History: David William Rowley

The way we put up hay in those days in much different than the way it is done now. It was all done with horses instead of trucks and tractors. We would mow the hay with a horse mower and rake it into windows with a horse-drawn dump rake. Then we would go through and pile it by hand with pitch forks so it would dry out goods. It was then loaded on horse drawn wagons or slips and taken to the stack where it was unloaded with a derrick fork or net. A derrick fork is a large 4 to 6 tines fork about 4 or 5 feet wide. We would push the fork down through the load and have a horse pull it up with the derrick and dump it on top of the stack. There the stacker men would place it where it was needed.

Later we began to use the buck rake and stacker. The buck rake would pick the hay up out of the wind rows or piles and push it onto the stacker which would dump it on top of the stack and then again it would be stacked by a man on top of the haystack who would pile it right and shape the stack. Now it is much different and is all done with tractors and bailed in the field and then hauled in with trucks and tractors.

All things are so much different than they were in my generations when we grew up. Now I don’t suppose there would be many of the young people who would know how to handle horses. One of the first things to know is that one should always work on the left side of the horse so he would always be on your right hand side. This is important both to you and the horse. He’d always be handy to you and he would know what to expect and be prepared to accept the harness, saddle or whatever you were using on him. Horses have been one of the greatest blessings man has ever had out of the entire animal kingdom.

While we were living on the Colgrove place the folks were piling their coal out in the snow. There was an old garage type building setting out in the pasture. The horses would get into it to try to get away from flies and mosquitos and were kicking it apart. So one day when the folks were gone I harnessed a team and went to put some timbers under the garage. I pulled it up to the yard for a coal house. I put it just behind the kitchen door do it would keep the snow out of the coal. The folks were really surprised and happy when they got home on that day!

When I was with my folks in Harlem during the spring and summer of 1926 I attended a dance and was introduced to a girl by a mutual friend, Bert Murphy. Bert later married my sister and became my brother-in-law. The girl’s name was Lillian Alcorn. It is interesting to note that after the dance I told my brother, Emerson, that I had met the girl I was going to marry.

I had wanted to go on a mission for the Church before I got married, but I knew Dad couldn’t send me. In fact he seemed to need most of what I earned for taxes and things. Besides I was too shy to ask to go on a mission, so I didn’t get to go. This has been an ache in my heart ever since.

It was getting cold in the fall of 1926 and I didn’t have any winter clothes. I needed a coat very badly. A neighbor, Sam Taylor needed to go to Idaho to see his sick mother and he asked me to take care of his family, stock and chores while he was away. He paid me $5.00 and I could buy a coat for that, but I also owed that much in tithing. After a small struggle with myself I paid my tithing. A couple of weeks later, Sam’s mother died so I had the opportunity of doing his chores again.  He paid me another $5.00 and I bought my coat. Whenever we do the right thing the Lord always helps us to get what we really need.

To be continued…

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Journal: Grace Harriet Rowley

When Lori (Lillian Lorraine Smith) was about 2 months old we were transferred back to Germany. We stayed there for about three years.  Many happy times were spent in Germany with our little family. We were stationed in Baugh linger, aka, Boblingen.

After returning from Germany, we were sent to Fort Eustis, Virginia for a while. Then Don (Donald Eugene Smith) was sent to Korea and the kids (Cheryl Jeanette, Donna Diane, Ronald Steven and Lillian Smith) and I went to live with Dad (Mom (Lillian Alcorn) had recently passed away) in Bountiful, Utah. We were there with Dad for about 15 months then Don was transferred stateside to Fort Ord in the Monterey, California area. Don was learning Indonesian at the Presidio of Monterey. Don thought after he retired from the Army, we would live in Indonesia and he would work for the Chevron Oil Company. Many found memories of belonging to the LDS ward in Seaside, California. We were in California about a year.  Then Don was transferred to Fort Gordon, Georgia. We were in the Augusta Ward, where Don served in the Bishopric. We lived there just over a year when Don volunteered for duty in Vietnam where he would be training the Vietnamese soldiers fighting the Viet Cong. Don settled us in Bountiful in a nice duplex across from the Bountiful 9th Ward Church before heading to visit his parents in California and then to Vietnam. Don was in Vietnam a few months. I will never forget Friday, November 13th. I was at work cleaning Sister Gadd’s home when Bishop Christensen came to find me. When I opened the door I knew why he was there. He said Grace, I need to talk to you and I replied “It’s Don isn’t it?” he said “Yes” and I said “he’s dead isn’t he?” he again replied “Yes.” We quickly learned, Don was killed when his jeep ran over a land mine. It’s interesting to know that he was found leaning against a tree. Another soldier from Hawaii, Sgt. Hoa was also injured and passed away two days later.

We had Don’s funeral on November 25th. He was buried in the Bountiful Cemetery. Don had told me that he loved Bountiful; he wanted to be buried there if anything happened to him. He knew before he went to Vietnam that he would not come back alive. He told his brother, Gerry Everhard that when he came back it would be in a pine box, then he laughed.

The kids and I spent that lonely Christmas without Don in El Monte, California with his family. We went by train from Salt Lake City to Los Angeles. Don’s Mom (Coral Lorraine Bolton) picked us up at the Los Angeles train depot. All Don’s family was there for that Christmas, even his Grandmother Olive Bolton (Olive Dove Doke) from Modesto, California. It was the last time we saw Lorraine’s beautiful Christmas scene that covered half her living room. The kids loved it and spent several hours laying in front of the scenes, day dreaming about the past and the future.

Updates

This Day In Our Family History; April 9, 2017

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  • Elizabeth Martin – 258
  • John Martin Pitt – 109
  • Matthew Pitt – 257
  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Darliston, Shropshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 9, 2018

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  • Journal
  • John Edgar Lunt – 45
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Caroline Webb – 47

This Day In Our Family History; April 9, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Abigail Bishop – 945
  • Mary Curnock – 299
  • Elizabeth Martin – 258
  • Elizabeth Olpin – 306
  • Samuel Olpin – 298
  • John Martin Pitt – 109
  • Matthew Pitt – 257
  • Aaron Sperry – 944
  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Darliston, Shropshire, England, United Kingdom
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 10, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 10, 2017

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  • Madera, Madera, California, United States
  • Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States
  • Sunset, Davis, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 10, 2018

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  • Journal
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Caroline Webb – 47

This Day In Our Family History; April 10, 2018

Changed Jesse Verl Alcorn Perry to Jesse Verl Alcorn

Added Categories:

  • Jesse Verl Alcorn – 99
  • Harriet Gibbons – 68
  • Rhoda Ann Webb – 138
  • Madera, Madera, California, United States
  • Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States
  • Sunset, Davis, Utah, United States

This Day In Our Family History; April 11, 2017

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  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 153
  • Ann Elizabeth Harper – 157
  • Benjamin Harper – 153
  • Holborn, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
  • Heber, Wasatch, Utah, United States
  • 1984

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  • 1884

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 11, 2018

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  • Journal
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 11, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn – 96
  • Melva Alcorn – 98
  • Coral Lorraine Bolton – 28
  • Abraham Brand – 320
  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 154
  • William Phipps Brand – 330
  • Ann Elizabeth Harper – 157
  • Benjamin Harper – 153
  • Ann Phipps – 321
  • Soham, Cambridgeshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Holborn, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
  • Contra Costra County, California, United States
  • PORTL – Portland Oregon Temple; Lake Oswego, Clackamas, Oregon, United States
  • Baptized On This Day

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 12, 2017

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  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Emma Elizabeth Webb – 133

This Day In Our Family History; April 12, 2017

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  • Ralph Alcorn Rowley – 34
  • Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, United States
  • Castle Gate, Carbon, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 12, 2018

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  • Journal
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Sarah Elizabeth Sperry – 120
  • Emma Elizabeth Webb – 133

This Day In Our Family History; April 12, 2018

Changed birth information for Logan Christopher Breck to Happy Birthday

Added Categories:

  • Elizabeth Ann Lunt – 42
  • George William Lunt – 44
  • Ralph Alcorn Rowley – 34
  • Henry Melvin Sperry – 52
  • Melinda Sperry – 509
  • Slimbridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, United States
  • Buried On This Day
  • Happy Birthday!

This Day In Our Family History; April 13, 2017

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  • Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
  • Lehi, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 13, 2018

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  • Journal
  • Charles Sperry – 117
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 13, 2018

Changed death information for Rhoda Ann Webb to burial information

Added Categories:

  • Phebe Collett – 499
  • Ann Perry – 265
  • William Perry – 498
  • Rhoda Ann Webb – 138
  • Willenhall, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Buried On This Day
  • Sealed To Spouse On This Day

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  • Died On This Day

This Day In Our Family History; April 14, 2017

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  • Lillian Alcorn – 31
  • David William Rowley – 30
  • Ralph Alcorn Rowley – 34
  • Harlem, Blaine, Montana, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 14, 2018

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  • Journal
  • Journal: Jeanette Sperry
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Charles Alonzo Sperry – 48
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 14, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Lillian Alcorn – 31
  • Darlene Lunt Holman – 1645
  • George Thornton Holman – 1644
  • Eva Ruth Lunt – 20
  • David William Rowley – 30
  • Ralph Alcorn Rowley – 34
  • Moses Sperry – 508
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Lake View, Utah, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 15, 2017

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  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 15, 2017

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  • Clark Alcorn – 91
  • Harriet Ann Weaver – 92
  • Logan, Cache, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; April 15, 2018

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  • Journal
  • Alfred Oscar Lunt – 15
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; April 15, 2018

Added Categories:

  • Clark Alcorn – 91
  • Elizabeth Lamont Sperry – 278
  • Harriet Ann Weaver – 92
  • England, United Kingdom
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Grace Harriet Rowley

When Donna (Donna Diane Smith) was still little we moved to Virginia to live before Don (Donald Eugene Smith) was transferred to Trieste, Italy. We lived there for about two years. I don’t remember a lot about Italy, but it was beautiful. We had only been there for a short time when there was a jazz band playing in the street. I didn’t know what was going on so I went out and got the girls. I later found out that it was a funeral procession and that was the traditional way they did funerals in Italy. One time while living in Trieste, Don called Donna to come in when Cheryl (Cheryl Jeanette Sperry) came in instead. Don asked her why she had come when he had called her sister Donna to come in. Cheryl said she wasn’t sure if she was Cheryl or Donna, and she wanted to mind.

After we left Italy, we were transferred to Frankfurt, Germany. While in Germany I was about 6 months pregnant with Ron (Ronald Steven Smith). We lived on the 2nd and 3rd floor of the apartment building. Cheryl was about 5; she came running up the stairs screaming. Don and I went to see what in the world was wrong. Cheryl was upset because there were some ants climbing on her. Don got mad and spanked her for scaring me to death. I don’t remember ever running like that. We had an interesting event happen while we were living in Germany. I inadvertently got the missionaries drunk. It was Christmas Eve. We had invited the LDS service men and the missionaries over for Christmas Eve dinner (I bet Mom made her famous spaghetti. She was known to make a whole roaster pan full for family and friends). As a Christmas gift, we had been given a lovely box of German chocolates for Christmas. We had them out to share with our guests. At the time we did not read or speak much German and didn’t know that the main ingredient in the chocolates was either cognac or rum. Needless to say, I was really embarrassed.

We moved back to Eureka, California with my parents about a week before our second son Ronald Steven Smith was born. The doctor told me that if the baby were a girl, he would trade me for a boy. They had four or five sons and wanted a daughter. We didn’t have to worry because Ron was all boy and the doctor was joking anyway.

Ron was always a strong boy. One time when Ron was about five he stepped on a nail. They had to have his Dad (who was 6’3″) and two other men hold him down to give him a tetanus shot.

We were transferred to New Port News, Virginia when Ron was young. Our 5th child was born there, Lillian Lorraine Smith. When I was about four months along I received a letter from my Mother (Lillian Alcorn). She said it would be very nice to have a granddaughter named after her. So Don decided then that if we had a girl her name would be Lillian Lorraine, after both of her grandmothers, my mother, Lillian Alcorn Rowley and Don’s mother, Lorraine Bolton Smith Everhard (Coral Lorraine Bolton), and since I wanted to name her Laurie Ann anyway, we called her Lori.

This Day In Our Family History

1726

Dorothy Sperry died in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States

1788

James Bishop died

1872

Moses Sperry died

1921

Ila Johnson was born in Lake View, Utah, Utah, United States to William Jennings Bryant Johnson and Henriett Grace

1933

Ralph Alcorn Rowley was born, in the covenant, in Harlem, Blaine, Montana, United States to David William Rowley and Lillian Alcorn, both 29 years old. He was the 4th of 9 children, and the 3rd of 6 sons, born to the couple

Darlene Lunt Holman was born in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States to George Thornton Holman and Eva Ruth Lunt. She was the 1st of 2 children, and the 1st of 2 daughters born to the couple

1943

Moses Blakesley and Sarah Benton were sealed for time and eternity

Journal: Grace Harriet Rowley

Ralph (Ralph Alcorn Rowley) was always very smart and did well in school and was quite a scriptorium with a very good memory. He could read something and remember it.

Clayton (Clayton Alcorn Rowley) had curly red hair like Ralph did. Clayton was often into mischief. When he was about 6 he was walking barefoot down by the river and some bridge workers asked were his shoes were. He said he didn’t have any so they took him to town and bought him shoes, socks, pants, and shirts. He was very dependable and would do what he was asked to do.

When Margie (Marjorie Ann Rowley) was a little girl she liked to throw temper tantrums until she would turn blue. Mother (LIllian Alcorn) would tell us to throw water on her face and she would be fine. When I got a little older and mother and father (Davis Alcorn Rowley) were gone. Sometimes Margie and I would make fudge and take it to our bedroom to eat. Sometimes we would share it with the boys and sometimes we wouldn’t.

When Hugh (Hugh Alcorn Rowley) was born, he also had red curly hair like Clayton and Ralph. Hugh was always fun to have around.

When Sharon (Sharon Lee Rowley) was born I was supposed to help the boys thin the beets and work the farm, but I kept passing out. So Mother traded places with me and worked the farm and I stayed in the house, did the cleaning and took care of baby Sharon. She was such a sweet baby. We were not blessed with her in our home for very long. Sharon had asthma when she was born. She passed away when she was 4 months old. Dad brought her back through the priesthood power one time. She stayed with us for a few days longer and then she died. Again Dad wanted to bring her back, but Mother said no, her mission here was complete and she was out of pain. I was very close to baby Sharon and this was another difficult time in my young life.

When my youngest brother Grant (Grant Alcorn Rowley) was born he also had asthma and the doctor told Mother and Father that they would need to move to a warmer, drier climate than Montana had. Mom’s bother, Leonard (Leonard Clark Alcorn) lived in El Monte, California and had a job waiting for Dad. So the family moved to California. When Grant was about three. Don (Donald Eugene Smith) and I bought him a little sailor suit and someone told him it was too small for him to wear anymore, he cried because he still wanted to wear it.

Dad bought us a home in El Monte, California that a blind man built.  Our neighbors had a daughter my age, Patty Smith (Ollie Lavern Smith), we became good friends. I dated her stepbrother Jack (Gerald Everhard) for a while until her older brother Don came home from the Navy. The day I met him he said, “If it wasn’t so late, we would go to Las Vegas and get married.” I thought he was joking. But we did get married a few months later on August 4th 1945. (We were sealed in the Salt Lake Temple in February, 1956). John (John Joseph Everhard) who was Don’s stepfather later told me that I had made the right choice in marrying Don instead of Jack.

Journal: Grace Harriet Rowley

Being the oldest of nine children gave me a lot of responsibility. I would stay home from school about once a week to help Mother (Lillian Alcorn) with the laundry. Laundry was a big task for our large family.

 I have many fond memories of my younger brothers and sister. David (David Alcorn Rowley) and I started school together and on the first day David crawled under the desk and went to sleep. Then when school was over he went up to the teacher and told her that she would have to finish his work because it was time for him to go home. David wasn’t very tall and we had fun dancing together. We were very close. It was really hard when he was killed in the Korean War in 1950. At the time,   I was living in Virginia with Don (Donald Eugene Smith) and Cheryl (Cheryl Jeanette Smith) and expecting Donna (Donna Diane Smith).

My brother Doug (Douglas Alcorn Rowley) would sometimes tell me that he wished there had only been two kids in the family, he and I. We were close in age and to each other. He was always a good kid, but on the occasion he was spanked, he would not cry. Dad (David William Rowley) always felt that you got spanked until you cried. Doug had long curly ringlets when he was born and was always good-natured. One time when Doug was about seven we went to town to see the Carnival with Uncle Francis (Hugh Francis Rowley) in his truck. When we left the carnival Mother asked Dad if Doug was in the truck and he said yes. They had not seen Doug get back out of the truck. We had been home about an hour when Doug walked in and told us he had been left in town and walked 4 miles home. Mother and Dad were always more careful after that.

One time Dad told me to have the boys (Doug and Ralph Alcorn Rowley) bring the cows in from the field at 5 pm. So that he could milk them when he got home from town. I couldn’t get the boys to do it. So I threw a shoe at Ralph, he ducked and the shoe went through Dad’s glass bookcase. I was worried. When Dad got home he didn’t say anything to me about throwing my shoe, but the boys got spanked for not obeying me. That was hard on me because I felt guilty.

When my brother Hugh (Hugh Alcorn Rowley) was born and he let out his first cry. Doug said that someone had just stepped on the cat’s tale.

When Ralph was about 6 years we had the mumps in our house. Ralph was determined that he was not going to get the mumps. He would not touch anything that anyone else had used. Unfortunately it did not help him. When he came down with the mumps, he got them on both sides and was very sick.