History: Lillian Alcorn

The children got back into school and were adjusting quite well, however it did seem rather hot for February. The elementary school was about three blocks away and the high school was about four blocks in the opposite direction. Both were good schools.

Grant seemed to still have his bad spells of breathing difficulty. It seemed to be worse when he ate certain foods. Then one day we left him with Leonard’s girls to tend for a few hours and they fed him a lot of cookies and other things. That night he had a terrible spell and we were up most of the night. We thought sure we would lose him this time. So the next morning we called a Dr. Hamilton in Pasadena. He was supposed to be one of the best baby specialists in the area. When Dave  called for an appointment he was told that the doctor was filled up for three months. Dave told them that that wouldn’t do us any good as our baby wouldn’t live that long. The doctor then told us to bring him over at closing time and he would take care of him. The doctor didn’t think he could possibly have asthma, but after examining Grant he decided that he really did have asthma and a serious case, too. He made an appointment for us to take Grant to Helen James, who was to give him a number of tests for allergy. We kept the appointment and she pricked the skin on Grant’s little back with some kind of needle and then put a drop of liquid on the spot. She did this in about 200 places. It was surely hard to stand back and watch him being hurt and crying so hard. We took him back the next day for the results and we found that he was allergic to wheat, potatoes and beef. We then took him back to Dr. Hamilton and he gave us a prescription to help him whenever he began to get stuffed up. We also discovered that oranges would help him over his spells, so we would give him all he would eat.

We hadn’t been in El Monte very long when Grace became quite interested in the boy next door. His name was Donald Eugene Smith, and he was in the Navy. They became very good friends and then one day in June they came to see us and talk to us about getting married. They were both so young that we didn’t feel they were ready for marriage or prepared to face the problems of married life yet. We told them that they should think it over very carefully first and study each other to see if they could get along. After all, they were the ones who would have to live with each other. They did decide to wait a while before making any final decisions, but they didn’t wait very long. They approached us again in July and still felt that they wanted to get married, so we agreed to let them become man and wife. Arrangements were made for a 4 August 1945 wedding. The bishop of the ward, Fred S. Batch performed the ceremony in his own home and then the young couple was honored at a reception in the home of Don’s parents (Joe Ben Smith and Coral Lorraine Bolton)*. They then moved to San Pedro where Don was stationed with the Navy.

*Joe was married to Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder and Coral was married to John Joseph Everhard at the time, not sure which home the reception

It was surely hard to see Grace go out on her own as she had been so much help to me in the home and with the younger children. She was a very good little housekeeper. I now began to realize just how much help Grace had been all through the years. She was so faithful and responsible.

Both Dave and I worked in the ward and had several different positions. I soon began to realize that we had to spend more time with the family to teach them the things they should know and I tried to do this. But I still worked in the Relief Society and the MIA. Dave taught the Sunday School class that Douglas and Ralph were in. He also was a Genealogical Committeeman as well as working with the Welfare program and Elder’s Quorum Presidency. So you see we were kept pretty busy.

Dave had found work with the U.S Rubber Co. for the first six months we were in El Monte as a bagger of tires. When summer came he began to take on other jobs to help with the expenses of a large family. We had been used to raising much of our food and now we were in the position of having to buy most of it.

It was hard to keep the children occupied too. They were used to farm life and having the run of the farm. But in the city there was so much mischief to get into when they weren’t in school. They did find enjoyment in going to the school grounds and playing ball which helped fill much of their time and was surely a big help to us in their management.

In June, Dave quit U.S. Rubber and went to doing carpenter work around the neighborhood. Then he went down and joined the Carpenter’s Union and they sent him out on jobs and he kept pretty busy and made $1.35 an hour which was pretty good in 1945.

One day the school called me and told me that Douglas was having a lot of difficulty seeing well enough to read. They recommended that we have a special eye operation, which at the time we didn’t have money for. Soon after, the President of the El Mote Lion’s Club came to see us. They wanted to sponsor the money for the operation from a special fund they had for things of this kind. We were told we could pay them back as we were able, so we agreed and an appointment was made for us at the Eye Clinic down in Los Angeles. Dave had to work, so I took Douglas down to the clinic for the surgery. They said the muscles in the back of his eyes needed adjusting. They had to remove his eye and adjust the muscles and then put it back in place. After that it was necessary to take eye exercises for months to get the muscles adjusted to working together. We had had some warning that there was something wrong with Doug’s eyes while we were living in Montana. We had purchased glasses for him there. One day Douglas came home from school in Harlem without his glasses, which had cost about $20.00. When we questioned him about them, he told us he had sold them to a playmate for a nickel. We had quite a time getting them back as the boy’s father said that a deal is a deal. But finally he consented to let us buy them back.

We had a wonderful group of friends in El Monte and we used to do quite a few things together. We would go to parties, movies and enjoyed being together. We were all members of the Church and attended Church functions as a group, too. There had been several surprise birthday parties given within the group and Dave said one time that it would take a lot of doing to surprise him. So the gang decided to put it to the test and they planned a surprise birthday party for him. We were going to have a get together on Dave’s birthday anyway and go to the Deardens’ home to make donuts and play games. What Dave didn’t know was that they were coming to our place first to surprise him. They all parked their cars around the corner and came quietly into the house. One of the ladies came in first and asked where Dave was and I told her he was in the bedroom, but to be careful that he might be dressing. Well she didn’t hear the last part of my sentence and the whole group, led by several ladies barged into the bedroom with a big “SURPRISE.” I believe they were as surprised as Dave was because he was just putting on his trousers and they were all very embarrassed. We had many good laughs about it later.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

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History: Lillian Alcorn

It is at times like these that we truly appreciate our friends and loved ones. The comfort they can give to us is good for the soul. We usually take these loved ones and friends for granted and sort of expect them to do certain things, but when we have tragedy come to us they seem to go the extra mile to help us adjust to the problems, and they don’t seem quite as bad as they might otherwise.

It was surely lonely after Sharon was taken away. It seemed to leave a vacancy in our lives that nothing would ever fill. But it seems that time heals all wounds and that many other blessings come and soon such terrible heartaches drift into the background of life and the present becomes more real than the past.

As time went on we decided that we needed an outside entrance into our basement, so Dave proceeded to fix one. At this same time he was able to purchase a used coal furnace for $15 that had been taken out of another house to be replaced with a gas furnace. It was a good furnace and we appreciated it very much. We installed it in the basement with a big register cut into the floor of the living room upstairs. It was so good in the winter as we wouldn’t have to touch it all day long after it had been stoked and banked in the morning. It kept the house warm all day and way into the night. We would take care of it night and morning.

While we were working in the basement, Dave also fixed a large fruit room and a large coal storage bin as well as sleeping facilities for the boys. We set up a washing area in the basement for me, too. So we were quite comfortable in our home. Things take time, but we were accomplishing our goals little by little.

I had been told by doctors that it would be unwise for me to have another baby but my arms ached for a tiny one to fill them, since the loss of Sharon. So against the advice of the doctors, I found myself once again with child. I didn’t have a hard time carrying the baby until the last while. Two weeks before I was to have the baby the doctor put me in the hospital in Havre. I had toxemia and high blood pressure.

On the way to the hospital I had a very strange experience. Of course with my five boys and two girls I was hoping for another girl. In fact all the family were crossing their fingers for a girl, that is except for Clayton. He wanted another brother. Well, as we were driving to Havre, I was saying a silent prayer that My Heavenly Father would grant our desires. As I was praying to myself, a voice said to me as plain as anything could be, “you will have another beautiful boy.” It was such a real thing that I no longer desired a little girl and put my mind at rest knowing I was going to bear a son.

On 26 June 1944 the baby was born and it was a beautiful healthy boy. We named him Grant Alcorn Rowley. I remember that when we called a neighbor on the phone to let the family know, Clayton kept saying, “I told you it would be another boy.” But all the family was thankful it was over and that we had a sweet baby to fill the vacancy left by our lovely Sharon.

Grant was only about four months old when the doctor told us that he also had an allergy and asthma and that if we wanted to save him, we would have to move to a warm, dry climate. So we tentatively decided to rent our farm and sell our stock and equipment and move to Mesa, Arizona.

We had an auction sale for our farm equipment and stock on 16 December 1944 and then prepared to leave when we received a letter from my brother Leonard Alcorn. He lived in El Monte, California. He said that it was hot and dry down there and if we would come there, he would rent us a house and have a job waiting for Dave. So we decided to go to El Monte, California and we rented the farm to Harold Morris and left Harlem in January of 1945.

My Dad had his big truck, so he consented to help us move our belongings. We put our furniture and all our earthly possessions into his big van and Dave fixed a little camper-style back onto a pickup for the boys to ride in and off we went. We stopped along the way to visit relatives and so it took us several days to make the trip. Dave found some big rocks that we would heat and put into the camper to help keep the boys warm until we got out of the cold country.

The first night we stopped at Dillon, Montana where we rented a couple of rooms in a motel. But poor little Grant got asthma so bad, that we thought we were going to lose him there. We were up with him most all night. We left there very early the next morning. It was 20° below zero that morning as we left Dillon. It gradually got warmer the farther south we came.

The next day we went from the cold north to the town where Dave was born, Shelley, Idaho. His Aunt Annie Robinson lived there, and she was gracious and hospitable and prepared beds for us with her that night. We also visited with Dave’s uncle Royal James Rowley where our little son, Hugh, kept us all in stitches with his entertaining stories and jokes.

Our next stop was Brigham City, Utah where we stopped with my Uncle Albert and Aunt Dollie Weaver and enjoyed a visit with some of the Weavers who lived in the area. We spent the night there in Brigham City and then drove on the next day until we arrived in Utah’s Dixieland in Cedar City. We spent the night there with Dave’s Mothers sister, Aunt Hannah Foster. We enjoyed ourselves a lot in such a reunion. I had never met them, and Dave hadn’t seen them since he was about seven years old, so we talked until late hours and really enjoyed ourselves.

We arrived on Garvey Blvd. in El Monte, California about three o’clock in the afternoon on a February day in 1945. We called Leonard right away and he told us that the people who had been living in the house we were supposed to rent had scarlet fever and couldn’t move out. But he had made arrangements for us to move in with some friends until we could rent or buy a house. This proved to be quite a problem. There just didn’t seem to be any homes for rent in the area at all. There were quite a few places for sale, but they required larger down payments than we could give. We would look early in the morning and late in the evening trying to find something. It took us about two weeks before we found one we could even buy with our small down payment.

We did finally find a house that an older couple had built. It wasn’t very well constructed, but it was within our financial reach, so we decided to make the purchase. We signed the contract and made preparations to move in. We had agreed to let the older couple live in one of the rooms of the house for a month. The house was located at 237 S. Meeker Rd. between Garvey and Valley Blvd’s. The house had cement floors and our poor little Grant seemed to get a lot of hard knocks. Every time I turned around he seemed to be falling off something or other; the couch, his high chair or something. The floors were all so uneven and the walls were of insulations board. The ward there met in the Carpenter’s Union Hall about a mile or two away and the family was certainly glad to get going to Church again. The ward was quite different from the small branch we had known in Montana all our lives.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

My only sister Melva was married in 1940 to Robert L. Goe. They were living in Salt Lake City, Utah. In May 1941, I took Marjorie and went to Utah to be with Melva when her first baby was to be born. My brother Leonard drove us in his car to Salt Lake City. Melva’s baby was born 30 May 1941 and was a lovely little girl which they named Karen. Marjorie and I returned after three weeks, on the bus. While we were gone, Grace, who was only 12 years old, took complete charge of the house and prepared the meals for all those boys. She even bottled several quarts of seedless grapes, which by the way, stayed good for years.

About this time the Branch decided to build a new chapel. A plot of ground was selected in town and the work began. It was completed and we moved into a lovely new white chapel. It was good to have more room for classes and a Relief Society room with kitchen facilities. It was good indeed and we certainly appreciated the new building.

We had an old log ice-house on our place and we would get big blocks of ice from the river every winter and fill the ice-house. It would last long into the summer months.

I gave birth to another baby on 14 May 1942. It was a lovely red-haired little girl. She was the first baby I had that was born in a hospital. We named her Sharon Lee Rowley. She was very quiet, sweet and loveable baby and was a real joy to us. This precious baby was not to be ours for very long, at least in mortality. She was a frail baby and we soon learned that she had asthma.

One Sunday morning, 27 September 1942 while Dave and the boys were doing chores, Sharon had a bad choking spell. She couldn’t seem to breath nor stop coughing and choking. I sent Grace after Dave and he sent one of the boys across the ditch for Francis. Dave and Francis got to the house about the same time. By this time, Sharon had from all appearances stopped breathing. Dave took her and I got the consecrated oil and he and Francis administered to her. She still seemed lifeless and Dave began to work her left arm up and down similar to working a pump handle. Within a minute or so she started breathing again and we rejoiced and thanked our Father in Heaven for his blessings to us and for the power of the priesthood which was in our home.

The next day we took Sharon to the hospital in Havre, about 40 miles from Harlem. I was allowed to stay right there with her. Although Sharon had always been a quiet baby and hadn’t smiled much in her short life, she seemed to smile and be quite content there in the hospital. Then on Wednesday, 30 September 1942 in the late afternoon, Dave and I were standing by her crib and she talked, cooed and smiled and seemed to be trying to tell us that this is the way things were supposed to be. She died about 5:00 p.m. that evening. It was a great loss to me and the family. A close friend at the time gave us the following poem in which we found much comfort.

-A PRAYER-

O Father, help me to understand and know the reason why,
The Child that Thou dids’t give to me so early had to die.
Why one who’s life had been so pure, who never knew deceit
Should droop and wither like a flower crushed under ruthless feet.

O Father, help me to understand Thy purpose divine,
In letting death, with ruthless hand, tear her dear heart from mine.
O, let me see the veil beyond where dwells her spirit pure,
And l know she is happy where she had gone, O let me feel secure.

Forgive the surging doubts that rise within my aching heart,
And take the dimness from mine eyes, let darkness all depart.
Let light and knowledge come to me from Heaven, Thy home on high.
O, help me put my trust in Thee, O Father, tell me why!

Perhaps I sin in asking this, more faith should show in thee,
But, Oh I miss her loving kiss, she was so dear to me.
Just let me know that I sometime shall find her once again,
And clasp again her form to me, I as in Jesus’ name, Amen!

-AN ANSWER-

Grieve not, my daughter, for time shall be when death shall be no more,
Thy loved one I’ll return to thee to cherish evermore.
“Twas in the plan that man should die and slumber in the grave,
But rise again as even I, for this my life I gave.

For mortal life is but a part of God’s eternity.
In which the souls of men embark to find felicity.
What men call death is but a step from low to higher plane.
And all who in the dust have slept, though me, shall live again.

Then grieve not for the one that’s gone, let your heart despair,
For God in wisdom called your child to work for Him up there.
The prison gates to open wide for those who died in sin,
And through repentance them to guide, again to worship him.

Let this, then be your answer why, and let your heart rejoice,
for until God they do not die who to His voice.
But walk with Him is realms of love where all the righteous be,
be comforted, for there above, Thy child shall welcome thee!

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

Well, along in March, Mr. Eppler sent us a statement that we were $2.50 overdrawn and he wanted Dave to come in and pay it up. However, according to the account Dave kept, he still owed us over $18.00. So Dave jumped on a saddle horse and went in to see him. Dave took the receipts and they figured out the same as ours. Dave told him so and he said that we had made a mistake or didn’t have all the tickets and that he wanted us to pay the $2.50. Dave told him that he still owed us some $18.00 and Mr. Eppler got pretty mean about it, so Dave threatened to take it down to the courthouse and let the court figure it. Mr. Eppler pretty quickly changed his tone and offered to do anything, but he didn’t want the matter brought before the court and made public.

Well after losing all we had in the Lee Morgan episode we moved back to the farm with Dave’s folks on the old Jake Everett place. Francis and my brother Leonard rented the Thomas Everett place below Harlem.

In the spring of 1933, on 14 April, we had another arrival. A little red-headed boy we named Ralph Alcorn Rowley. He was very cute, but he cried quite a bit. He found out early in life that he could get much of what he wanted by crying for it and it became a habit that later was hard to break. He always seemed to like to lead and had a great determination to do what he thought was right. Ralph was born in a little house on Dad Rowley’s place and Dr. Hoone was our Doctor again. He came out to the house and took care of us. A little to the east of the house and across the fence was the Branch Chapel. While back from the road a ways was Dad Rowley’s house, buildings and yards.

On the west ran the sleepy Milk River. Sleepy, that is except when the ice broke up in the spring and we had many ice jams and much high water from heavy rains and melting snow in the spring. It was during one of these high waters and floods that all of the music I had collected over the years was destroyed, which upset me very much because some of it could not be replaced.

The soil here was very sandy and wonderful garden soil and again we raised a wonderful garden. It seemed so hard to get back on our feet again financially that it was really discouraging at times. I was very blue part of the time, but I had only to look at my growing children to spark a smile. Douglas and Ralph were fast becoming bosom pals and David was the “big brother” and was a big help in keeping them happy and content. The children certainly help to brighten my outlook many times.

Dave trapped in the winters and took care of stock and continued farming in the summer. Then in the spring of 1934 Dave started to work for A.L. Johnson on his farm. Mr. Johnson was working for the government on the Indian Reservation and Dave and the Johnson boys took care of the farm. They irrigated, put in crops, harvested and took care of a herd of sheep, a herd of cattle and other stock.

On 6 October 1934 another blessed event took place. A little red-headed boy was born. He was named and blessed Clayton Alcorn Rowley. He wasn’t as healthy and robust as the others had been and for a long while we thought we were going to lose him. Once while Dave was in town, Clayton became quite ill. I had no way to contact Dave to have him bring something home from town for the baby and I was nearly frantic with worry. When Dave arrived home he had some milk of magnesia with him. He had felt that something was wrong at home and felt impressed to get some milk of Magnesia so he did. We gave some to Clayton and it was just what he needed. It settled his stomach and he quieted down and slept. Another time he became quite ill and we sent for the Doctor, but Dave and Brother Elmer Hulse administered to him and when the doctor came he said there was nothing wrong with him and he was well from that day on. But before the blessing we thought that almost every breath would be his last. It was through the wonderful power of the Priesthood that this precious little red-head was spared. He was our fifth child, all of which we are very grateful for.

That winter was a very hard winter and Dave rode horse back to and from work all winter long. Of course, I stayed home and took care of our four boys and one girl. In the early spring of 1935, Mr. Johnson fixed us up a small house there on the place and we moved over there. We were handy to the work and were better able to help with the chores. We worked for the Johnson’s for two years and our only trouble was with Bruce who was nothing but a small kid, but he thought he should run the whole deal. He was also full of mischief.

While on the Johnson place, David and Clair, one of the Johnson boys, were playing in back of the house. There was a lovely wooded area back there ideal for boyhood play. I looked out the window one day and the woods were on fire. David and Clair had set fire to the woods. We were fortunate to put it out and no one was hurt. It had certainly given me a scare though.

The winter we were there was one of the coldest winters we ever saw. The temperature would go down to about 56˚ below zero at night and then back up to 40˚ below zero during the day. The frost gathered on the walls in our bedroom, mostly behind the bed, until it was about half an inch thick. We had only one stove in the house and that was in the kitchen. It was a large Majestic range and then we only had one other room which was the small bedroom.

Dave made a figure four trap and during the worst part of the winter he trapped Chinese pheasants which we ate and canned. They surely tasted good. The snow was deep and they would come up to feed off the feeds lots when Dave would leave after putting the grain out for the sheep and cattle.

There were none of the children going to school the first year at the Johnson’s and I had to keep them in the house through those real cold spells. The telephone and electric wires would get so thick and heavy with frost that they looked like they were several inches thick and our windows had ice frozen clear to the top of them. There was sort of a swale behind the house in which grew some brush and small trees. They would get very heavy-laden with frost and it was one of the most beautiful sights one could imagine. Such beauty as you sometimes see in the early stages of cold weather on the window panes only it had a much deeper background.

We weren’t bothered too much with the cold unless the wind blew. When the wind would blow the cold was much more penetrating, but then we had both coal and wood to burn and a good stove to keep us warm. Most every morning during the really cold spells, Dave had to go out and cut the sheep loose from the ground. There would always be some of them frozen down. That is or their wool would freeze to the ground and they couldn’t get up off the ground until they were cut loose.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

The dressings on Mother’s cancer had to be changed every little while as it was constantly draining. She was in so much pain all the time that her ordinary pleasant disposition was sometimes very difficult to satisfy and I tried hard to do whatever she wanted or to get whatever she needed. Father and the older boys had to be away most of the time making a living. Thinning, weeding and topping beets and most any other kind of work they could do to keep the family together and all healthy. In spite of our efforts after Mother died, Verl was adopted out to the Bishop Perry family and I went into the fields and worked with the rest of the family. So besides caring for the needs of the younger children, Dad and the housework, I was thinning, hoeing and weeding and topping beets with the rest of them.

There was time, now and then, for me to spend with my friends and to enjoy the out of doors. I loved the hills around where we lived and I loved to hike and tramp around these hills. We used to go over to where Indians had lived long ago and inspect the writings that we found on the cliffs there. I have often showed my children and grandchildren these same cliffs and hills and caves that I enjoyed so much as a young girl and lady. They seemed to enjoy exploring them as much as I did. I also enjoyed horseback riding.

In 1924 Dad and I went on a trip to California. The change was good for us and we enjoyed it very much. As we went over the California border we had a sack of oranges with us and they wouldn’t allow us to take them into the state, so we peeled them all and sat there in the car and ate every one of them. I didn’t think I could eat another orange as long as I lived. But I still enjoy them.

In the spring of 1925 after thinning beets until the season was over we decided to go to Harlem, Montana and work for the season and then come back to Utah. But instead of coming back to Utah we rented the Amos Everett Ranch about six and a half miles east of Harlem, Blaine Co., Montana. We farmed 160 acres of ground and as usual I did my share of work in the fields. We thinned, topped and worked in the beets. We also had about 1500 chickens which were my responsibility. The boys did the chore of keeping the coops clean and most of the manual work pertaining to their care and I took care of the rest. Sometimes my work in the house made it impossible for me to do much with the chickens. At these times the boys would fill in and take care of them for me. I appreciated this help very much.

Dad was a good provider and he tried hard to be one with us in going out to dances and socials and etc. He was anxious to see that we all had good times. I was very much afraid of my father and tried awfully hard to do whatever he wanted.

It was while we lived on the Amos Everett ranch that we all went to Church in the LDS Chapel which was 3 ½ miles west of Harlem. We had a nice old chapel, one large room divided into classrooms by curtains. Albert L. Johnson was Branch President with Angus Young and Chris Stuker as counselors and A. Lorenzo Stoddard as Branch Clerk. They asked me to work as a Counselor in the YWMIA with Martha Southwick as President and Alma Turner as 1st Counsellor. Mary Stoddard was the secretary/treasurer.

We had many enjoyable meetings in this little old chapel. It used to be a recreation hall out in the hills northeast of Harlem which our Branch bought. They cut it in two and moved it into the valley and out on the corner of the Jake Everett farm. They put it back together and fixed it up for a meeting place which was used for about twenty years. There was an old-fashioned pot-bellied stove at one end of the building which kept it plenty warm, even on the coldest of days.

I was blessed with a fair singing voice and was called upon quite often to sing in various programs. I enjoyed this very much. Some of my favorite songs were: “The Prisoner’s Song” – “’Twas a Cold Stormy Night” – “What’s the Use of Being Good” – among others. My favorite Christmas song was “Star of the East” which I often sang. I had quite a collection of music but during one of the spring runoff floods of the Milk River I lost all of it which made me very unhappy. Some of the music was not replaceable.

While we were living on the Amos Everett place the family went to a dance in Zurich which was about twenty miles away. We went in the old Ford car. I had become pretty well acquainted with the young people of the area and when a man came up to me and asked for a dance I told him I didn’t know him and I didn’t dance with strangers. Soon a friend, Bert Murphy, came and asked me if I would like to meet a young man and he introduced me to David William Rowley from Lohman, Montana. Lo and behold, this was the same young man who had invited me to dance. He asked around until he found someone who knew me and asked him to introduce us. Well, after this proper introduction I accepted a dance with him and was very much impressed with him, however I didn’t see him again for a long time. Dave told his brother Emerson that night that he had met his future wife.

Sometime later our agricultural field agent came to see us about our farm practices and he was invited to have dinner with us. We all knew Brother Barnes, the field agent, but the man that was with him was Hugh T. Rowley and a stranger. Upon introduction and hearing the name Rowley, I asked if he knew Dave and come to find out he was Dave’s father. I also found out that Dave taught a Sunday School class in the Chinook Branch. At that time though, he was working back in the hills on Clear Creek on the Morrison & Butler farms. Just before I was to serve dinner I discovered I was out of butter and not knowing what to do I put some food coloring in some shortening and passed it off as butter and no one ever knew the difference. This was in the early spring of 1926.

The Rowley’s rented the Colgrove place that spring and moved to Harlem and started to go to the Harlem Branch to Church. I became very well acquainted with Verda, Dave’s only sister. Verda later became the wife of Bert Murphy, the friend who had introduced me to Dave. Verda and I became good friends and I enjoyed her company very much. Dave wasn’t with the family when they moved to Harlem. He was still working on the Morrison & Butler farms. The farms were located about 14 miles southwest of Chinook, Montana and Chinook was about 20 miles from Harlem. It was a large sheep and hay ranch.

Well, My Dad and the boys got the crops in that Spring, mostly beets and potatoes. The crop did very well and the chickens started to lay early and that really helped us in paying our expenses. In May, Dave came home from the Ranch and helped his folks put in their crops and then went back to put up hay for Morrison and Butler. While he was in the valley though, we went out on several dates. With Verda and I as good friends and Leonard and Francis who became good friends we had some very good times together.

I had a lot of responsibility caring for my Mother’s family and I learned to be a hard and fast worker in all I had to do. I cooked and cared for the family and our hired help. One time one of the men made a remark in town that all they had for breakfast at Alcorn’s place was a prayer and cereal. The word got back to me so the next morning all I put on the table was cereal and as usual we had our morning prayer. The hired man asked if that was all we were going to eat and I repeated to him what he had told the fellows in town a few days before, that man learned a good lesson and we all had a good laugh.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

While we were living here I started to school again in the fall of 1910 at the Thatcher School. The teacher was still Miss Watt. Horrace Miller drove the school wagon and used to really tease. I remember trying to get back at him by sticking my tongue out at him. Later on in the fall we moved on to the Miller place in the Penrose Ward and I changed schools and attended Penrose. We had one room downstairs and one room upstairs in this house.

The Christmas of 1910 I remember we got nuts and candy in our stockings. Leonard got a pocket knife and I got some material for a dress. Shortly after Christmas we moved to Perry, Box Elder, Utah, which was first known as three-mile creek. It is three miles south of Brigham City. We lived in the north room of the old Mathew’s place kitty-cornered from the LDS Chapel. Uncle Albert and Aunt Dollie Cook Weaver lived in the south room. It was while we lived there that my brother Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn was born. He was born 27 March 1911. I attended school in Perry while we lived there.

Shortly after Lorenzo was born dad took my brothers Leonard and Marvin and myself out to Thatcher and left us with Aunt Fannie Nelson. We all came down with chicken pox while we were there so mother, who was to follow us, stayed in Perry with the baby until we were all over them. Then we moved back in the Vance house and I again started school in Thatcher. It was while on this place that dad filed a homestead on 160 acres of land on the bench west of Penrose.

We always looked forward to the times when we would go into Brigham City where our Grandparents lived. Dad had a very spirited little team of horses, Dick and Bess. We had a one-seated buggy without a top but with a large umbrella fastened to the back of the seat. Mother would dress us up in our Sunday best and off we would go. Usually by the time we get to out Grandparents’ home, we were dusty and dirty and looked as if we hadn’t been cleaned up at all. Mother would hold the baby and maybe a smaller child would sit in the seat between Mother and Dad and on our feet, because Leonard and I would sit on the top of the seat with our feet on the seat.

Dad was always singing. The horses were really a snappy little team and fast trotters. Some of the songs Dad would sing were ‘Lay My Little Shoes Away,’ ‘My Old Kentucky Hills,’ ‘My Mother’s Dear Hands,’ and many others. It was about twenty-five miles into Perry and we lived west and north of there.

While we were living on the Vance place in Penrose another brother was born. Harold Archie Alcorn was born 2 Sept 1914. We were always happy when another baby arrived safely and healthy, but I was getting a little impatient to get a little sister. Well, maybe next time!

I helped Mother quite a bit around the house and enjoyed doing it. Mother was a very good housekeeper and had a place for everything which was to be put in its proper place. Mother was quite determined about this and we learned young to comply with her wishes. I remember one time, though when she broke this hard-fast rule herself. Upon looking out of the window one morning she noticed the Relief Society Visiting Teachers leaving the neighbor’s house. They were walking but Mother still didn’t have time to do the dishes, so she piled them all in the dishpan and shoved them in the oven. I was flabbergasted! Mother had never done anything like that before and as far as I can remember didn’t do it again. But that one time well, it has really stuck in my mind.

I graduated from the eighth grade in school and that was all I was allowed to go as Dad was from the old school of thought that girls didn’t need any more education than that just to run a home and family. We were quite active in the activities of the Church and as we were growing up my brother, Leonard and I went a lot of places together. During the summer months we used to walk to and from the church doings. I remember well this one particular time when several girlfriends and myself were walking home late at night, about ten o’clock. We all walked in the same direction for a ways then we parted and went towards our own homes. We were determined that we wouldn’t run, but I was the only one who had to walk past the cemetery on my way home. It was pretty spooky as we had been telling ghost stories and the like, but I just wasn’t going to run. About the time I was passing the cemetery I noticed a rustling sound behind me. I slowed down to listen and the rustling slowed down. I speeded up and the rustling speeded up. I didn’t dare look back and I was determined not to run. Well, about the time I arrived home I discovered that the “rustling” was just my heavily starched petticoat!

Mother used to buy most of my clothes and shoes for me. Once she saw some really cute shoes on sale and bought them for me. I liked them too, but they were just too small for me. Mother had gotten them on sale and she insisted that I wear them. I suffered through it. I don’t know if this is the reason, but all my life I have suffered with my feet hurting and they have always been quite wide.

I remember another time I had worked and earned some money for myself. I gave the folks some and then went to town and bought a beautiful brown satin dress. It was tiered with about three tiers. I had had my eye on it for a long time and when I took it home my Mother didn’t like it. She almost made me take it back. Then still another time I bought a hat, but this time I pleased Mother with it. Mother was hard to please and that is why she bought most of my clothes for me.

My one and only sister, Melva Alcorn was born 24 November 1918 in Penrose, Box Elder, Utah. Soon after her birth, in my sixteenth year, it was discovered that my Mother had cancer of the breast. She wasn’t too ill at first and was able to carry on most of her responsibilities. During this time, on 22 June 1920 she gave birth to her eighth and last child. Another boy who was named Jesse Verl Alcorn. He was also born in Penrose, Utah.

It soon became apparent that Mother must undergo surgery. She was operated on and had the right breast removed, but it did not stop the cancer. I have always felt that if the surgery had taken place during this time of medical knowledge they would have been able to stop the cancer, but it wasn’t. Mother suffered with cancer for three years and on 9 November 1922 she passed away. I was with her at the time and was holding her hand. I was almost 19 years old then.

This is one of the most difficult times of my entire life. I never realized the full extent of it at the time, however, we had always had Mother with us whenever we needed her even though for the last year before she died she had been an invalid and suffered far more than any of us know. I took care of her and was constantly at her side except the time needed to take care of the necessary housework and family. Dad and Mother had six boys and one girl younger than me, although only five of the boys were living at this time. Jesse Verl was only a small boy, so they took a lot of care and attention.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

History of Lillian Alcorn Rowley

I was the oldest child of Clark Alcorn, who was born 3 January 1881 in Beattyville, Lee County, Kentucky, and Harriet Ann Weaver, born 26 March 1883 in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. I was born 7 January 1904 in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. I had blue eyes and medium dark hair and weighed about four pounds.

If I remember right, Dad said they lived in the 4th Ward in Brigham City, Box Elder Stake. I was blessed on the 31 January 1904 in the Perry Ward, Box Elder Stake, by James Sheldon Nelson Sr. (who later became the Bishop of the Thatcher Ward, Bear River Stake.)

In July 1905, my parents moved into the 3rd Ward in Brigham City and on 23 October 1905 my brother Leonard Clark Alcorn was born. He had large brown eyes and dark hair. In the fall of 1905 I believe it was, Papa and Mama moved to Garland, Utah where Papa worked at the Utah-Idaho Sugar Factory. We lived in a tent for a while. That winter we moved to Thatcher, Utah and lived in one room of my Aunt Fannie and Uncle Sheldon Nelson’s home. Aunt Fannie was my mother’s older sister. Not too long after moving there, I had diphtheria. One of my cousins, Myron Nelson died with the disease.

While I was recovering from this illness, I guess I was quite cross and it seems that my brother Leonard wasn’t feeling too well either, anyway Mama was rocking him. I somehow got the big toe on my right foot under the rocking chair and my toe was crushed. To this day I have a real thick toenail.

It seems that I was quite a proud little girl and when I was all dressed up to go somewhere I would always smooth my dress down and Papa said I would try to look at myself to see if my dress looked all right and if my hair was combed. Then I would strut around the house or down the road proud as could be.

On the 1st of March 1907 my brother William Vernon was born. We still lived in the one room at Aunt Fannie’s place in Thatcher. I don’t remember him, although I had just passed my 3rd birthday. On the 10th of May 1907 Mama and Papa were going into Brigham City. Dad was going with a load of grain and he was going in a big wagon. Bishop Nelson was going in a white-topped buggy. Mama was riding with the Bishop. The wind was blowing hard and baby Vernon was fussing and crying. Bishop Nelson was becoming annoyed and asked Mama if she could not quiet the baby. Mama was always sensitive about her children disturbing anyone so she held the baby tightly to her breast. When they arrived in Brigham City, Vernon appeared lifeless and limp. They took him to a doctor and he was dead. They told Mother that he had been a victim of heart failure to spare her further heartache, but actually he had been smothered. They took him back to Penrose the next day and buried him. As they went into their room after his burial, Dad rushed in ahead of Mother to remove the pillows from the rocking chair that she had taken the baby from the day before.

Some of my first recollections are the home where my Great Grandfather, William Weaver, lived on Burch Creek. I also remember my Great Aunt Rose when she couldn’t talk above a whisper. This was also on Burch Creek, close to Ogden, I believe. I remember one time when Bishop James Sheldon Nelson Jr. got my mother’s basket at a Basket and Bow dance held in in Thatcher, Utah. He teased Leonard and me telling us he was our new Daddy. We hid behind Mother’s skirts. He teased us all evening long. The Christmas of 1908 when I was about five years old, seven or eight little girls my age were dressed in long white dresses. We had our dolls and we laid them in a cradle made out of cardboard. We knelt beside the cradle and sang, “Away in a Manger,” at the Ward Christmas program. It was in the evening and were allowed to stay and watch the older people dance. It was a night of such fun and excitement.

While we were living on the Booth place in Thatcher, Utah some geese who belonged to Hans and Minnie Anderson, (they lived next door) would chase Leonard and I into the house. I remember how we would run and the geese would flap their wings and their bills would nip at the seat of our pants. We surely would run fast. This was the first time we lived on the Booth place and Dad planted an apple tree on this place.

My brother Marvin Ballard Alcorn was born 7 July 1909 on this Booth place in Thatcher, Utah. When he was born, Leonard and I were sent over to Bishop Nelson’s place and when it was time for us to come back home, they told us that Mother had a little pig in bed at our house. We both wanted to get in bed with Mother. Leonard got to lie down next to the baby first and I was very unhappy about it.

Dad grew sugar cane and ground it up and made molasses or sorghum out of it. I remember him digging a long strip out of the ground about two or three feet wide and about six to eight feet long and he would have it opened at one end. He shoveled on a slope so he could put wood or sage brush in the cane and cook the sugar and syrup. I don’t know what he made the vat out of but he would put it over the trench and fire.

In the fall of 1909 Mother started me to school in the Thatcher Elementary School which was about a mile from our home. I had been taught to always be truthful and never tell a ‘thib” as I called it. I wasn’t six and wouldn’t be until January 1910. Anyway I was to tell the teacher, Miss Hasel Watt, that I was six years old. When Miss Watt asked me how old I was I said, “I am five years old, but Mama said for me to tell you I am six!” I went to school for two days when they stopped me. My little girlfriend, Luetta Peterson was just four days younger than I was and she went on to school and graduated from the eighth grade a year before I did. The school was a two-roomed frame building. One room was used as a chapel and the other one was used as a schoolroom and recreation hall. It stood where the Thatcher-Penrose Ward Chapel now stands.

We moved to the Oliver place in Penrose soon after this. The house was two-roomed frame house. There were two rows of old fashioned poplar trees east of the house about ten rods apart and a row down along the partition fence for about a quarter mile.

One Halloween Dad took a load of sugar beets, after dark, down along the row of poplar trees hoping pranksters wouldn’t find them, as he had them all loaded and ready to start for the beet dump early the next morning. Well, the pranksters found the load of beets and unloaded them and tipped the box upside down. Dad was really angry, but he never did find out who the boys were.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father