How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Great-Grandfather: Clark Alcorn – 91
Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Grandmother: Harriet Ann Weaver – 92
Harriet Ann 92 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Grandmother: Lillian Alcorn – 31
Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Lenard Clark Alcorn – 93
Lenard Clark 93 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: William Vernon Alcon – 94
William Vernon 94 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Marvin Ballard Alcorn – 95
Marvin Ballard 95 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn – 96
Joseph Lorenzo 96 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Archie Harold Alcorn – 97
Archie Harold 97 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Aunt: Melva Alcorn – 98
Melva 98 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Jesse Verl Alcorn – 99
Jesse Verl 99 + Clark 91 – Lillian 31 – Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

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History: David William Rowley

The winter we were living on the Merrill place I hitched up the iron gray team. Burt and Duke, and hauled a load of wood. Francis had come over and he was helping me unload the wood. I was working just behind Duke’s single tree when I felt a brush on both sides of me and I ask Francis, “did Duke kick at me?” He said, “He sure did and a foot went on each side of you as slick as a whistle,” and he had a good laugh.

My wife’s relatives lived with us for quite a while, especially her younger sister, Melva and her brother Harold. Her dad was with us for a while, too.

While living on this same place I got up one Sunday morning, it must have been in January or February and the day seemed so sunny and warm that I decided to air out the potato cellar. We had been in Church for a while when I looked out of the window and saw they were frosting up. It was getting cold and I saw a blizzard coming. I left church and hurried home. I shut the doors and put some heat down there. If I had been much longer everything in the cellar would have been frozen. This is an example of how quickly the weather changed in Montana. Some times in the winter it could be really cold when you went to bed and when you got up a Chinook wind would have melted almost all of the snow.

Francis had been living on the Leo Morgan place, but because of this terrible depression he couldn’t make payments so the bank decided to foreclose. They took back the place and sold everything Francis had; and because I had signed with him, they took everything I had too. I asked the bank to sell things on time because people didn’t have money. If they could have had easy payments people would have paid more for out things.

Between Francis and I, we had at least $10,000 in stock and cattle besides the place. They sold out the whole thing for $1,006. A flock of sheep sold for $2.00 a head; big short horned cattle sold for around $15.00 each; a very good four section harrow and a completely overhauled hay stacker (it cost $52.00 just to overhaul it) sold for $6.00 apiece. Then they wanted us to pay the balance of $4,000. We couldn’t, so they sold the note to a Mr. Harbolt in Chinook. About two years later he sold it to Francis and me for $200 cash. We paid it, not because we thought we owed it, but just because we wanted to clear our names.

Franklin D. Roosevelt had been elected President and he started doing things to help the people get back on their feet, such as the NRA (National Recovery Service) and the PWA (Public Works Administration). I went to work for the NRA with a four horse team building reservoirs. The money I earned saved us from starving and going without clothing. The full account of this experience is to be found in the history in the history of Lillian Alcorn Rowley’s life.

Well, after losing all we had in the Leo Morgan episode, we moved back on the farm with the folks. We were better off because I was working on the NRA nine days a month, the rest of the time I could help Dad, trap and such. I was paid $11, a day and I must say that was the biggest money I ever saw I was most grateful for it and it seems like we made it go a long ways.

To be continued…

Updates

This Day In Our Family History; April 9, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Elizabeth Martin – 258
  • John Martin Pitt – 109
  • Matthew Pitt – 257
  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Darliston, Shropshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 9, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • John Edgar Lunt – 45
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Caroline Webb – 47

This Day In Our Family History; April 9, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Abigail Bishop – 945
  • Mary Curnock – 299
  • Elizabeth Martin – 258
  • Elizabeth Olpin – 306
  • Samuel Olpin – 298
  • John Martin Pitt – 109
  • Matthew Pitt – 257
  • Aaron Sperry – 944
  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Darliston, Shropshire, England, United Kingdom
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 10, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 10, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Madera, Madera, California, United States
  • Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States
  • Sunset, Davis, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 10, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Caroline Webb – 47

This Day In Our Family History; April 10, 2018

Changed Jesse Verl Alcorn Perry to Jesse Verl Alcorn

Added Categories:

  • Jesse Verl Alcorn – 99
  • Harriet Gibbons – 68
  • Rhoda Ann Webb – 138
  • Madera, Madera, California, United States
  • Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States
  • Sunset, Davis, Utah, United States

This Day In Our Family History; April 11, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 153
  • Ann Elizabeth Harper – 157
  • Benjamin Harper – 153
  • Holborn, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
  • Heber, Wasatch, Utah, United States
  • 1984

Deleted Category:

  • 1884

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 11, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 11, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn – 96
  • Melva Alcorn – 98
  • Coral Lorraine Bolton – 28
  • Abraham Brand – 320
  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 154
  • William Phipps Brand – 330
  • Ann Elizabeth Harper – 157
  • Benjamin Harper – 153
  • Ann Phipps – 321
  • Soham, Cambridgeshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Holborn, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
  • Contra Costra County, California, United States
  • PORTL – Portland Oregon Temple; Lake Oswego, Clackamas, Oregon, United States
  • Baptized On This Day

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 12, 2017

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Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Emma Elizabeth Webb – 133

This Day In Our Family History; April 12, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Ralph Alcorn Rowley – 34
  • Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, United States
  • Castle Gate, Carbon, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 12, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Sarah Elizabeth Sperry – 120
  • Emma Elizabeth Webb – 133

This Day In Our Family History; April 12, 2018

Changed birth information for Logan Christopher Breck to Happy Birthday

Added Categories:

  • Elizabeth Ann Lunt – 42
  • George William Lunt – 44
  • Ralph Alcorn Rowley – 34
  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Melinda Sperry – 509
  • Slimbridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, United States
  • Buried On This Day
  • Happy Birthday!

This Day In Our Family History; April 13, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
  • Lehi, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 13, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Charles Sperry – 117
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 13, 2018

Changed death information for Rhoda Ann Webb to burial information

Added Categories:

  • Phebe Collett – 499
  • Ann Perry – 265
  • William Perry – 498
  • Rhoda Ann Webb – 138
  • Willenhall, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Buried On This Day
  • Sealed To Spouse On This Day

Deleted Category:

  • Died On This Day

This Day In Our Family History; April 14, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Lillian Alcorn – 31
  • David William Rowley – 30
  • Ralph Alcorn Rowley – 34
  • Harlem, Blaine, Montana, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 14, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Journal: Jeanette Sperry
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Charles Alonzo Sperry – 48
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 14, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Lillian Alcorn – 31
  • Darlene Lunt Holman – 1645
  • George Thornton Holman – 1644
  • Eva Ruth Lunt – 20
  • David William Rowley – 30
  • Ralph Alcorn Rowley – 34
  • Moses Sperry – 508
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Lake View, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 15, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 15, 2017

Deleted Italics

Added Categories:

  • Clark Alcorn – 91
  • Harriet Ann Weaver – 92
  • Logan, Cache, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 15, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Journal
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 15, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Clark Alcorn – 91
  • Elizabeth Lamont Sperry – 278
  • Harriet Ann Weaver – 92
  • England, United Kingdom
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

This Day In Our Family History

1835

William Phipps Brand was born in Soham, Cambridgeshire, England, United Kingdom to Abraham Brand and Ann Phipps. He was the 10th of 11 children, and the 6th of 6 sons, born to the couple

1857

Ann Elizabeth Harper was born in Saint Andrew Easter, Holborn, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom to Benjamin Harper and Elizabeth Phipps Brand. She was the 4th of 7 children, and the 1st of 3 daughters, born to the couple

1933

Esther, Anna, Tamar and Abigail Sperry were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1935

Mary Bishop completed her endowments for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1944

Orba Mae Alcorn was born to Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn and Erma Mae Hulse

1980

Melva Alcorn died in Contra Costa County, California, United States

1984

Cora Elizabeth Young died in Heber, Wasatch, Utah, United States

2001

Jane Maurine Snell died in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

2009

Vera Viola Powelson died in American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

2013

John Joseph Everhard and Coral Lorraine Bolton were sealed for time and eternity, by proxy, in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints’ Portland Oregon Temple, which is located at 13600 Kruse Oaks Boulevard in Lake Oswego, Clackamas, Oregon, United States

History: Lillian Alcorn

The Relief Society helped out at home very much, although Marjorie took over the major portion of the work and cooking. Ralph liked to tease her by saying that he lost over 7 pounds with her cooking. While I was in the hospital, which was over six weeks, Marjorie also had to buy Grant’s school clothes. She did a fine job except she didn’t allow for him to grow. By the time school was half over they were all too small and we had to get him some more.

When the time came for me to come home from the hospital the doctors wanted someone to be there with me and to help with the work and worry. So we made arrangements for Grace to come and stay with us and help me. She came from Virginia where they were stationed. Soon after she came with her two little girls, Don was given an overseas assignment, but he was unable to take his family with him right at first, so Grace and the girls stayed there in Eureka with us. After I was back on my feet a little, Grace and the girls decided to find an apartment and she went to work as a waitress in a local drive-in.

To help me avoid having to get up out of bed to answer the phone, we had an extension put in my room by the bed. I read and did genealogy and many other things to pass the long, long days that came with each sunrise. I enjoyed my handiwork at this time, too. I did a lot of crocheting and hand sewing.

It did seem good when I was able to get back to Church after months of staying at home. I was able to work in the Relief Society and enjoyed my associations with the sisters very much. I loved to sing and enjoyed singing with the Branch Singing Mothers’ group. There weren’t many of us but we certainly enjoyed singing and were called upon many times to present programs. I also served as the Improvement Era director in the branch and enjoyed going to MIA with the children. All of them except Grant were old enough to attend mutual and so we usually just took him with us anyway. They had an adult class called the Special Interest class.

We were still living quite close to where Melva lived and I was able to see her more often. Then after Douglas graduated from high school in January of 1952 he joined the Air Force and was stationed at Travis Air Force Base which was in the San Francisco Bay area and we made a trip or two to see him also.

We hadn’t been in Eureka very long when we were able to pick up an old piano for about $27.00 and Marjorie started to pick at it. Years before, she had had a girlfriend who took piano lessons and she learned the notes and keyboard from her. She began to pick out pieces and before too long she was able to play for our family enjoyment. Soon she was also playing in Jr. Sunday School, Primary and in MIA. We certainly appreciated having a piano in the home and music available when we wanted it.

We enjoyed living in Eureka very much. There was much in the mission field that was very good for us and the children. The branch was a closely knot unit because in the whole city if Eureka, there were only about 300 of the Latter-Day Saints. The children had many wonderful close friends. The young people of the branch did many things together. They held Fireside Chats twice a month on Sunday evenings after Church. We also had many Church outings together and had wonderful times.

To be continued…

History: Lillian Alcorn

Before we left Gridley, we had received word that David’s body was being sent home and we could plan a funeral. After we moved, we notified the Army and shortly after we had settled in Eureka, David’s body arrived. We moved in July of 1950 and David’s body came just a few weeks after. His body was escorted by a very nice military escort. We had a lovely funeral and because we didn’t know too many people we hadn’t expected many to attend, but there was a nice group of people there. The main speaker was Lowell Thompson, who has proven to be a life-long friend ever since we met him in Eureka.

David was buried in a lovely cemetery (Ocean View Cemetery) with full military rites. The cemetery was not far from our home in Eureka. There was a lovely view of the ocean from his plot and it was a restful place.

In August, we were attending MIA as usual and enjoyed the activities that it offered. The branch usually had a dance after class time each week. This one Tuesday evening in August Dave and I had danced a fast member. I was a little out of a breath when we finished, but nothing too unusual. I felt tired as I had worked hard that day and we decided to leave MIA early. When I got to the car I was having pains in my chest and by the time the family got there the pain was getting quite severe and spreading down my left arm. I told Dave that we had better hurry and get home as I didn’t feel at all well. I frightened Dave and he drove as fast as he dared. On the way home we passed the General Hospital and the pain was getting so bad that I could hardly stand it. Dave decided we had better stop at the hospital and find out what the trouble was. When we got there he jumped out of the car and came over to my side and opened the door to help me. He reached for me and I remember saying “Oh, Dave, I’m gone!” Then everything went black. I went limp and slipped right through Dave’s arms and skinned my knees on the gravel. In the meantime, Dave sent Marjorie and Hugh into the hospital for help. They were so excited that the attendants couldn’t understand them so they just followed the kids out to the parking lot. They got me into the hospital and into bed and contacted the doctors.

Dave called the chapel and President Walter Bingham, the Branch President came and took the children home. The doctors told Dave that I had had a heart attack, a coronary thrombosis. They also told him that the first crises would pass in 24 hours. I was in an oxygen tent. If I survived the first 24 hours, the next crises would be 72 hours. If I passed that I would probably survive.

An unusual dream came to me during this crucial time. I dreamed I saw my mother in an old-time buggy. She seemed to be very happy and was going someplace singing. I didn’t know just where it was she was going, but she was singing. I wanted very much to go with her and held out my arms to her. She told me that I wasn’t ready to come and that I was needed at home. I remember being very disappointed because I had to stay behind. Shortly after this dream I passed the 72 hour crises and was on my way to recovery.

Ralph and Clayton had been working in Montana at the time of this attack, and I asked Dave not to send for them, but of course he did. They came home as fast as they could. Dave also contacted my sister Melva and she came up for a few days to help out at home. Elder Delbert L. Stapley was in Eureka attending a district conference while I was still in the hospital so Dave arranged for him to come and give me a blessing. I appreciated this very much.

To be continued…

History: Lillian Alcorn

In the summer of 1939 Dave bought a good high-roofed barn from up north of Zurich for $250, and then hired Carl Dolovan to move it down on the farm for us. Dave had the foundations all poured and ready and they set the barn right on the foundations. Dave then fixed it up. He made half of it for the cows and the other half was fixed to handle two teams of horses and a grain bin. It also had a hay loft which held almost enough hay for the whole winter. When we bought the house it didn’t have many cabinets or working space, and I needed more. Dave looked around at some that other people had and then built a lovely set of cabinets for me. We had a nice kitchen sink, although we didn’t have a drain for it. I used to keep a five gallon bucket under the sink to catch the water and then the kids would dump it for me. We didn’t have running water so there wasn’t too much danger of the water running over.

My only sister Melva was married in 1940 to Robert L. Goe. They were living in Salt Lake City, Utah. In May 1941, I took Marjorie and went to Utah to be with Melva when her first baby was to be born. My brother Leonard drove us in his car to Salt Lake City. Melva’s baby was born 30 May 1941 and was a lovely little girl which they named Karen. Marjorie and I returned after three weeks, on the bus. While we were gone, Grace, who was only 12 years old, took complete charge of the house and prepared the meals for all those boys. She even bottled several quarts of seedless grapes, which by the way, stayed good for years.

About this time the Branch decided to build a new chapel. A plot of ground was selected in town and the work began. It was completed and we moved into a lovely new white chapel. It was good to have more room for classes and a Relief Society room with kitchen facilities. It was good indeed and we certainly appreciated the new building.

We had an old log ice-house on our place and we would get big blocks of ice from the river every winter and fill the ice-house. It would last long into the summer months.

I gave birth to another baby on 14 May 1942. It was a lovely red-haired little girl. She was the first baby I had that was born in a hospital. We named her Sharon Lee Rowley. She was very quiet, sweet and loveable baby and was a real joy to us. This precious baby was not to be ours for very long, at least in mortality. She was a frail baby and we soon learned that she had asthma.

One Sunday morning, 27 September 1942 while Dave and the boys were doing chores, Sharon had a bad choking spell. She couldn’t seem to breath nor stop coughing and choking. I sent Grace after Dave and he sent one of the boys across the ditch for Francis. Dave and Francis got to the house about the same time. By this time, Sharon had from all appearances stopped breathing. Dave took her and I got the consecrated oil and he and Francis administered to her. She still seemed lifeless and Dave began to work her left arm up and down similar to working a pump handle. Within a minute or so she started breathing again and we rejoiced and thanked our Father in Heaven for his blessings to us and for the power of the priesthood which was in our home.

The next day we took Sharon to the hospital in Havre, about 40 miles from Harlem. I was allowed to stay right there with her. Although Sharon had always been a quiet baby and hadn’t smiled much in her short life, she seemed to smile and be quite content there in the hospital. Then on Wednesday, 30 September 1942 in the late afternoon, Dave and I were standing by her crib and she talked, cooed and smiled and seemed to be trying to tell us that this is the way things were supposed to be. She died about 5:00 p.m. that evening. It was a great loss to me and the family. A close friend at the time gave us the following poem in which we found much comfort.

To be continued…