How Are You Related To Me?

Paternal Great-Great-Grandfather: Charles Henry Sperry – 46
Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Grandmother: Caroline Webb – 47
Caroline 47 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Uncle: Charles Alonzo Sperry – 48
Charles Alonzo 48 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Uncle: David Arthur Sperry – 49
David Arthur 49 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Aunt: Emily Esther Sperry – 50
Emily Esther 50 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Grandmother: Jeanette Sperry – 16* (Twin)
Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Aunt: Jeanevery Sperry – 51* (Twin)
Jeanevery 51 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Uncle: Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
Henry Melvin 52 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Aunt: Retta Sperry – 53
Retta 53 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Aunt: Emma Della Sperry – 54
Emma Della 54 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Aunt: Lillian May Sperry – 55
Lillian May 55 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Aunt: Eva Pearl Sperry – 56
Eva Pearl 56 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Paternal Great-Great-Aunt: Ruth Sperry – 57
Ruth 57 + Charles Henry 46 – Jeanette 16 – Earl Sperry 7 – Nelson Earl 2 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

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Journal: Jeanette Sperry

1902 (Saturday) – Pearl (Eva Pearl Sperry) and Ruth (Ruth Sperry) came out to see us, the children (Alfred Oscar Lunt Jr and Lillian Lunt) were very pleased to see them.

History: Caroline Webb

She is tatting a table cloth for me; she says she wants to live to finish it. November 16th, she was well enough to return home. Pearl came down from Logan for a week to take care of her. November 24th she went to stay with Jeanette for the winter. Jeanette had a lady to take care of her. Mrs. Bailey comes in three days a week and Lillian goes down there three days a week. Mother is getting her strength back quite rapidly. On Christmas Eve, Mother seemed almost normal again. In the evening, she sat in a big chair in front of a stand on which had been placed a small Christmas tree all trimmed and lighted with fancy candles. Karl and I went down for an hour or two and while we were there, they all opened their Christmas gifts – it seemed to Mother as if almost every-other one was hers and she was thrilled through and through. The following Friday, Mother complained of pain in her side. She said to Jeanette when she returned from work, “I guess this is the end.” She was reminded of how many times she had made that same remark, she said “Yes, I guess I have said it a good many times”. On Sunday, December the 29th, Mother took a sinking spell. Karl and I went down in the afternoon and found her very weak. Art came while we were there. Art and Karl administered to her. In the prayer Art said, “We pray that you will be blessed according to your desire”. After they had finished, she said “I want to get well”. She was lying with her head at the foot of the bed (they had placed her that way after they had brought her from the bathroom thinking it would be handier to care for her). She asked a time or two to turn her around, so after they had all left, Jeanette and I turned her around and she said, “That feels better”. She dropped off to sleep, waking only once during the evening. When she called to Jeanette, she asked, “What time does President Roosevelt talk tonight?” Jeanette said, “He is talking now.” Mother said, “Oh!”…and she went back to sleep without hearing him.

I stayed there all night, as Oscar works at night. Mother had been in the habit of waking Jeanette several times during the night, but this Sunday night she didn’t call at all so Jeanette got up at a quarter of four and found Mother sleeping like a baby, so she didn’t disturb her until five a.m.

Mrs. Daly stayed with Mother on Monday. She slept all day, taking very little nourishment. When I returned to Jeanette’s Monday evening, Mother opened her eyes as I entered the room. I said, “Hello, Mother, how are you?” She said, “Hello, who is it?” I answered, “It’s Esther, don’t you know me?” she said, “Oh, of course I do, it is a little dark in here and I couldn’t tell.” She dropped off to sleep again and her breathing was regular, but a little quicker than usual, so we decided not to go to bed but just curl up in the big chairs in the room where she was. We opened our eyes with every move she made. She didn’t wake up all night. Earlier in the evening she mumbled that she was hungry, so Jeanette gave her a spoonful of gruel. The last mouthful she could hardly swallow. She said there was a lump in her throat which made it hard for her to swallow. Before settling for the evening we noticed she looked uncomfortable, so we stirred her pillows and moved her more toward the center of the bed. We found her pillow to be quite wet. After we changed it getting her comfortable she looked contented and happy though a little blue around her mouth.

Tuesday morning Mother was still sleeping with regular breathing. I got ready to go to work and Jeanette prepared breakfast. Just before we sat down to eat; I stepped into the room where Mother was sleeping. Her breathing had changed. I called Oscar and Jeanette to come quickly as Mother’s condition changed. Oscar said, “Mother is dying.” Jeanette rushed to the phone and called Art and Dr. Callister…before she had completed her calls, Mother had passed away.

To be continued…

History: Caroline Webb

Pearl was in the hospital, having had been operated on for appendicitis, this was the reason for their making the trip. One day Wallace and Father went out on the foothills to hunt rabbits. Father had walked quite a distance that day and he became dizzy. He sat on a rock to rest. The dizziness passed off and they started to hunt again. Father killed two more rabbits; cut off their ears to get the bounty paid for by the state, when he felt the dizziness coming on again. Wallace said, “Put your arm around my neck” and Wallace put his arms around Father. Father sank down to the ground and passed away without another word. (A lovely was to go but a great shock to the family). Mother and Ruth lived in the old home for a few years, then Mother sold the home and has since lived among her children.

On September thirtieth, 1940, Mother went to the L.D. S. Hospital for an operation to remove a growth from her neck. She was on the operating table for one hour and fifteen minutes with only local anesthetics. The growth proved to be cancer, which was deeper-seated than the doctor had thought – the kind which wraps itself around the arteries and strangle them. It had almost reached the stage of doing that very thing. After cutting out the cancer, the doctor burned the cut ends in the hope of stopping further growth. Time will prove that. She remained in the hospital six days then returned home feeling fine. She was home just six days when she came down with pneumonia. She was taken back to the hospital again on October the twelfth 1970 where she remained for five weeks. She was in a very critical condition and was placed under an oxygen tent for many days; the cost of same was $47.50. She reacted to it favorably and began to revive which was a surprise to all of her attendants. The first time I went to see her, something whispered in my ear, “Mother will get well”. The next time I went there the same thing happened again and at this time we wouldn’t have been surprised to hear of her passing, she was so critically ill. The doctors and nurses marveled at her recovery. They all treated her grand. One nurse said she had brought a beautiful spirit into the hospital. Another nurse said she was an inspiration to her and should be to everybody.

To be continued…

History: Caroline Webb

Dancing was one of the main amusements for the young people. Father played the violin for the dances starting at the age of twelve; he continued to play for dances as long as he lived. The dances were held in homes at first. Mother remembers the first dance Father took her to – they were very young. He wanted her to sit on his lap while he played the violin and she did (bold maiden). She said she wore a red apron. When the dance had ended, they walked home together reaching Father’s home first; he said “goodnight” and went in, leaving Mother to go home alone. They both thought it was all right. One of his older sisters was outside and saw it all. How she did tease him, but it also taught him a lesson.

They kept company for many years and were married in the Endowment House, November 13, 1871 by Daniel H. Wells.

Later in Father’s life, his dance orchestra became known over the whole state. His accent, rhythm and lively music made people dance whether they had intended to or not. Members of his own family played with his orchestra – Lon with the Violin and Art with the Cello. Later, Jeanette and I played the piano. We took turnabout, dancing half time and playing half time. We used to take trips out-of-town, playing every night. We played Provo, Lehi, American Fork, Santaquin, Mona, Eureka, Mammoth, Silver City, Goshen, Juab, Beaver, Frisco, Milford, Ephraim, Manti, Moroni, Gunnison, Scipio, etc. After Jeanette and I were married, Ruth took it up, playing the piano.

When the railroad came into Salt Lake City, Mother came up from Nephi to see it. It was such a marvel and a wonder she could hardly believe her eyes. Such a huge, puffing monster, running on rails, propelled by steam!

Father and Mother came into Salt Lake to attend the dedication of the Salt Lake Temple. It took forty years to build it.

Father and Mother had eleven children[1] including one pair of twin girls. One of the girls died when only eight months old. That was the only child they lost. Their oldest son, Lon, died when he was forty years old. It meant a great deal of hard work for both of them to feed and clothe such a group and with insufficient means the task was much harder. Father died at a fairly young age. He was sixty-four when he died.

He and mother took a trip to Salina to visit with their daughter, Pearl, who married Wallace Vickers. Wallace was teaching school in Salina. They stopped off in Manti to visit with Harry Sperry and his wife, Aunt Sarah. Mother and Father had a lovely visit with Uncle Harry and Aunt Sarah and promised them that they would visit them on their return from Salina. Father made them (Uncle Harry and Aunt Sarah) a promise they could come down to Salina and visit them there and that they could also have a visit with Burns Miller.

To be continued…

[1] Their children were: Charles Alonzo, David Arthur, Emily Esther, twins: Jeanette and Jeanevery, Henry Melvin, Retta, Emma Della, Lillian May, Eva Pearl and Ruth Sperry. Jeanevery was the twin that died.

History: Caroline Webb

CAROLINE WEBB
MOTHER’S MEMORIES OF THE PAST, WHEN 89 YEARS OLD
Written by a Daughter
Esther Farnsworth – in 1940

Alfred Oscar Lunt; Oscar (15) – Son-in-Law (Husband of Daughter Jeanette Sperry)
Amelia Emily Webb (132) – Sister
Caroline Knowles; Auntie – Father 2nd wife (in polygamy)
Caroline Webb (47) – Self
Charles Alonzo Sperry (48) – Son
Charles Henry Sperry (46) – Husband
Charles Sperry; Grandfather Sperry (117) – Father-in-Law
David Arthur Sperry; Art (49) – Son
David Webb; Grandfather Webb (129) – Father
Emily Esther Sperry; Esther (50) – Daughter
Emma Della Sperry; Della  (54) – Daughter
Esther Olpin (130) – Mother
Eva Pearl Sperry; Pearl (56) – Daughter
Gertrude Barton (1108) – Daughter-in-Law (Wife of Son David)
Henry Melvin Sperry (52) – Son
Jeanette Sperry (16) – Daughter
Jeanevery Sperry (51) – Daughter
Karl Farnswoth (1112) – Son-in-Law (Husband of daughter Emily)
Lillian May Sperry (55) – Daughter
Mary Emily Sperry (121) – Sister-in-Law (Husband Charles Henry Sperry’s Sister)
Miles Harrison Sperry; Harry (122) – Brother-in-Law (Husband Charles Henry Sperry’s Brother)
Retta Sperry (53) – Daughter
Ruth Sperry (57) – Daughter
Sarah Edmunds – Sister-in-Law (Wife of Miles Harrison Sperry)
Sarah Elizabeth Sperry (120) – Sister-in-Law (Husband Charles Henry Sperry’s Sister)
Sarahanna Webb – Half-Sister (daughter of Father and 2nd wife)
Son Webb (131) – Brother
Wallace Joseph Vickers (1128) – Son-in-Law (Husband of daughter Ruth Sperry)

To be continued…

Journal: Jeanette Sperry

1902 (Saturday) – I kept his children home all day, Ruth (Ruth Sperry) and Pearl (Eva Pearl Sperry) came out and Ruth stayed all night, Alfred (Alfred Oscar Lunt Jr) is always glad to see them.