How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Great-Grandfather: Charles Edward Bolton – 83
Charles Edward 83 – Coral Lorraine 28 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Grandmother: Olive Dove Doke – 84
Olive Dove 84 – Coral Lorraine 28 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Grandmother: Coral Lorraine Bolton – 28
Coral Lorraine 28 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

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How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Great-Grandfather: Benjamin Hezekiah Smith – 77
Benjamin Hezekiah 77 – Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Grandmother: Mattie Ann Elizabeth Atchinson – 78
Mattie Ann Elizabeth 78 – Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Grandfather: Joe Ben Smith – 27
Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Aunt: Emma Lucille Smith – 79
Emma Lucille 79 + Benjamin Hezekiah 77 – Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Deriot Eugene Smith – 80
Deriot Eugene 80 + Benjamin Hezekiah 77 – Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Aunt: Morrice Tommy Smith – 81
Morrice Tommy 81 + Benjamin Hezekiah 77 – Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Great-Uncle: Charles Ivan Smith – 82
Charles Ivan 82 + Benjamin Hezekiah 77 – Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Great-Grandfather: Joe Ben Smith – 27
Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Grandmother: Coral Lorraine Bolton – 28
Coral Lorraine 28 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Grandfather: Donald Eugene Smith – 9
Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Great-Aunt: Ollie Lavern Smith – 29
Ollie Lavern 29 + Joe Ben 27 – Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

How Are You Related To Me?

Maternal Grandfather: Donald Eugene Smith – 9
Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Grandmother: Grace Harriet Rowley – 10
Grace Harriet 10 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Uncle: Donald Eugene Smith, Jr. – 11
Donald Eugene Jr 11 + Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Aunt: Cheryl Jeanette Smith – 12
Cheryl Jeanette 12 + Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Aunt: Donna Diane Smith – 13
Donna Diane 13 + Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Maternal Uncle: Ronald Steven Smith – 14
Ronald Steven 14 + Donald Eugene 9 – Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

Mother: Lillian Lorraine Smith – 3
Lillian Lorraine 3 – Kellie Jeanette 1

+: Parent
-: Child
=: Spouse

History: David William Rowley

The Pasadena Stake called me on a short term Stake Mission after I had already put my place up for sale, I did work at it for a while, though. It was also about this time that we got word that my Grandfather, Davis Peter Davis, had died in Idaho Falls. I wasn’t able to go up to the funeral and I felt bad about that.

We had written to Lillian’s (Lillian Alcorn) Aunt Jeannette (Margaret Jeanette Alcorn) who lived on the outskirts of Gridley, California and she wanted us to move right up there, so we decided to move to Gridley, California. One reason for moving in the first place was that I was temporarily out of work. The Fadel Construction man came for me to go back to work, but I was already loaded up to move.

Aunt Jeannette and her family surely made us welcome. We were living right there with her for several weeks before we finally found a place we could buy. We finally bought the Melissa E. Clement place which was about three miles west of town, through the help of W. J. Shephard, a Gridley real estate man. We made the purchase on September 1, 1948.

Right at first the boys (David Alcorn, Douglas Alcorn, Ralph Alcorn, Clayton Alcorn Rowley) and I and even Marjorie (Marjorie Ann Rowley) and Hugh (Hugh Alcorn Rowley) picked fruit together, but we didn’t do so well. I think one good fruit picker could have picked more than the bunch of us put together. We really tried awful hard to pick fast and well, it just didn’t work out so well. We picked for a month or so and then the picking was over for the year. Hugh fell out of a tree and broke his arm which added to our disillusionment about being fruit pickers!

Then I got a job up in Oroville Canyon with the Morrison Knudson Construction Company. We were building the Cresta Dam and I worked for them all winter until the following summer. Then I got a job with The Fife and Stoddard Construction Company and worked for them all the time we lived in Gridley. In Gridley we had a good garden, some fruit trees and some chickens and it seemed more like home.

On Thanksgiving day 1948, Marjorie complained of a sore throat. It turned out to be diphtheria. The family was quarantined and I boarded with the neighbors so I could keep working. It didn’t go through the family, but the quarantine lasted three months. Before it was over Marjorie and Hugh had to have their tonsils out. It was quite an experience for our family. I remember looking in the doorway at Christmas and watching the children enjoying their toys. It was really hard not to be able to come in and enjoy them with my family.

David had been discharged from the Navy and had come home and started back to school. He and Douglas and Ralph boarded with neighbors on the other side of us during the time the family was in quarantine.

On the 7th of June 1949, Grace (Grace Harriet Rowley) had a baby girl. They named her Cheryl (Cheryl Jeanette Smither), we now had a grandchild! Just after this Don (Donald Eugene Smith) enlisted in the Army. Since Don seemed to like it David decided to enlist in the Army, too. They were in the same outfit for quite a while.

To be continued on May 24th

History: David William Rowley

As far as Church callings went in El Monte, I was teaching the Sunday School class that Douglas (Douglas Alcorn Rowley) and Ralph (Ralph Alcorn Rowley) were in, I was on the genealogical committee as well as working with the welfare program and I was in the Elder’s Quorum presidency.

I got a job with the U.S. Rubber Company where Leonard (Leonard Clark Alcorn) worked. When summer came I took on other jobs also to help with the expenses of a large family.

(For details of the children’s experiences in school, see Lillian’s (Lillian Alcorn) history).

David (David Alcorn Rowley) had been having his troubles since leaving the farm and I wasn’t able to give him hardly any money. He couldn’t pick up any work that easily either. He and Don (Donald Eugene Smith) were good pals, so he joined the Navy while we were living here, but he didn’t like that very well. He later joined the Army.

We had a lot of good friends in the El Monte ward and Lillian and I would go to parties with them. We had lots of good times. One time they gave me a surprise birthday party. I was also asked to be Santa Clause that Christmas, (for details about these events, see Lillian’s history).

It was here that Douglas had his eyes operated on and the muscles changed back behind them. His eyes would cross while he was looking at you. They had tried to correct this condition in Montana with glasses, but it didn’t work very well. He didn’t have to wear glasses after the operation. The story of Douglas selling his glasses in school in Montana is told in Lillian’s history also.

In August of 1946 Grace (Grace Harriet Rowley) had a baby boy. They named him Donald Eugene (Donald Eugene Smith Jr), after his father. We were all saddened when he lived only about 17 hours. It was really hard on Grace and Don.

I went to work for the Fidel Construction Company and worked up in the San Gabriel Canyon. I worked both jobs for a while, then quit the Rubber Company.

It was while I was working on this new job that we got word that my father, Hugh Thompson Rowley, had died on 14 March 1948, I got leave from my job and I went back to Montana for the funeral, dad hadn’t been himself since he had sleeping sickness some years before. He would get disoriented even out in our backyard, and Francis (Hugh Francis Rowley) or Erma (Erma Thornton) or the children would have to lead him back into the house. It was a time of reunion, although a sad one. My Uncle Royal was there and we had a nice visit, Francis asked me if there was anything I wanted and I told him I would like Dad’s old watch since he bought it the year I was born.

I sold my place in Montana for a lot less than I should have had out of it, but with the money I was able to pay off the place in El Monte, California.

I was asked to help build the new chapel in El Monte. I worked on it for a while but didn’t get to help finish it because Lillian and I had decided to move to a smaller community thinking it would be better for the children. We had all lived on a farm most of our lives and there was so much congestion and crime in the city.

To be continued…

History: David William Rowley

When Grant (Grant Alcorn Rowley) was just 4 months old the doctor told us that he also had asthma and allergies and if we wanted to keep him we had better get him where it was hot and dry. We talked it over and thought of going to Mesa, Arizona, but Lillian’s (Lillian Alcorn) brother, Leonard (Leonard Clark Alcorn), wrote and said it was hot and dry where they lived in California and that he would rent a house for us and have a job waiting for me. We had our auction and sold the things we couldn’t take, rented our farm and prepared to leave for California.

We left Harlem in January of 1945. We visited friends and relatives on the way through Montana, Idaho, and Utah. When we arrived in El Monte, California we couldn’t rent the house for reasons beyond Leonard’s control and it didn’t seem as though there was any place to rent or buy with the small down payment we had.

After about two weeks we found a small house that an old couple had built. The husband was blind, so it wasn’t very well constructed, to say the least, but it was the only thing we could buy. We agreed to let the old couple live in one of the rooms for a month. Well, it turned out that they made all kinds of trouble for us, much as telling me that the children (Grace Harriet, David Alcorn, Douglas Alcorn, Ralph Alcorn, Clayton Alcorn, Marjorie Ann, Hugh Alcorn and Grant Rowley had tampered with their mail and other various things. They were hoping we would turn the house back to them and they wouldn’t have to move. He had come to me and said that I would never be able to make the payments on the place with the big family had to support, so I might as well turn the house back to him. I said to him, “Mister, you’ve got the wrong guy this time. I never promise to buy something I can’t pay for and you can be sure I’ll never let the place go back to you!” Finally, long after the month was up, I got rid of the trouble makers by moving them myself. They had said they couldn’t move into another little place because they had no way to do so.

Grant was still having his troubles. We took him to a doctor and to a lab for allergy tests. They found he was allergic to almost everything we were eating, including wheat, beef, and potatoes. The doctor also told us to give him all the oranges we could get him to eat. He ate a lot of them and they seemed to really help him. We had left Montana in the middle of the winter, January and I guess my blood was thickened up because it seemed so warm in California that I went around in my shirt sleeves all the time, even when it was still winter. The older residents of the area told me I wouldn’t do that next winter and I didn’t. I wore a coat.

Grace had grown into a lovely young lady, although she was still very young. It wasn’t very long before she and the young man next door, Donald Eugene Smith, became very interested in each other. Along in June they came to Lillian and me and told us they wanted to get married. They were both so young we didn’t feel like they were ready for marriage, I told them they should think it over very carefully and to watch each other and ask themselves, “could I stand to see him or her across the breakfast table for the rest of my life?” They waited a little while, but in July they came to us again and we agreed. The wedding date was set for 4 August 1945. The Bishop of the ward, Fred S. Hatch, performed the marriage in his own home and Don’s parents gave them a reception in their home. The kids then moved to San Pedro where Don was stationed with the Navy.

To be continued…