History: Lillian Alcorn

My only sister Melva was married in 1940 to Robert L. Goe. They were living in Salt Lake City, Utah. In May 1941, I took Marjorie and went to Utah to be with Melva when her first baby was to be born. My brother Leonard drove us in his car to Salt Lake City. Melva’s baby was born 30 May 1941 and was a lovely little girl which they named Karen. Marjorie and I returned after three weeks, on the bus. While we were gone, Grace, who was only 12 years old, took complete charge of the house and prepared the meals for all those boys. She even bottled several quarts of seedless grapes, which by the way, stayed good for years.

About this time the Branch decided to build a new chapel. A plot of ground was selected in town and the work began. It was completed and we moved into a lovely new white chapel. It was good to have more room for classes and a Relief Society room with kitchen facilities. It was good indeed and we certainly appreciated the new building.

We had an old log ice-house on our place and we would get big blocks of ice from the river every winter and fill the ice-house. It would last long into the summer months.

I gave birth to another baby on 14 May 1942. It was a lovely red-haired little girl. She was the first baby I had that was born in a hospital. We named her Sharon Lee Rowley. She was very quiet, sweet and loveable baby and was a real joy to us. This precious baby was not to be ours for very long, at least in mortality. She was a frail baby and we soon learned that she had asthma.

One Sunday morning, 27 September 1942 while Dave and the boys were doing chores, Sharon had a bad choking spell. She couldn’t seem to breath nor stop coughing and choking. I sent Grace after Dave and he sent one of the boys across the ditch for Francis. Dave and Francis got to the house about the same time. By this time, Sharon had from all appearances stopped breathing. Dave took her and I got the consecrated oil and he and Francis administered to her. She still seemed lifeless and Dave began to work her left arm up and down similar to working a pump handle. Within a minute or so she started breathing again and we rejoiced and thanked our Father in Heaven for his blessings to us and for the power of the priesthood which was in our home.

The next day we took Sharon to the hospital in Havre, about 40 miles from Harlem. I was allowed to stay right there with her. Although Sharon had always been a quiet baby and hadn’t smiled much in her short life, she seemed to smile and be quite content there in the hospital. Then on Wednesday, 30 September 1942 in the late afternoon, Dave and I were standing by her crib and she talked, cooed and smiled and seemed to be trying to tell us that this is the way things were supposed to be. She died about 5:00 p.m. that evening. It was a great loss to me and the family. A close friend at the time gave us the following poem in which we found much comfort.

-A PRAYER-

O Father, help me to understand and know the reason why,
The Child that Thou dids’t give to me so early had to die.
Why one who’s life had been so pure, who never knew deceit
Should droop and wither like a flower crushed under ruthless feet.

O Father, help me to understand Thy purpose divine,
In letting death, with ruthless hand, tear her dear heart from mine.
O, let me see the veil beyond where dwells her spirit pure,
And l know she is happy where she had gone, O let me feel secure.

Forgive the surging doubts that rise within my aching heart,
And take the dimness from mine eyes, let darkness all depart.
Let light and knowledge come to me from Heaven, Thy home on high.
O, help me put my trust in Thee, O Father, tell me why!

Perhaps I sin in asking this, more faith should show in thee,
But, Oh I miss her loving kiss, she was so dear to me.
Just let me know that I sometime shall find her once again,
And clasp again her form to me, I as in Jesus’ name, Amen!

-AN ANSWER-

Grieve not, my daughter, for time shall be when death shall be no more,
Thy loved one I’ll return to thee to cherish evermore.
“Twas in the plan that man should die and slumber in the grave,
But rise again as even I, for this my life I gave.

For mortal life is but a part of God’s eternity.
In which the souls of men embark to find felicity.
What men call death is but a step from low to higher plane.
And all who in the dust have slept, though me, shall live again.

Then grieve not for the one that’s gone, let your heart despair,
For God in wisdom called your child to work for Him up there.
The prison gates to open wide for those who died in sin,
And through repentance them to guide, again to worship him.

Let this, then be your answer why, and let your heart rejoice,
for until God they do not die who to His voice.
But walk with Him is realms of love where all the righteous be,
be comforted, for there above, Thy child shall welcome thee!

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

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History: Lillian Alcorn

In the first stages of this winter, when the river started to freeze over Dave’s folks let their cattle water and they got down on the ice and it gave way. They lost around 15 head of cattle. Even though they got them out they froze to death. Some of them went under the ice and some froze to death right in the water and some after they got them out.

The children were growing very fast. Grace started to school while we were working for the Johnson’s. She went to a little white school house about half a mile away from home. She was such a cute little girl for her age and very responsible in doing things she was asked to do. She was my baby-sitter when I wanted or needed to go places. But David was just as mischievous as Grace was dependable. David had to be doing something all the time. One day about the time Grace started school my father and his mother came to see us so we were able to get this four generation picture.

In the summer of 1936 we found that the Spud Murphey place was up for sale by the owner, Mrs. D. M. Tait who lived in Pasadena, California. George Watkins had been renting it for several years and wanted to buy it. Dave wrote to Mrs. Tait and offered $2400 for the place. We got a letter right back from her and she said that Mr. Watkins had offered $3000, and that if we would split the difference she would sell the place to us instead. It seemed that Mr. Watkins has misrepresented the truth and taken advantage of her lack of knowledge of conditions. So Dave met her attorney in Helena and they signed a contract.

Dave then located a house out in the hills where he had been building reservoirs. The house belonged to Mrs. Zollicoffer. Most of the windows were broken out and most of the doors were gone, but Dave offered her $30 for it and she took it. So we moved it down on the place but didn’t get a chance to put it on a firm foundation. Instead we just blocked it up. We had become so involved with getting our spring planting done and all our crops in. we lived in a small house on the corner of Dad Rowley’s place. Then one day a big wind came and blew the two-story house off its blocking and some of the blocks went up through the floor. It completely ruined the house. So we had to postpone moving into our own place for a while longer.

Francis and Erma had been running the Thomas Everett place but lost the lease and didn’t have any place to go, so he and Dave made a deal. Francis took the west half of the Murphy place and he was to pay half of the cost of the place. It wasn’t long before Francis moved an old house onto his side of the farm and we lived in part of that house.

While we were living in this house I decided to go to an auction sale with some of my friends. My baby wasn’t due for another couple of weeks so I felt safe in going. It was late October and beginning to get cold. After I got home I fed the family and laid down to rest. At 8:00 p.m. that evening I gave birth to my sixth child, a very welcome little girl. It was 28 October 1936. She weighed about 8 lbs. and was an hour old when the Doctor finally got there. We decided to name this new daughter Margie but when Dave was up blessing her he named her Marjorie Ann Rowley. We were all thrilled with her and all wanted to take care of her. Grace didn’t feel so much alone now, as she had a sister whom she loved and cared for.

Since the first house we bought had been ruined, Dave made arrangements to get the buildings off the old Crawford dairy farm and we moved them down onto our property. We dug a full-sized basement, ran the cement and put the house on it. The other building included a granary and a garage (which Dave gave to Francis for helping) and some chicken coops. We got all these buildings set up on the place and when Marjorie was about a year old we moved into the first real home of our own. This was a wonderful thing for our family.

The plot of ground where we had to set the house was gumbo soil and in wet weather it would stick to our feet so badly that one could hardly walk. The old saying was that if someone would walk across the yard and find a place to clean his shoes off, he would have the starting of a good farm. It was hard to keep a house clean in wet weather especially in that kind of soil. The children were growing so fast and were so energetic and were always doing something and every time they came in the house they left a trail of this gumbo soil.

We always had a lovely garden and with our chickens and cows we got along fine. We had no barns or buildings for our cattle and with those cold winters it proved trying to us. Dave would go out to milk the cows and they would have frozen tits. The men would nearly freeze themselves before they would get through milking. All we had for our protection was a corral and some boards put up for a wind breaker.

As I said, we could live off the place but we had to have machinery and supplies, so we took out a loan with the Federal Security Association. We got our machinery to operate the farm and bought some more cows. But from then on we were under their supervision; however, we still enjoyed our new home and the security of being on our own. We were where our children could play and run on that which was ours. Our home was half a mile from the Branch Chapel where we held our services and other activities.

We were always active in the Church. I tried to instill in my children a desire and pride in attending to their Church duties. I started this when they were as young as two weeks. I worked in the Relief Society and was a Primary Teacher. Dave was teaching in Sunday School and MIA and was chairman of The Genealogical Committee.

In the summer of 1938 we found we were going to have another blessed event in the family. We were very happy and thankful. This would be our seventh child. Before the baby arrived we had some very cold weather. On 29 January 1939 the baby was born. It was 10 minutes past midnight and 40˚ below zero. Being in the middle of the night all the other children were asleep. Douglas heard the baby cry though and called out, “What’s pulling the cat’s tail?” he didn’t realize that at that moment another new soul had just breathed his first breath of life. This baby was a beautiful baby boy with red hair. It was our third red-head and we named him Hugh Alcorn Rowley.

In the summer of 1939 Dave bought a good high-roofed barn from up north of Zurich for $250, and then hired Carl Dolovan to move it down on the farm for us. Dave had the foundations all poured and ready and they set the barn right on the foundations. Dave then fixed it up. He made half of it for the cows and the other half was fixed to handle two teams of horses and a grain bin. It also had a hay loft which held almost enough hay for the whole winter. When we bought the house it didn’t have many cabinets or working space, and I needed more. Dave looked around at some that other people had and then built a lovely set of cabinets for me. We had a nice kitchen sink, although we didn’t have a drain for it. I used to keep a five gallon bucket under the sink to catch the water and then the kids would dump it for me. We didn’t have running water so there wasn’t too much danger of the water running over.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

Well, along in March, Mr. Eppler sent us a statement that we were $2.50 overdrawn and he wanted Dave to come in and pay it up. However, according to the account Dave kept, he still owed us over $18.00. So Dave jumped on a saddle horse and went in to see him. Dave took the receipts and they figured out the same as ours. Dave told him so and he said that we had made a mistake or didn’t have all the tickets and that he wanted us to pay the $2.50. Dave told him that he still owed us some $18.00 and Mr. Eppler got pretty mean about it, so Dave threatened to take it down to the courthouse and let the court figure it. Mr. Eppler pretty quickly changed his tone and offered to do anything, but he didn’t want the matter brought before the court and made public.

Well after losing all we had in the Lee Morgan episode we moved back to the farm with Dave’s folks on the old Jake Everett place. Francis and my brother Leonard rented the Thomas Everett place below Harlem.

In the spring of 1933, on 14 April, we had another arrival. A little red-headed boy we named Ralph Alcorn Rowley. He was very cute, but he cried quite a bit. He found out early in life that he could get much of what he wanted by crying for it and it became a habit that later was hard to break. He always seemed to like to lead and had a great determination to do what he thought was right. Ralph was born in a little house on Dad Rowley’s place and Dr. Hoone was our Doctor again. He came out to the house and took care of us. A little to the east of the house and across the fence was the Branch Chapel. While back from the road a ways was Dad Rowley’s house, buildings and yards.

On the west ran the sleepy Milk River. Sleepy, that is except when the ice broke up in the spring and we had many ice jams and much high water from heavy rains and melting snow in the spring. It was during one of these high waters and floods that all of the music I had collected over the years was destroyed, which upset me very much because some of it could not be replaced.

The soil here was very sandy and wonderful garden soil and again we raised a wonderful garden. It seemed so hard to get back on our feet again financially that it was really discouraging at times. I was very blue part of the time, but I had only to look at my growing children to spark a smile. Douglas and Ralph were fast becoming bosom pals and David was the “big brother” and was a big help in keeping them happy and content. The children certainly help to brighten my outlook many times.

Dave trapped in the winters and took care of stock and continued farming in the summer. Then in the spring of 1934 Dave started to work for A.L. Johnson on his farm. Mr. Johnson was working for the government on the Indian Reservation and Dave and the Johnson boys took care of the farm. They irrigated, put in crops, harvested and took care of a herd of sheep, a herd of cattle and other stock.

On 6 October 1934 another blessed event took place. A little red-headed boy was born. He was named and blessed Clayton Alcorn Rowley. He wasn’t as healthy and robust as the others had been and for a long while we thought we were going to lose him. Once while Dave was in town, Clayton became quite ill. I had no way to contact Dave to have him bring something home from town for the baby and I was nearly frantic with worry. When Dave arrived home he had some milk of magnesia with him. He had felt that something was wrong at home and felt impressed to get some milk of Magnesia so he did. We gave some to Clayton and it was just what he needed. It settled his stomach and he quieted down and slept. Another time he became quite ill and we sent for the Doctor, but Dave and Brother Elmer Hulse administered to him and when the doctor came he said there was nothing wrong with him and he was well from that day on. But before the blessing we thought that almost every breath would be his last. It was through the wonderful power of the Priesthood that this precious little red-head was spared. He was our fifth child, all of which we are very grateful for.

That winter was a very hard winter and Dave rode horse back to and from work all winter long. Of course, I stayed home and took care of our four boys and one girl. In the early spring of 1935, Mr. Johnson fixed us up a small house there on the place and we moved over there. We were handy to the work and were better able to help with the chores. We worked for the Johnson’s for two years and our only trouble was with Bruce who was nothing but a small kid, but he thought he should run the whole deal. He was also full of mischief.

While on the Johnson place, David and Clair, one of the Johnson boys, were playing in back of the house. There was a lovely wooded area back there ideal for boyhood play. I looked out the window one day and the woods were on fire. David and Clair had set fire to the woods. We were fortunate to put it out and no one was hurt. It had certainly given me a scare though.

The winter we were there was one of the coldest winters we ever saw. The temperature would go down to about 56˚ below zero at night and then back up to 40˚ below zero during the day. The frost gathered on the walls in our bedroom, mostly behind the bed, until it was about half an inch thick. We had only one stove in the house and that was in the kitchen. It was a large Majestic range and then we only had one other room which was the small bedroom.

Dave made a figure four trap and during the worst part of the winter he trapped Chinese pheasants which we ate and canned. They surely tasted good. The snow was deep and they would come up to feed off the feeds lots when Dave would leave after putting the grain out for the sheep and cattle.

There were none of the children going to school the first year at the Johnson’s and I had to keep them in the house through those real cold spells. The telephone and electric wires would get so thick and heavy with frost that they looked like they were several inches thick and our windows had ice frozen clear to the top of them. There was sort of a swale behind the house in which grew some brush and small trees. They would get very heavy-laden with frost and it was one of the most beautiful sights one could imagine. Such beauty as you sometimes see in the early stages of cold weather on the window panes only it had a much deeper background.

We weren’t bothered too much with the cold unless the wind blew. When the wind would blow the cold was much more penetrating, but then we had both coal and wood to burn and a good stove to keep us warm. Most every morning during the really cold spells, Dave had to go out and cut the sheep loose from the ground. There would always be some of them frozen down. That is or their wool would freeze to the ground and they couldn’t get up off the ground until they were cut loose.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

We had a coal and wood stove and the winters were very cold. We had a range in the kitchen and a regular heater in the living room. One morning I went in and stoked up the coals in the heater and laid the poker underneath the heater. David was just learning to walk and wasn’t walking very well. He had followed me into the living room and when I left the room he picked up the hot poker and started for the kitchen. Coming in he fell and the hot poker fell across the back of his neck and he screamed and cried. I ran in there and saw the hot poker lying across the back of his neck and grabbed it off and put it back. I picked David up and his poor little neck looked like burned beef. I called Dave and we took him to the Doctor. The Doctor thought that he had badly injured some of the tendons and that he would never be able to use or turn his neck normally again. But we were blessed and although it took a long time healing and left a terrible scar he was able to use his neck normally and never suffered ill effects from it.

David was a busy little boy and had to be doing something all the time. We bought him a new pair of shoes and put them on him. But the next time we looked for them we couldn’t find them anyplace. Later Dave found them out in the field in an irrigation ditch. Another time Grace had a pretty little doll and David threw it down the outside toilet. My sister Melva said she would get it out for us and went down one whole head first, but the poor girl got stuck! We couldn’t get her out and finally had to call Dave from the fields to get Melva out. We did get the doll too. Still another time I bought myself a new hat and laid it on the table to wear to Relief Society and it disappeared. We could not find it anyplace. When Dave carried the slop out to the pigs that night, it was in the bucket. Yes our little David was surely mischievous and had to be doing something all the time.

Grace was a mild, sweet-dispositioned child and always wanted to be doing something to help me. She soon learned to do many things that were very helpful to me. Mother Rowley had a Maytag power washing machine. We had an old Speed Queen and ours broke down so I took my clothes down to Mother Rowley’s to wash. Sometimes we were home alone and Dave would harness up old Babe before he went to the fields. My sister Melva and I would hitch her up and bundle up the children and then with the clothes off we would go on the sleigh down to Mother Rowley’s to do our washing. We did this part of the summer and into the winter. One day the sleigh slid off the road and dumped all of us in the snow. But old Babe was very quiet and gently stood there until we got things straightened up and then we went on and got the washing done.

In November 1931 we lost 13 head of cattle through the ice. Even though Dave got them out they froze to death before we could get them dried off. That winter we again had severe weather. There were blizzards and very cold and miserable weather to endure. The drifts sometimes blocked the road and no one could get into town or anywhere. Feeding our stock during these bad spells was very difficult. It was also hard to keep many of the homes warm enough and people had been known to freeze to death in their sleep. Life wasn’t too pleasant in the wintertime.

Our winter brightened very much, however, with the addition of another baby to our little family. On 14 December 1931 another boy was born and Dr. Hoone of Chinook took care of the baby and I. He was a very healthy, good-natured baby. He was blessed by Dave and named Douglas Alcorn Rowley. He had blonde curly hair and was really cute. His Grandfather Rowley called him his little “goldilocks.” His hair was naturally curly and I just assisted it a little and made it look more uniform in the curl.

Douglas was born while we were living on the old Merrill place across the road from the Milk River, and dead water channel. During that 1931-32 depression, when it was difficult to get money out of anything we sold our beet for $4.00 a ton and hat at $4.00 a ton. Wheat sold for $0.08 a bushel and other things accordingly, which didn’t even pay the expense of production. When Dave took our best check into the bank to deposit it and went back the next day to pay off our best labor the Bank had closed its door and couldn’t issue a check.

We decided we couldn’t sell our wheat for $0.08 a bushel so we fed out a lot of hogs. But when he had them all fed, we couldn’t sell the hogs and we gave many of them away or got rid of them as best we could.

A friend of Dave’s, Guy Nystrom, had a large herd of good cattle and he was very old. He put the money to buy his winter’s hay into the bank and when it closed its doors he lost all his money and he died a week later. Many people, businesses, and etc. were going broke and many people were hungry and starving.

Dave’s brother, Francis had bought the old Lee Morgan place in the spring of 1928 and had been doing quite well on it. Then the fall of 1932 when he couldn’t even pay his taxes the bank foreclosed on the mortgage, they took the place and all of our stock. Dave had signed the note with him and consequently we lost all of our material possessions as well, even the things we had before the note was signed. There was about $5,000 balance left on the place and all. Between us and Francis we had at least $10,000 worth of stock and chattel, besides the place. Dave asked the bank to sell it on time because no one had any money, but they said it had to be cash. They sold out the whole thing for $1,006. Then they wanted us to finish paying the balance of about $4,000. They sold the note to a Mr. Harbolt in Chinook and he came and tried to collect. Finally Dave and Francis paid him $200 for the papers (which was about two years later). Believe me these depressions are not fun and it has broken many people.

In November of 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected as President of the United States and one of the first things he did was to declare a bank holiday and make it so no bank could go broke and cause so many people to lose their life’s savings. He then started the NRA (National Recovery Administration) and PWA (Public Works Administration) and etc. to get people on jobs so they could make a living and it surely helped many, where it was handled right and in an honest way.

Dave went to work on the NRA with a four horse team building reservoirs on sub marginal land above and north of Chinook. He made $11.00 a day for nine days a month which I think was more money than he had ever earned and it helped out more, too. Yet there were those who tried to take advantage of the program and did. Dave also trapped skunk and etc. to try and make ends meet.

Some of the first work Dave did for the NRA was to haul gravel for the roads when it was 40˚ below zero weather with a wind blowing. His wages were turned over to different stores so we could get groceries and the things that we needed. Our account was turned over to a Joe Eppler who ran a little store. Dave had heard that he was very crooked so he kept his own account of all the groceries we got. The weather was getting awful cold and we didn’t have money to buy children the clothes they needed. Mr. Eppler stocked some clothes, but not very many and he didn’t have the clothes we needed for the children. He said he wouldn’t get them for us either, even though he had quite a bit of our money. Finally the children got sick and he wouldn’t let us have money to get medicine. Dave went to the druggist and he let us have the medicine and then Dave did some work for him to pay for it.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

Dave went back out to the Morrison and Butler Ranch to help put up hay, irrigate and break horses. He stayed there until harvest started then he came back to help his folks harvest the crops and didn’t go back out to the Butler ranch. Dave and I started to go steady and we went most everywhere together. We both loved to dance and spent many enjoyable evenings dancing at Church socials. The winter passed fast. In the spring of 1927 Dad bought the old Sam Taylor farm three miles west of Harlem on the banks of the Milk River. It had an old log house on it with a dirt roof. It was a hard house to keep clean as the dirt kept sifting down through the roof.

In March 1927, Dave and I went to a dance at the Agency and on the way home Dave proposed to me. This marriage proposal was a little different from the usual. Dave said that he thought we could be married in March, but he had to pay his tithing and he didn’t have enough money left. But we did set the date and were married 14 July 1927.

Dave’s dad and my dad drove to Chinook with us to the home of President Wallace Peterson of the Chinook Branch where we were married by the law of the land. As we were leaving Brother Peterson’s home we backed out of the door so we could tell people we had backed out and came home. There was a big social at the Harlem Branch Chapel that night so each of us went to our own homes that night as we would not be shivered. Bert Murphy was going to broadcast the news, but Dave got hold of him and stopped him from doing it. At the social, which was a farewell party for Will Southwick, I sang the song “I Wish I had Someone to Love Me,” in pig-latin. Not many understood it, but they all seemed to enjoy it. The following night was MIA and the young people had a good time trying to shiveree[1] us a little. They pushed me around in a wheelbarrow for a while and were going to separate us and take us different places but Dave put a stop to that.

Well, we moved into a little two-room log cabin with Dave’s brother Francis and his wife. Francis and Erma lived in one room and Dave and I in the other room. We lived there the first summer we were married. Dave and Francis had rented this place from the Indian Reservation there. It was all dry farm and mostly meadow hay or wild hay. They broke a lot of meadow and planted grain and corn. They also raised a lot of cattle.

Dave and I wanted to get a place of our own so when in the fall of 1927 we heard that the Lee Morgan ranch was up in Paradise Valley and that it had been taken over by the Harlem Bank and put up for sale, we considered it. A friend of ours, Wren Stoddard who had told us about it came out to our place and  he and Dave got in Wren’s car and went right up to look it over. That night we prayed about it and Dave had a strange dream. In it he had been wrestling with Leo Morgan. He could throw Lee, but couldn’t get away from him at all. The next morning we talked it over and decided not to buy the farm. Dave went over to his dad’s place and told his folks and Francis that we weren’t going to buy it and Francis said that if Dave and I wouldn’t buy the Morgan place, he was going to buy it. So in the spring of 1928 Francis bought the placed and Dave signed the note with him. This later proved to be a big mistake for us. Well, anyway Dave and I stayed and helped his father operate his place for the next two years.

Dave and Wren Stoddard hauled coal in the winter from the Hebbleman Mine about 10 miles southwest of where we lived. They would haul it into town and sell it. They usually left before daylight and got back home about noon. Then they would take it into town and unload it and get back for the evening chores. One morning when they left the stars were shining brightly and the sky was very clear, but about seven or eight am a bad blizzard started and kept getting worse and worse. As the day proceeded you couldn’t see but a few feet in front of you. This lasted most of the day but began to clear off just before sundown. They got home about an hour after sundown. Needless to say, Mary and I were mighty concerned. Wren and Mary Stoddard were some of our closest friends.

The winters were very severe and oft times the temperature went down to 40˚ below and would stay that way for several nights and would rise only a little in the daytime. Most of the time when it was really cold the air would be quiet but there were times when the wind would blow fiercely and sometimes to gale proportions. This would pile up the snow in great drifts and make it almost impossible to go anywhere for a while. But we always had plenty of wood or coal and would keep the house warm. It was so dreary on these cold windy days with the windows making such a tumult of noise and draft. It made one really feel how small and helpless men are in the face of the elements; and how much we depend on our Father in Heaven for our well-being and protection. How little we appreciate the many blessings we have from day to day.

When Dave and I were first married we made several resolves. One was that we would always try and express our appreciation to our Heavenly Father for our many blessings. At times we weren’t as faithful in this as we should have been but we did try. Another resolve we made was that there would never be any foul language, talk or jokes that wouldn’t be fit for anyone else to hear used in our home. We both worked in the Church. I was still an MIA Counselor and Sunday School Teacher. Dave was the Boy Scout leader and an MIA Counselor and a Sunday School Teacher. Dave was ordained an Elder by John G. Allred n on 7 August 1927.

I always enjoyed Church and the inspiration it gave me to better living; even the messages from Sunday to Sunday, the Inspiration to do better. The joy one gets out of living and abiding by the principles of the Gospel, the satisfaction of realizing you’ve done something to help someone else. I love the gospel and all it has done for me to help me understand a better way of life. The many things I have to be thankful for and I pray that I’ll always be able to live so that I’ll be worthy of all these many blessings.

By April 1928, I knew our home was going to be blessed with one of the greatest blessings anyone could pray for. We were going to have a baby. We were both overjoyed and we began to plan. Along with the housework, I then prepared for the addition to our family. It gave me so much joy and happiness to know that we were going to have such a great blessing and the months seemed to drag by. It seemed as though September would never get here. I spent much of this waiting alone as Dave worked long hours in the fields and took care of a lot of stock and raised a fine garden.

[1] a mock serenade with kettles, pans, horns, and other noisemakers given for a newly married couple

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

The dressings on Mother’s cancer had to be changed every little while as it was constantly draining. She was in so much pain all the time that her ordinary pleasant disposition was sometimes very difficult to satisfy and I tried hard to do whatever she wanted or to get whatever she needed. Father and the older boys had to be away most of the time making a living. Thinning, weeding and topping beets and most any other kind of work they could do to keep the family together and all healthy. In spite of our efforts after Mother died, Verl was adopted out to the Bishop Perry family and I went into the fields and worked with the rest of the family. So besides caring for the needs of the younger children, Dad and the housework, I was thinning, hoeing and weeding and topping beets with the rest of them.

There was time, now and then, for me to spend with my friends and to enjoy the out of doors. I loved the hills around where we lived and I loved to hike and tramp around these hills. We used to go over to where Indians had lived long ago and inspect the writings that we found on the cliffs there. I have often showed my children and grandchildren these same cliffs and hills and caves that I enjoyed so much as a young girl and lady. They seemed to enjoy exploring them as much as I did. I also enjoyed horseback riding.

In 1924 Dad and I went on a trip to California. The change was good for us and we enjoyed it very much. As we went over the California border we had a sack of oranges with us and they wouldn’t allow us to take them into the state, so we peeled them all and sat there in the car and ate every one of them. I didn’t think I could eat another orange as long as I lived. But I still enjoy them.

In the spring of 1925 after thinning beets until the season was over we decided to go to Harlem, Montana and work for the season and then come back to Utah. But instead of coming back to Utah we rented the Amos Everett Ranch about six and a half miles east of Harlem, Blaine Co., Montana. We farmed 160 acres of ground and as usual I did my share of work in the fields. We thinned, topped and worked in the beets. We also had about 1500 chickens which were my responsibility. The boys did the chore of keeping the coops clean and most of the manual work pertaining to their care and I took care of the rest. Sometimes my work in the house made it impossible for me to do much with the chickens. At these times the boys would fill in and take care of them for me. I appreciated this help very much.

Dad was a good provider and he tried hard to be one with us in going out to dances and socials and etc. He was anxious to see that we all had good times. I was very much afraid of my father and tried awfully hard to do whatever he wanted.

It was while we lived on the Amos Everett ranch that we all went to Church in the LDS Chapel which was 3 ½ miles west of Harlem. We had a nice old chapel, one large room divided into classrooms by curtains. Albert L. Johnson was Branch President with Angus Young and Chris Stuker as counselors and A. Lorenzo Stoddard as Branch Clerk. They asked me to work as a Counselor in the YWMIA with Martha Southwick as President and Alma Turner as 1st Counsellor. Mary Stoddard was the secretary/treasurer.

We had many enjoyable meetings in this little old chapel. It used to be a recreation hall out in the hills northeast of Harlem which our Branch bought. They cut it in two and moved it into the valley and out on the corner of the Jake Everett farm. They put it back together and fixed it up for a meeting place which was used for about twenty years. There was an old-fashioned pot-bellied stove at one end of the building which kept it plenty warm, even on the coldest of days.

I was blessed with a fair singing voice and was called upon quite often to sing in various programs. I enjoyed this very much. Some of my favorite songs were: “The Prisoner’s Song” – “’Twas a Cold Stormy Night” – “What’s the Use of Being Good” – among others. My favorite Christmas song was “Star of the East” which I often sang. I had quite a collection of music but during one of the spring runoff floods of the Milk River I lost all of it which made me very unhappy. Some of the music was not replaceable.

While we were living on the Amos Everett place the family went to a dance in Zurich which was about twenty miles away. We went in the old Ford car. I had become pretty well acquainted with the young people of the area and when a man came up to me and asked for a dance I told him I didn’t know him and I didn’t dance with strangers. Soon a friend, Bert Murphy, came and asked me if I would like to meet a young man and he introduced me to David William Rowley from Lohman, Montana. Lo and behold, this was the same young man who had invited me to dance. He asked around until he found someone who knew me and asked him to introduce us. Well, after this proper introduction I accepted a dance with him and was very much impressed with him, however I didn’t see him again for a long time. Dave told his brother Emerson that night that he had met his future wife.

Sometime later our agricultural field agent came to see us about our farm practices and he was invited to have dinner with us. We all knew Brother Barnes, the field agent, but the man that was with him was Hugh T. Rowley and a stranger. Upon introduction and hearing the name Rowley, I asked if he knew Dave and come to find out he was Dave’s father. I also found out that Dave taught a Sunday School class in the Chinook Branch. At that time though, he was working back in the hills on Clear Creek on the Morrison & Butler farms. Just before I was to serve dinner I discovered I was out of butter and not knowing what to do I put some food coloring in some shortening and passed it off as butter and no one ever knew the difference. This was in the early spring of 1926.

The Rowley’s rented the Colgrove place that spring and moved to Harlem and started to go to the Harlem Branch to Church. I became very well acquainted with Verda, Dave’s only sister. Verda later became the wife of Bert Murphy, the friend who had introduced me to Dave. Verda and I became good friends and I enjoyed her company very much. Dave wasn’t with the family when they moved to Harlem. He was still working on the Morrison & Butler farms. The farms were located about 14 miles southwest of Chinook, Montana and Chinook was about 20 miles from Harlem. It was a large sheep and hay ranch.

Well, My Dad and the boys got the crops in that Spring, mostly beets and potatoes. The crop did very well and the chickens started to lay early and that really helped us in paying our expenses. In May, Dave came home from the Ranch and helped his folks put in their crops and then went back to put up hay for Morrison and Butler. While he was in the valley though, we went out on several dates. With Verda and I as good friends and Leonard and Francis who became good friends we had some very good times together.

I had a lot of responsibility caring for my Mother’s family and I learned to be a hard and fast worker in all I had to do. I cooked and cared for the family and our hired help. One time one of the men made a remark in town that all they had for breakfast at Alcorn’s place was a prayer and cereal. The word got back to me so the next morning all I put on the table was cereal and as usual we had our morning prayer. The hired man asked if that was all we were going to eat and I repeated to him what he had told the fellows in town a few days before, that man learned a good lesson and we all had a good laugh.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

Updates

This Day In Our Family History; December 11, 2016

Added Categories:

Deleted Italic
Changed wording to initiatory ordinances and fixed spelling on eternity

  • This Day In Our Family History
  • Nels Rosenquist Nelson – 25
  • Grace Viola Harper – 26
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; December 11, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Friday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50
  • Emily Louisa Miller – 118

This Day In Our Family History; December 11, 2017

Removed Elizabeth Lunt from endowed on this day

Added Categories:

  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Harriet Gibbons – 68
  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 154
  • Charles Benjamin Harper – 67
  • EHOUS – Endowment House; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Elizabeth Ellis – 482
  • James Wood – 247
  • Ann Amos – 248
  • John Lunt – 242
  • Edward Lunt – 481
  • MANTI – Manti Utah Temple; Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States
  • William Wood – 487
  • Ann Elston – 243
  • Ann Wood – 488
  • Grace Viola Harper – 26
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Nels Rosenquist Nelson – 25

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; December 11, 2017

Added Categories:

  • John Thompson Rowley – 197
  • Jane Paul – 198
  • David William Rowley – 30
  • Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
  • Marjorie Ann Rowley – 36
  • Orem, Utah, Utah, United States
  • September 26
  • 1957
  • Provo, Utah, Utah, United States
  • Hugh Thompson Rowley – 85
  • Douglas Alcorn Rowley – 33
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • November 4
  • Clayton Alcorn Rowley – 35
  • Crescent City, Del Norte, California, United States
  • October

This Day In Our Family History; December 12, 2017

Fixed were to was
Fixed Anna Amos to Ann Amos

Added Categories:

  • Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Ann Diana Wood – 490
  • Ann Amos – 248
  • Elizabeth Elton Lunt – 244
  • Mary Lunt – 245
  • James Wood – 247
  • William Wood – 487
  • Ann Wood – 488
  • Elizabeth Ellis – 482
  • MANTI – Manti Utah Temple; Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States
  • John Lunt – 242
  • Edward Lunt – 483
  • Elizabeth Lunt – 484
  • Edward Lunt – 481
  • Joseph Wood – 489
  • Whittemore, Kossuth, Iowa, United States
  • Rachel Phipps – 574
  • Mary Phipps – 575
  • Joseph Phipps – 578
  • Clifton Hyrum Harper – 75
  • Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States
  • Eva Pearl Sperry – 56
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; December 12, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Emerson Adis Rowley – 88
  • Eureka, Humboldt, California, United States
  • May 1
  • 1957
  • Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada
  • Hugh Thompson Rowley – 85
  • Grace Davis – 86
  • Milo, Bonneville, Idaho, United States
  • John Thompson Rowley – 197
  • Jane Paul – 198
  • San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
  • November 16
  • August 31
  • Arcata, Humboldt, California, United States
  • Clayton Alcorn Rowley – 35
  • David William Rowley – 30
  • Lillian Alcorn – 31
  • Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; December 13, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Sunday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; December 13, 2017

Added Categories:

  • New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Slimbridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Benjamin Harper – 153
  • Elizabeth Phipps Brand – 154
  • Saint Mary’s, Haggerston, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
  • Charles Wood – 250
  • Ann Diane Wood – 490
  • Elizabeth Betsy Spencer – 294
  • William Olpin – 300
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Daniel Olpin – 303

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; December 13, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Verda May Rowley – 88
  • Chinook, Blaine, Montana, United States
  • Thule, Greenland
  • Dallas, Dallas, Texas, United States
  • Hill, Montana, United States
  • Hugh Francis Rowley – 87
  • Hugh Thompson Rowley – 85
  • John Thompson Rowley – 197
  • Jane Paul – 198
  • Alaska, United States
  • Bremerton, Kitsap, Washington, United States
  • November 26
  • Provo, Utah, Utah, United States
  • Kalispell, Flathead, Montana, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; December 14, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Monday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16
  • Emily Esther Sperry – 50

This Day In Our Family History; December 14, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Douglas Alcorn Rowley – 33
  • Harlem, Blaine, Montana, United States
  • David William Rowley – 30
  • Lillian Alcorn – 31
  • Stephen Brand – 570
  • Enoch Brand – 571
  • Eliza May Rowley – 202

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; December 14, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Tacoma, Pierce, Washington, United States
  • Olympia, Thurston, Washington, United States
  • De Tour, Oakland, Michigan, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; December 15, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Tuesday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; December 15, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • Aaron George Sperry – 282
  • Della Lunt – 21
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; December 16, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Wednesday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; December 16, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Josiah H. Miller – 284
  • Bolton, Chittenden, Vermont, United States
  • Robert Miller – 522
  • Ame Sarah Barnett – 523
  • Elizabeth Lunt – 103
  • Willenhall, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Edward Lunt – 100
  • Harriet Wood – 101
  • Rhoda Ann Webb – 138
  • Charles Gilbert Lunt – 19
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; December 16, 2017

Added Categories:

  • October
  • San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
  • Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Havre, Hill, Montana, United States
  • November 25
  • 1957
  • Hugh Francis Rowley – 87
  • Kalispell, Flathead, Montana, United States
  • John Thompson Rowley – 197
  • Jane Paul – 198
  • Alaska, United States
  • Douglas Alcorn Rowley – 33
  • Sunday
  • December 1
  • November 30
  • Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
  • October 27

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; December 17, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Thursday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; December 17, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Cambridge, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
  • John Francis Gibbons – 163
  • Saint Pancres Camden, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
  • John Gibbons – 161
  • Sarah Wild Cole – 162
  • Charles Alonzo Sperry – 48
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • Charles Henry Sperry – 46
  • Caroline Webb – 47
  • MANTI – Manti Utah Temple; Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States
  • Verda May Rowley – 88
  • Cardston, Alberta, Canada
  • Retta Sperry – 53
  • LANGE – Los Angeles California Temple; Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Olive Dove Doke – 84
  • Modesto, Stanislaus, California, United States
  • Endowed On This Day

John Rowley and Sarah Wright Family Messenger; December 17. 2017

Added Category:

  • David William Rowley – 30

Journal: Jeanette Sperry; December 18, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Friday
  • Jeanette Sperry – 16

This Day In Our Family History; December 18, 2017

Added Categories:

  • Sutton Colfield, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
  • Henry Gibbons – 165
  • John Gibbons – 161
  • Sarah Wild Cole – 162
  • Saint Pancres, Camdentown, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
  • William Dixon Bolton – 188
  • Emma Della Sperry – 54
  • Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States
  • SLAKE – Salt Lake Utah Temple; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • LANGE – Los Angeles California Temple; Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Archie Harold Alcorn – 97
  • Rosemead, Los Angeles, California, United States