with news in them. I sure wish everyone would follow suit.

Our family surely has good news. In the past 3 ½ months, David and I have become grandparents three times!! On February 9, 1958, our son Jack and his dear wife, Barbara presented us with a grandson. He was born at Victorville, California and weighed 6 lbs. 7 oz. They had him blessed in March 2nd and gave him the name of Jeffery Ray Rowley.

Just 15 days later our daughter, Gayle, who is married to Franklin Dee Wareham gave birth on February 24,  to a lovely little girl. She weighed 6 lbs. 13 oz. her daddy blessed her on March 30, and gave her the name of Linda. Gayle and Franklin went through the Salt Lake Temple on June 7, 1957.

On May 12, 1958, our son, Wayne and very good wife, Annette ??rgeline McAuther, went through the Salt Lake Temple and two weeks later on May 27 a son was born to them. He weighed 6 lbs. 11 oz. His daddy blessed him, July 6, and gave him the name of David Scott Rowley. Both these last two babies were born in Salt Lake City at the L.D.S Hospital.

I forgot to mention in my last report that on December 19, 1957 Gayle went through the Temple and did the endowment work for her sister, Celia Phyllis, who died Sept. 29, 1956 of injuries suffered in an auto accident.

On Monday, June 2, 1958, Fred and Harriet Rowley, Mrs. Sarah Rowley, Mrs. G. A. (Pe??l) Rowley and myself, (Selma Rowley) went to Provo to attend the funeral of Ethel May Bedkett Rowley Beardall. She died on May 29, in Provo.

It was nice to see family members again and chat with them. Seems as if that’s the only tine we get together is on one of these sad occasions. Ethel Jane has a lovely family as does Ruth. Reginald Rowley, who is Aunt Ethel’s second son, and the baby of the family, flew out from Annapolis, Maryland, where he is an instructor at the Naval academy, for his mother’s funeral. He sure looks like the Rowley’s. he is married and has two children.

Aunt Mary Ann Rowley Jones and her daughter, Luella were there, also Manuel, Luella’s husband. Winifred Rowley and his wife, Addie were there. They have five babies now and live in Provo.

Luella and Manuel’s daughter, Rebecca, (Mrs. Neil Adendauh) had a little baby boy (I don’t have the date), at the Dragerton Hospital. He only lived 1 ½ hours. They named him Louis Lee.

William W. and Olive Louis Jones finally got a girl. She was born, May 1, in Salt Lake City and the named her Elizabeth Ann. Such a lovely old name. this young lady is bound to be spoiled and why not, she has five older brothers.

Lenna and Waldo Bushnell and their children came over to Spring Glen to see their mother Mrs. Sarah Rowley, for Easter. Grandma Rowley (Sarah) went to Moab last month (May) to help her daughter, Celia Anderson, who had been in the hospital.

Ralph Alcorn Rowley Obituary

Ralph Alcorn Rowley Obituary
1933 ~ 2015
Ralph Alcorn Rowley died on December 8, 2015 in Provo, Utah, where he had been suffering a lengthy illness. He will be remembered for his family, academic and military achievements and as the Director for Independent Study at Brigham Young University. His firm testimony, congenial personality, dedicated work ethic and allegiance to the United States for which he risked his life for freedom to this nation and other freedom loving countries.
Ralph was born April 14, 1933, in Harlem, Blaine County, Montana, to Lillian Alcorn and David William Rowley. As a child he worked on the family farm of sugar beets and grain and attended schools in Montana until the family moved to Gridley, California where he graduated from Gridley High School in 1950. He attended Brigham Young University and then served a mission to the East Central States for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1953-1955. After his mission he returned to BYU, and completed his Bachelors of Science degree. During his military career he attended the University of New Mexico, earning the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in history.
His Air Force years began at BYU, as a Wing Commander and after graduating from college served in the United States Airforce for 21 years, a career that took him and his family to many places in the world. Because he was on the crew of B-52’s during the Vietnam War and because of his history degrees he spent six years researching the Vietnam War records at the Pentagon and wrote the history that now is in the Library of Congress along with many of his other writings. He and his family were transferred to Germany from 1975 to 1979, where he negotiated treaties in Spain and Germany for NATO forces, then returned to live in Utah.
Following his military career of 21 years, Lt. Colonel Rowley retired and went to work in private business for a short time. In 1980, he was hired by BYU Continuing Education where he worked until he retired.
During his life he served in many callings in the church including being a teacher, a bishop, a high councilman, an MTC Branch President, served a mission to Nauvoo, then taught Visitor’s Center missionaries at the MTC followed by being a Multi-Stake Church Service Missionary coordinator in the Provo area.
Ralph is survived by his wife, Elaine, his two daughters, Kristine (Adrian) Carbine and Janiel (Bruce) Miller, his sons, Kurtis (Paula) Rowley, Lynn (Mark) Andersen and step-sons, Rex, Reed, Kevan, Keith and Quinn Haddock, and also 45 grandchildren and 28 great grandchildren. His daughter, Lorrain (Kelvin) Nilsen died in May of this year.
Funeral Services will be Monday December 21, with a viewing at 12 p.m., just before the funeral at 1 p.m. at the Rock Canyon Ward, 3050 Mojave Lane, Provo, under the direction of Bishop Lin Sherman. Interment will be at the City of Orem Cemetery, 1520 North 800 East, Orem, Utah under the direction of Walker Sanderson Funeral Home. Condolences may be offered to the family online at www.walkersanderson.com

– See more at:

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/deseretnews/obituary.aspx?n=ralph-alcorn-rowley&pid=176886763&fhid=23315#sthash.N2OD77Cg.dpuf