History: David William Rowley

LILLIAN (Lillian Alcorn) – She was a fine woman in so many ways. She was an excellent cook and used to fix us such good meals. She could keep a good house, too. She had a gift for sewing and could make clothes look really well. One winter she made nice shirts for all the boys and me, too. She made most if the clothes for the children (Grace Harriet, David Alcorn, Douglas Alcorn, Ralph Alcorn, Clayton Alcorn, Marjorie Ann, Hugh Alcorn, Sharon Lee and Grant Alcorn Rowley).

My Lillian was a complex person. Some people have said she was a perfectionist and perfectionists are not always easy to live with. I know that I did not always understand her and we did not always get along. I know that sometimes I provoked her and caused her to be frustrated with me. She had had a hard life what with losing her mother (Harriet Ann Weaver) and having a lot of the care of her younger brothers (Lenard Clark, William Vernon, Marvin Ballard, Joseph Lorenzo, Archie Harold, and Jesse Verl Alcorn) and sister (Melva Alcorn) and her thinking was influenced by that way of life.

She has a wonderful voice. I could be in the farthest place away in the field and she could raise her voice and make me hear. They used to tease her and say something about her winning a pig calling contest. It had been so long that I can’t remember the details or just how it was. I heard Grant tell Linda (Linda Roskelley) that when he heard his mother’s voice yelling for him to run when he was playing baseball that it practically lifted him off the ground. She had a good singing voice, too. She sang humorous songs sometimes. I have been trying to remember the names of some of them, but I can’t.

I want my children to know that I still love their mother and want to be with her again. I hope that I can be a good husband to both of my wives (Lillian and Estella Cordelia Tidwell) and that we can live in love and harmony on the other side and work out our eternal lives together.

To be continued…

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History: David William Rowley

Grace (Grace Harriet Rowley) and her family had returned to the United States in December 1959 and we were hoping they would be with us for the holidays, especially Christmas but they couldn’t make it. Lillian (Lillian Alcorn) worked very hard preparing for Christmas and cooking the dinner. The Christmas gathering was at our place that year and it was lovely. Lillian’s brother Harold (Archie Harold Alcorn) and his wife Mary (Mary Gregory Askins) were with us, too.

On 2 January 1960 Lillian had baked cookies and was sewing on an apron when we decided to go into Salt Lake to see Doug (Douglas Alcorn Rowley) and Vonna’s (Vonna Ensign) new baby, Pamela (Pamela Rowley) who was a month old. Clayton (Clayton Alcorn Rowley) had gone out for the afternoon and Grant (Grant Alcorn Rowley) came with us. It was a very cold day and when we got there Doug was working on a flat tire. I stayed with him and Lillian climbed the stairs to their apartment. Pretty soon Douglas said, “Let’s go up, too.” When we got up there we found Lillian lying on the floor. We called Dr. Taylor and the fire department. They couldn’t help. The doctor said she was dead before she hit the floor. Apparently what had happened was that when she got to the top of the stairs and into the apartment she was quite pale, but didn’t seem to be in any trouble. She stepped into the bathroom and it hit her. Vonna heard a thump against the door and she called out, but after no answer she opened the door and Lillian just laid out on the floor. She had fallen against the door in a sitting position with her back against the door. As it opened, she just laid back onto the floor at Vonna’s feet.

She had seen herself lying there, thirty years before in a dream. Lillian had seen herself climbing a long flight of stairs, then she had seen herself looking down at her body and could see loved ones and others trying to revive her.

Lillian had told us that when she died she wanted to be laid beside her mother (Harriet Ann Weaver) so after her funeral on 5 January 1960 she was buried next to her mother in the little cemetery near Penrose and Thatcher, Utah, where she had lived as a child. Her resting place daces the hills she used to climb and ride horses on as a youngster.

Her death came so suddenly and with such a shock. She hadn’t seemed to be ill for a long time. Of course, she had a bad heart attack when we lived in Eureka, California, but she had rested and taken really good care of herself. She had been told that her heart was completely healed. She did get upset over things easily and I suppose this was hard on her. Lillian was a very good person, but she took things too seriously sometimes and got uptight about many things. This might have had something to do with her fatal attack.

Lillian’s funeral was in the Bountiful 3rd Ward chapel and was conducted by our Bishop Norman E. Bowen. The main speaker was Lowell Thomson from Provo who was a very dear friend of ours from Eureka, California. He gave a very fine talk and told about the family and gave some very good tributes to Lillian and the family. Bishop Bowen also gave some lovely tributes to the family and our beloved wife and mother. Bishop Arthur Sperry of the Salt Lake 4th Ward, Temple View Stake also spoke. He had some nice things to say about Lillian and the rest of our family. My niece, Opal Cutler sang, “Beyond the Sunset” and It affected me very much. I remember that song also affected Douglas very much. It was so hard on the children to lose their mother. It was especially hard on the ones who weren’t married because they didn’t have anyone to share their grief.

To be continued…

How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Great-Grandfather: Clark Alcorn – 91
Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Grandmother: Harriet Ann Weaver – 92
Harriet Ann 92 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Grandmother: Lillian Alcorn – 31
Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Lenard Clark Alcorn – 93
Lenard Clark 93 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: William Vernon Alcon – 94
William Vernon 94 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Marvin Ballard Alcorn – 95
Marvin Ballard 95 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn – 96
Joseph Lorenzo 96 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Archie Harold Alcorn – 97
Archie Harold 97 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Aunt: Melva Alcorn – 98
Melva 98 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Jesse Verl Alcorn – 99
Jesse Verl 99 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

History: David William Rowley

The winter we were living on the Merrill place I hitched up the iron gray team. Burt and Duke, and hauled a load of wood. Francis had come over and he was helping me unload the wood. I was working just behind Duke’s single tree when I felt a brush on both sides of me and I ask Francis, “did Duke kick at me?” He said, “He sure did and a foot went on each side of you as slick as a whistle,” and he had a good laugh.

My wife’s relatives lived with us for quite a while, especially her younger sister, Melva and her brother Harold. Her dad was with us for a while, too.

While living on this same place I got up one Sunday morning, it must have been in January or February and the day seemed so sunny and warm that I decided to air out the potato cellar. We had been in Church for a while when I looked out of the window and saw they were frosting up. It was getting cold and I saw a blizzard coming. I left church and hurried home. I shut the doors and put some heat down there. If I had been much longer everything in the cellar would have been frozen. This is an example of how quickly the weather changed in Montana. Some times in the winter it could be really cold when you went to bed and when you got up a Chinook wind would have melted almost all of the snow.

Francis had been living on the Leo Morgan place, but because of this terrible depression he couldn’t make payments so the bank decided to foreclose. They took back the place and sold everything Francis had; and because I had signed with him, they took everything I had too. I asked the bank to sell things on time because people didn’t have money. If they could have had easy payments people would have paid more for out things.

Between Francis and I, we had at least $10,000 in stock and cattle besides the place. They sold out the whole thing for $1,006. A flock of sheep sold for $2.00 a head; big short horned cattle sold for around $15.00 each; a very good four section harrow and a completely overhauled hay stacker (it cost $52.00 just to overhaul it) sold for $6.00 apiece. Then they wanted us to pay the balance of $4,000. We couldn’t, so they sold the note to a Mr. Harbolt in Chinook. About two years later he sold it to Francis and me for $200 cash. We paid it, not because we thought we owed it, but just because we wanted to clear our names.

Franklin D. Roosevelt had been elected President and he started doing things to help the people get back on their feet, such as the NRA (National Recovery Service) and the PWA (Public Works Administration). I went to work for the NRA with a four horse team building reservoirs. The money I earned saved us from starving and going without clothing. The full account of this experience is to be found in the history in the history of Lillian Alcorn Rowley’s life.

Well, after losing all we had in the Leo Morgan episode, we moved back on the farm with the folks. We were better off because I was working on the NRA nine days a month, the rest of the time I could help Dad, trap and such. I was paid $11, a day and I must say that was the biggest money I ever saw I was most grateful for it and it seems like we made it go a long ways.

To be continued…

History: Lillian Alcorn

I get quite tired lately and I am often discouraged, but I have lived a full life and I am grateful for the many things I have experienced in my lifetime. I have been blessed with a wonderful husband who holds and honors the Priesthood. I have born nine wonderful children. I have passed through the sorrow of losing two of them, which sorrow only those who experience can understand. I have seen three sons leave on missions for the Church and two return safely home to us. Yes, I have indeed been blessed. I still enjoy doing my genealogy work, but I wish some of my children would develop more of an interest in it so I would feel good about letting them take it over. Perhaps someday they will realize the importance of the work.

Vonna gave birth to her third child on 2 December 1959. They are so thrilled to get a little girl and they will name her Pamela. They say that she looks like me which is very nice. She certainly will have her hands full with three little ones two and under. I hope Douglas will help her out as much as he can.

Christmas is coming and I am planning to have a lovely family gathering. My brother Harold and his wife Mary and their daughter, Mary Francis will also be here. Grace and Don are in the United States now and as far as I know they, too, will be here for Christmas. I am so busy at the sewing machine lately. I’m making bathrobes for all my grandson and robes for my granddaughters. I hope they enjoy them as much as I am enjoying making them.

We had a lovely Christmas. Marjorie and Dwain came up Christmas Eve and with Harold and Mary here we had a wonderful family night with singing and telling of the true meaning of Christmas. The next morning was one of the excitement and anticipation. It keeps us young to have youngsters around us once in a while. Marjorie and her family had to leave before dinner and I was sorry they did, but Mary was there to help me and she is a good helper. The day was saddened only because Grace and Don didn’t make it home.

Time passed and it was soon New Year’s Day 1960. I baked bread and made some cookies and then did some sewing. The next day, 2 January 1960, I again began to sew as I wanted to finish an apron I had started the day before. I hadn’t been sewing long when the family decided to go into Doug and Vonna’s apartment in Salt Lake City to visit with them. Doug had a flat tire on his car and he wanted Dave to help him fix it. Clayton wanted to go to a movie instead so he went to a show in Bountiful. It was a little late in the afternoon when we finally got away, about 2:30pm or so. When we got to the apartment Dave and Grant stayed downstairs to help Doug fix the tire and I went on upstairs to see the kiddies and Vonna. Little Pamela was only a month old. In fact, it was a month ago to the very day that she was born.

To be continued…

How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Great-Grandfather: Clark Alcorn – 91
Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Grandmother: Harriet Ann Weaver – 92
Harriet Ann 92 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Grandmother: Lillian Alcorn – 31
Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Lenard Clark Alcorn – 93
Lenard Clark 93 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: William Vernon Alcorn – 94
William Vernon 94 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Marvin Ballard Alcorn – 95
Marvin Ballard 95 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn – 96
Joseph Lorenzo 96 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Archie Harold Alcorn – 97
Archie Harold 97 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Aunt: Melva Alcorn – 98
Melva 98 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Jesse Verl Alcorn 99
Jesse Verl 99 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

History: Lillian Alcorn

One Halloween Dad took a load of sugar beets, after dark, down along the row of poplar trees hoping pranksters wouldn’t find them, as he had them all loaded and ready to start for the beet dump early the next morning. Well, the pranksters found the load of beets and unloaded them and tipped the box upside down. Dad was really angry, but he never did find out who the boys were.

While we were living here I started to school again in the fall of 1910 at the Thatcher School. The teacher was still Miss Watt. Horrace Miller drove the school wagon and used to really tease. I remember trying to get back at him by sticking my tongue out at him. Later on in the fall we moved on to the Miller place in the Penrose Ward and I changed schools and attended Penrose. We had one room downstairs and one room upstairs in this house.

The Christmas of 1910 I remember we got nuts and candy in our stockings. Leonard got a pocket knife and I got some material for a dress. Shortly after Christmas we moved to Perry, Box Elder, Utah, which was first known as three-mile creek. It is three miles south of Brigham City. We lived in the north room of the old Mathew’s place kitty-cornered from the LDS Chapel. Uncle Albert and Aunt Dollie Cook Weaver lived in the south room. It was while we lived there that my brother Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn was born. He was born 27 March 1911. I attended school in Perry while we lived there.

Shortly after Lorenzo was born dad took my brothers Leonard and Marvin and myself out to Thatcher and left us with Aunt Fannie Nelson. We all came down with chicken pox while we were there so mother, who was to follow us, stayed in Perry with the baby until we were all over them. Then we moved back in the Vance house and I again started school in Thatcher. It was while on this place that dad filed a homestead on 160 acres of land on the bench west of Penrose.

We always looked forward to the times when we would go into Brigham City where our Grandparents lived. Dad had a very spirited little team of horses, Dick and Bess. We had a one-seated buggy without a top but with a large umbrella fastened to the back of the seat. Mother would dress us up in our Sunday best and off we would go. Usually by the time we get to out Grandparents’ home, we were dusty and dirty and looked as if we hadn’t been cleaned up at all. Mother would hold the baby and maybe a smaller child would sit in the seat between Mother and Dad and on our feet, because Leonard and I would sit on the top of the seat with our feet on the seat.

Dad was always singing. The horses were really a snappy little team and fast trotters. Some of the songs Dad would sing were ‘Lay My Little Shoes Away,’ ‘My Old Kentucky Hills,’ ‘My Mother’s Dear Hands,’ and many others. It was about twenty-five miles into Perry and we lived west and north of there.

While we were living on the Vance place in Penrose another brother was born. Harold Archie Alcorn was born 2 Sept 1914. We were always happy when another baby arrived safely and healthy, but I was getting a little impatient to get a little sister. Well, maybe next time!

To be continued…