History: Lillian Alcorn

The boys were active in the Future Farmers of America organization in school and had projects of chickens and pigs at home. Douglas had the chickens and Clayton had the pigs. One Saturday afternoon, the boys had all gone to the movie except Grant and Hugh. Clayton’s pig was due to have a litter anytime and it happened while the boys were at the show and Dave was at work. I took Hugh into town and sent him into the theater to get the boys. When he found them they were in the middle of the row and Hugh couldn’t get to them so he said in a loud whisper, “Clayton, Clayton, come quick, your pig is having chickens!” Needless to say this brought down the house as all the people around the boys heard Hugh’s excited declaration and had a good laugh.

27 September 1950 was a day of mixed emotions for me. I received word that Grace had given birth to another lovely little girl the named Donna Diane; and we also received word that my father, Clark Alcorn had died (27 September) in Idaho, and they were having his funeral 3 October 1950. We wanted to go to the funeral, but we couldn’t decide whether or not to take the family. Dave remembered that at his Dad’s funeral, he was the only one without his family, so we decided to take the children and go to Harlem. We made arrangements to leave and had a safe trip. It was good to see many of our relatives and friends again, and all of my brothers and sister were together again for the first time in a long while. Even Verl was able to make it. It was a reunion, saddened only by the purpose.

Dave’s employers had both been drafted back into the Armed Services, and so his job was gone and in looking for the other work, we found that it was scarce around Gridley. So Dave went to Eureka, where his brothers Walter and Emerson lived, and found work there. He worked in Eureka the winter of 1950-51 and into the spring. Then I went over to see if we could find a house and move our family there. We looked at several, but we hadn’t decided on one when I had to go back to Gridley. When school was out, we knew we would have to make a decision on a house and we finally bought one located at 4217 Little Fairfield St in Eureka.

The children said their farewells again to many friends they had made and we picked up after selling our house in Gridley and made another move. We all liked Eureka, except for the undependable weather. Adjusting wasn’t too hard as Dave had been there for over six months and he knew the people in the branch quite well. We also had relatives there for the children to enjoy.

Before we left Gridley, we had received word that David’s body was being sent home and we could plan a funeral. After we moved, we notified the Army and shortly after we had settled in Eureka, David’s body arrived. We moved in July of 1950 and David’s body came just a few weeks after. His body was escorted by a very nice military escort. We had a lovely funeral and because we didn’t know too many people we hadn’t expected many to attend, but there was a nice group of people there. The main speaker was Lowell Thompson, who has proven to be a life-long friend ever since we met him in Eureka.

David was buried in a lovely cemetery (Ocean View Cemetery) with full military rites. The cemetery was not far from our home in Eureka. There was a lovely view of the ocean from his plot and it was a restful place.

In August, we were attending MIA as usual and enjoyed the activities that it offered. The branch usually had a dance after class time each week. This one Tuesday evening in August Dave and I had danced a fast member. I was a little out of a breath when we finished, but nothing too unusual. I felt tired as I had worked hard that day and we decided to leave MIA early. When I got to the car I was having pains in my chest and by the time the family got there the pain was getting quite severe and spreading down my left arm. I told Dave that we had better hurry and get home as I didn’t feel at all well. I frightened Dave and he drove as fast as he dared. On the way home we passed the General Hospital and the pain was getting so bad that I could hardly stand it. Dave decided we had better stop at the hospital and find out what the trouble was. When we got there he jumped out of the car and came over to my side and opened the door to help me. He reached for me and I remember saying “Oh, Dave, I’m gone!” Then everything went black. I went limp and slipped right through Dave’s arms and skinned my knees on the gravel. In the meantime, Dave sent Marjorie and Hugh into the hospital for help. They were so excited that the attendants couldn’t understand them so they just followed the kids out to the parking lot. They got me into the hospital and into bed and contacted the doctors.

Dave called the chapel and President Walter Bingham, the Branch President came and took the children home. The doctors told Dave that I had had a heart attack, a coronary thrombosis. They also told him that the first crises would pass in 24 hours. I was in an oxygen tent. If I survived the first 24 hours, the next crises would be 72 hours. If I passed that I would probably survive.

An unusual dream came to me during this crucial time. I dreamed I saw my mother in an old-time buggy. She seemed to be very happy and was going someplace singing. I didn’t know just where it was she was going, but she was singing. I wanted very much to go with her and held out my arms to her. She told me that I wasn’t ready to come and that I was needed at home. I remember being very disappointed because I had to stay behind. Shortly after this dream I passed the 72 hour crises and was on my way to recovery.

Ralph and Clayton had been working in Montana at the time of this attack, and I asked Dave not to send for them, but of course he did. They came home as fast as they could. Dave also contacted my sister Melva and she came up for a few days to help out at home. Elder Delbert L. Stapley was in Eureka attending a district conference while I was still in the hospital so Dave arranged for him to come and give me a blessing. I appreciated this very much.

The Relief Society helped out at home very much, although Marjorie took over the major portion of the work and cooking. Ralph liked to tease her by saying that he lost over 7 pounds with her cooking. While I was in the hospital, which was over six weeks, Marjorie also had to buy Grant’s school clothes. She did a fine job except she didn’t allow for him to grow. By the time school was half over they were all too small and we had to get him some more.

When the time came for me to come home from the hospital the doctors wanted someone to be there with me and to help with the work and worry. So we made arrangements for Grace to come and stay with us and help me. She came from Virginia where they were stationed. Soon after she came with her two little girls, Don was given an overseas assignment, but he was unable to take his family with him right at first, so Grace and the girls stayed there in Eureka with us. After I was back on my feet a little, Grace and the girls decided to find an apartment and she went to work as a waitress in a local drive-in.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

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History: Lillian Alcorn

Grant had a little red wagon and a cute little puppy dog. One day he put his puppy into the wagon and went for a walk. He was about three years old or so and he walked with a pretty steady gait. When I missed him, I began to look for him and soon many of the neighbors were helping me. I finally found him about two blocks away in front of the Nazarene Church sitting on the steps. I gave him a good scolding and switched his little bottom a time or two and told him that he mustn’t go off like that again with his wagon and puppy! A few days later, Grant came running into the house and said, “Mommy, I went for a walk, but I didn’t take my puppy and wagon!”

Another amusing story about Dave happened here in El Monte. The ward had asked him to be a helper for Santa Clause at the ward Christmas party. The children happened to be around when they brought him the suit and were quite proud to tell their friends that they knew who was going to be Santa Clause at the party. The night of the party came and the children lined up to talk to Santa, when Marjorie got up to him she had the most astonished look on her face  and as she walked away she said, “that must be the real Santa, because it isn’t my Dad!” We had asked our good old neighbor, Mr. Hester to take Dave’s place.

In August of 1946, Grace was expecting her first baby and of course our first grandchild. We were very excited and anxious about the event. When her time came, they were unable to get in touch with her regular doctor and finally after she got to the hospital and was delivered, they discovered that the little boy had tried to inhale before birth and his little lungs were so congested that he had to gasp for every breath. They worked with him for fifteen hours but to no avail, he died. It was a terrible shock to all of us as we were all looking forward so much to the baby. Grace and Don were very upset about it as they had wanted a baby for a long time. He was named Donald Eugene Smith, Jr.

Our oldest son, David was about 17 years old now and really enjoyed going to dances and having good times. He was a very good dancer and was well liked by his friends. David became unhappy with school and was mixed up about a lot of things. He disappointed us when he decided to quit school and join the Navy, but we have to learn to accept the things which come. We had wanted him to finish his schooling and all, but he didn’t want to. He was stationed in San Diego, California.

Dave went to work for Fadel Construction Co., building a flying bomb base up in the San Gabriel Canyon. He worked for them for quite a while. While working for Fadel we received word that Dad Rowley had died, this was in 1948 (14 March). Dave prepared to attend his funeral in Montana. We decided not to take the family and when Dave got to Harlem he was sorry we all hadn’t gone with him as most of the other members of his family had brought their families.

There was a lot of violence and crime in the big city and so many influences that were not good for the children, that we decided it might be best if we looked for a smaller community to raise our family. We put our place up for sale and when it sold we prepared to leave for Gridley, California. We bid our friends goodbye and moved as soon as school was out.

We stayed with my Aunt Jeannette for a couple of weeks while we looked for a place we could buy. After about two weeks we bought the Melissa Clements home just off the Colusa road on Grace Ave. it was about three miles from town. It was much more of the kind of environment that we desired for our children. We made the move with six of our living eight children. David was in the Navy and Grace and Don were also in the Navy.

We sought out the LDS chapel, one of the first things, and enjoyed becoming acquainted with the good members in Gridley. The summer we got there, we were at a loss as to getting an income coming into the home, so Dave took the children and started to pick fruit. They would get up real early in the morning and work until afternoon. They picked peaches, prunes and other varieties. One day, just before school started, Hugh, who was only about 9 years old, climbed a tree to pick some fruit. He lost his footing and fell. He grabbed for another branch as he fell, but it was rotten and it gave away with him. He broke his arm and started school with his arm in a cast.

On Thanksgiving Day, 1948 Marjorie complained of a sore throat. The next day we took her to the doctor and he told us that she had diphtheria. There was only one other case in the whole town and we didn’t know the person involved. The family was put in quarantine for about three months. Dave lived with a neighbor during this time because he had to continue working. Most of the children were with us except for David, who had been discharged from the Navy. He stayed with another neighbor and went to school. We spent Christmas without daddy that year. Dave did come to the door and watch the children open gifts and play with some of them, but didn’t dare come in. Before we could get rid of the bug, both Marjorie and Hugh had to have their tonsils out.

In June of 1949 Grace and Don did have the baby they had waited so long for. It was a lovely little girl. Shortly after that, Don was discharged from the Navy and they came to Gridley to live. They named the baby, which was a girl, Cheryl Jeanette. Don couldn’t seem to adjust to the life of a civilian and he reenlisted in the Army. The Army afforded more time for his family than did the Navy. Just before this time, our son David also enlisted in the Army.

David was sent to Japan in 1949, and was there close to when the Korean conflict started in 1950. He was sent to Korea and we received word that he was missing in action as of 16 July 1950. We were very upset about this report and anxious for him to be found. We didn’t hear any more from the Army until December. In the meantime, another soldier had been reported missing whose family was Catholic. Their beliefs of the life after death were so much different than ours, that it was a real testimony to the family and myself when we saw how distraught this other family was. As far as they knew this was it, the end. But we knew that someday we could see our son again. We received word in December that David had been killed and as soon as they could they would send his body home. We were all saddened by David’s death but we would prefer that to his being a prisoner and going through some of the experiences that we had heard that our prisoner were going through.

The children all enjoyed school in Gridley. Grant started kindergarten in Gridley the last year we were there, in the fall of 1950. The children all learned to like Gridley and had many friends and enjoyed their associations. Hugh had a paper route part of the time we were there, and Clayton worked on a dairy farm for a neighbor. We were able to have a garden here and I enjoyed that very much. I also had some chickens here and it just seemed more like home.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

The children got back into school and were adjusting quite well, however it did seem rather hot for February. The elementary school was about three blocks away and the high school was about four blocks in the opposite direction. Both were good schools.

Grant seemed to still have his bad spells of breathing difficulty. It seemed to be worse when he ate certain foods. Then one day we left him with Leonard’s girls to tend for a few hours and they fed him a lot of cookies and other things. That night he had a terrible spell and we were up most of the night. We thought sure we would lose him this time. So the next morning we called a Dr. Hamilton in Pasadena. He was supposed to be one of the best baby specialists in the area. When Dave  called for an appointment he was told that the doctor was filled up for three months. Dave told them that that wouldn’t do us any good as our baby wouldn’t live that long. The doctor then told us to bring him over at closing time and he would take care of him. The doctor didn’t think he could possibly have asthma, but after examining Grant he decided that he really did have asthma and a serious case, too. He made an appointment for us to take Grant to Helen James, who was to give him a number of tests for allergy. We kept the appointment and she pricked the skin on Grant’s little back with some kind of needle and then put a drop of liquid on the spot. She did this in about 200 places. It was surely hard to stand back and watch him being hurt and crying so hard. We took him back the next day for the results and we found that he was allergic to wheat, potatoes and beef. We then took him back to Dr. Hamilton and he gave us a prescription to help him whenever he began to get stuffed up. We also discovered that oranges would help him over his spells, so we would give him all he would eat.

We hadn’t been in El Monte very long when Grace became quite interested in the boy next door. His name was Donald Eugene Smith, and he was in the Navy. They became very good friends and then one day in June they came to see us and talk to us about getting married. They were both so young that we didn’t feel they were ready for marriage or prepared to face the problems of married life yet. We told them that they should think it over very carefully first and study each other to see if they could get along. After all, they were the ones who would have to live with each other. They did decide to wait a while before making any final decisions, but they didn’t wait very long. They approached us again in July and still felt that they wanted to get married, so we agreed to let them become man and wife. Arrangements were made for a 4 August 1945 wedding. The bishop of the ward, Fred S. Batch performed the ceremony in his own home and then the young couple was honored at a reception in the home of Don’s parents (Joe Ben Smith and Coral Lorraine Bolton)*. They then moved to San Pedro where Don was stationed with the Navy.

*Joe was married to Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder and Coral was married to John Joseph Everhard at the time, not sure which home the reception

It was surely hard to see Grace go out on her own as she had been so much help to me in the home and with the younger children. She was a very good little housekeeper. I now began to realize just how much help Grace had been all through the years. She was so faithful and responsible.

Both Dave and I worked in the ward and had several different positions. I soon began to realize that we had to spend more time with the family to teach them the things they should know and I tried to do this. But I still worked in the Relief Society and the MIA. Dave taught the Sunday School class that Douglas and Ralph were in. He also was a Genealogical Committeeman as well as working with the Welfare program and Elder’s Quorum Presidency. So you see we were kept pretty busy.

Dave had found work with the U.S Rubber Co. for the first six months we were in El Monte as a bagger of tires. When summer came he began to take on other jobs to help with the expenses of a large family. We had been used to raising much of our food and now we were in the position of having to buy most of it.

It was hard to keep the children occupied too. They were used to farm life and having the run of the farm. But in the city there was so much mischief to get into when they weren’t in school. They did find enjoyment in going to the school grounds and playing ball which helped fill much of their time and was surely a big help to us in their management.

In June, Dave quit U.S. Rubber and went to doing carpenter work around the neighborhood. Then he went down and joined the Carpenter’s Union and they sent him out on jobs and he kept pretty busy and made $1.35 an hour which was pretty good in 1945.

One day the school called me and told me that Douglas was having a lot of difficulty seeing well enough to read. They recommended that we have a special eye operation, which at the time we didn’t have money for. Soon after, the President of the El Mote Lion’s Club came to see us. They wanted to sponsor the money for the operation from a special fund they had for things of this kind. We were told we could pay them back as we were able, so we agreed and an appointment was made for us at the Eye Clinic down in Los Angeles. Dave had to work, so I took Douglas down to the clinic for the surgery. They said the muscles in the back of his eyes needed adjusting. They had to remove his eye and adjust the muscles and then put it back in place. After that it was necessary to take eye exercises for months to get the muscles adjusted to working together. We had had some warning that there was something wrong with Doug’s eyes while we were living in Montana. We had purchased glasses for him there. One day Douglas came home from school in Harlem without his glasses, which had cost about $20.00. When we questioned him about them, he told us he had sold them to a playmate for a nickel. We had quite a time getting them back as the boy’s father said that a deal is a deal. But finally he consented to let us buy them back.

We had a wonderful group of friends in El Monte and we used to do quite a few things together. We would go to parties, movies and enjoyed being together. We were all members of the Church and attended Church functions as a group, too. There had been several surprise birthday parties given within the group and Dave said one time that it would take a lot of doing to surprise him. So the gang decided to put it to the test and they planned a surprise birthday party for him. We were going to have a get together on Dave’s birthday anyway and go to the Deardens’ home to make donuts and play games. What Dave didn’t know was that they were coming to our place first to surprise him. They all parked their cars around the corner and came quietly into the house. One of the ladies came in first and asked where Dave was and I told her he was in the bedroom, but to be careful that he might be dressing. Well she didn’t hear the last part of my sentence and the whole group, led by several ladies barged into the bedroom with a big “SURPRISE.” I believe they were as surprised as Dave was because he was just putting on his trousers and they were all very embarrassed. We had many good laughs about it later.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

It is at times like these that we truly appreciate our friends and loved ones. The comfort they can give to us is good for the soul. We usually take these loved ones and friends for granted and sort of expect them to do certain things, but when we have tragedy come to us they seem to go the extra mile to help us adjust to the problems, and they don’t seem quite as bad as they might otherwise.

It was surely lonely after Sharon was taken away. It seemed to leave a vacancy in our lives that nothing would ever fill. But it seems that time heals all wounds and that many other blessings come and soon such terrible heartaches drift into the background of life and the present becomes more real than the past.

As time went on we decided that we needed an outside entrance into our basement, so Dave proceeded to fix one. At this same time he was able to purchase a used coal furnace for $15 that had been taken out of another house to be replaced with a gas furnace. It was a good furnace and we appreciated it very much. We installed it in the basement with a big register cut into the floor of the living room upstairs. It was so good in the winter as we wouldn’t have to touch it all day long after it had been stoked and banked in the morning. It kept the house warm all day and way into the night. We would take care of it night and morning.

While we were working in the basement, Dave also fixed a large fruit room and a large coal storage bin as well as sleeping facilities for the boys. We set up a washing area in the basement for me, too. So we were quite comfortable in our home. Things take time, but we were accomplishing our goals little by little.

I had been told by doctors that it would be unwise for me to have another baby but my arms ached for a tiny one to fill them, since the loss of Sharon. So against the advice of the doctors, I found myself once again with child. I didn’t have a hard time carrying the baby until the last while. Two weeks before I was to have the baby the doctor put me in the hospital in Havre. I had toxemia and high blood pressure.

On the way to the hospital I had a very strange experience. Of course with my five boys and two girls I was hoping for another girl. In fact all the family were crossing their fingers for a girl, that is except for Clayton. He wanted another brother. Well, as we were driving to Havre, I was saying a silent prayer that My Heavenly Father would grant our desires. As I was praying to myself, a voice said to me as plain as anything could be, “you will have another beautiful boy.” It was such a real thing that I no longer desired a little girl and put my mind at rest knowing I was going to bear a son.

On 26 June 1944 the baby was born and it was a beautiful healthy boy. We named him Grant Alcorn Rowley. I remember that when we called a neighbor on the phone to let the family know, Clayton kept saying, “I told you it would be another boy.” But all the family was thankful it was over and that we had a sweet baby to fill the vacancy left by our lovely Sharon.

Grant was only about four months old when the doctor told us that he also had an allergy and asthma and that if we wanted to save him, we would have to move to a warm, dry climate. So we tentatively decided to rent our farm and sell our stock and equipment and move to Mesa, Arizona.

We had an auction sale for our farm equipment and stock on 16 December 1944 and then prepared to leave when we received a letter from my brother Leonard Alcorn. He lived in El Monte, California. He said that it was hot and dry down there and if we would come there, he would rent us a house and have a job waiting for Dave. So we decided to go to El Monte, California and we rented the farm to Harold Morris and left Harlem in January of 1945.

My Dad had his big truck, so he consented to help us move our belongings. We put our furniture and all our earthly possessions into his big van and Dave fixed a little camper-style back onto a pickup for the boys to ride in and off we went. We stopped along the way to visit relatives and so it took us several days to make the trip. Dave found some big rocks that we would heat and put into the camper to help keep the boys warm until we got out of the cold country.

The first night we stopped at Dillon, Montana where we rented a couple of rooms in a motel. But poor little Grant got asthma so bad, that we thought we were going to lose him there. We were up with him most all night. We left there very early the next morning. It was 20° below zero that morning as we left Dillon. It gradually got warmer the farther south we came.

The next day we went from the cold north to the town where Dave was born, Shelley, Idaho. His Aunt Annie Robinson lived there, and she was gracious and hospitable and prepared beds for us with her that night. We also visited with Dave’s uncle Royal James Rowley where our little son, Hugh, kept us all in stitches with his entertaining stories and jokes.

Our next stop was Brigham City, Utah where we stopped with my Uncle Albert and Aunt Dollie Weaver and enjoyed a visit with some of the Weavers who lived in the area. We spent the night there in Brigham City and then drove on the next day until we arrived in Utah’s Dixieland in Cedar City. We spent the night there with Dave’s Mothers sister, Aunt Hannah Foster. We enjoyed ourselves a lot in such a reunion. I had never met them, and Dave hadn’t seen them since he was about seven years old, so we talked until late hours and really enjoyed ourselves.

We arrived on Garvey Blvd. in El Monte, California about three o’clock in the afternoon on a February day in 1945. We called Leonard right away and he told us that the people who had been living in the house we were supposed to rent had scarlet fever and couldn’t move out. But he had made arrangements for us to move in with some friends until we could rent or buy a house. This proved to be quite a problem. There just didn’t seem to be any homes for rent in the area at all. There were quite a few places for sale, but they required larger down payments than we could give. We would look early in the morning and late in the evening trying to find something. It took us about two weeks before we found one we could even buy with our small down payment.

We did finally find a house that an older couple had built. It wasn’t very well constructed, but it was within our financial reach, so we decided to make the purchase. We signed the contract and made preparations to move in. We had agreed to let the older couple live in one of the rooms of the house for a month. The house was located at 237 S. Meeker Rd. between Garvey and Valley Blvd’s. The house had cement floors and our poor little Grant seemed to get a lot of hard knocks. Every time I turned around he seemed to be falling off something or other; the couch, his high chair or something. The floors were all so uneven and the walls were of insulations board. The ward there met in the Carpenter’s Union Hall about a mile or two away and the family was certainly glad to get going to Church again. The ward was quite different from the small branch we had known in Montana all our lives.

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

My only sister Melva was married in 1940 to Robert L. Goe. They were living in Salt Lake City, Utah. In May 1941, I took Marjorie and went to Utah to be with Melva when her first baby was to be born. My brother Leonard drove us in his car to Salt Lake City. Melva’s baby was born 30 May 1941 and was a lovely little girl which they named Karen. Marjorie and I returned after three weeks, on the bus. While we were gone, Grace, who was only 12 years old, took complete charge of the house and prepared the meals for all those boys. She even bottled several quarts of seedless grapes, which by the way, stayed good for years.

About this time the Branch decided to build a new chapel. A plot of ground was selected in town and the work began. It was completed and we moved into a lovely new white chapel. It was good to have more room for classes and a Relief Society room with kitchen facilities. It was good indeed and we certainly appreciated the new building.

We had an old log ice-house on our place and we would get big blocks of ice from the river every winter and fill the ice-house. It would last long into the summer months.

I gave birth to another baby on 14 May 1942. It was a lovely red-haired little girl. She was the first baby I had that was born in a hospital. We named her Sharon Lee Rowley. She was very quiet, sweet and loveable baby and was a real joy to us. This precious baby was not to be ours for very long, at least in mortality. She was a frail baby and we soon learned that she had asthma.

One Sunday morning, 27 September 1942 while Dave and the boys were doing chores, Sharon had a bad choking spell. She couldn’t seem to breath nor stop coughing and choking. I sent Grace after Dave and he sent one of the boys across the ditch for Francis. Dave and Francis got to the house about the same time. By this time, Sharon had from all appearances stopped breathing. Dave took her and I got the consecrated oil and he and Francis administered to her. She still seemed lifeless and Dave began to work her left arm up and down similar to working a pump handle. Within a minute or so she started breathing again and we rejoiced and thanked our Father in Heaven for his blessings to us and for the power of the priesthood which was in our home.

The next day we took Sharon to the hospital in Havre, about 40 miles from Harlem. I was allowed to stay right there with her. Although Sharon had always been a quiet baby and hadn’t smiled much in her short life, she seemed to smile and be quite content there in the hospital. Then on Wednesday, 30 September 1942 in the late afternoon, Dave and I were standing by her crib and she talked, cooed and smiled and seemed to be trying to tell us that this is the way things were supposed to be. She died about 5:00 p.m. that evening. It was a great loss to me and the family. A close friend at the time gave us the following poem in which we found much comfort.

-A PRAYER-

O Father, help me to understand and know the reason why,
The Child that Thou dids’t give to me so early had to die.
Why one who’s life had been so pure, who never knew deceit
Should droop and wither like a flower crushed under ruthless feet.

O Father, help me to understand Thy purpose divine,
In letting death, with ruthless hand, tear her dear heart from mine.
O, let me see the veil beyond where dwells her spirit pure,
And l know she is happy where she had gone, O let me feel secure.

Forgive the surging doubts that rise within my aching heart,
And take the dimness from mine eyes, let darkness all depart.
Let light and knowledge come to me from Heaven, Thy home on high.
O, help me put my trust in Thee, O Father, tell me why!

Perhaps I sin in asking this, more faith should show in thee,
But, Oh I miss her loving kiss, she was so dear to me.
Just let me know that I sometime shall find her once again,
And clasp again her form to me, I as in Jesus’ name, Amen!

-AN ANSWER-

Grieve not, my daughter, for time shall be when death shall be no more,
Thy loved one I’ll return to thee to cherish evermore.
“Twas in the plan that man should die and slumber in the grave,
But rise again as even I, for this my life I gave.

For mortal life is but a part of God’s eternity.
In which the souls of men embark to find felicity.
What men call death is but a step from low to higher plane.
And all who in the dust have slept, though me, shall live again.

Then grieve not for the one that’s gone, let your heart despair,
For God in wisdom called your child to work for Him up there.
The prison gates to open wide for those who died in sin,
And through repentance them to guide, again to worship him.

Let this, then be your answer why, and let your heart rejoice,
for until God they do not die who to His voice.
But walk with Him is realms of love where all the righteous be,
be comforted, for there above, Thy child shall welcome thee!

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

Dave made arrangements to have Dr. Hoone of Chinook to take care of me and the baby. I went to see the doctor several times during the period of pregnancy. He was there when the baby was born on 20 September 1928. It was a beautiful baby girl, healthy and perfectly formed. We were surely thankful to our Heavenly Father for such a blessing and three weeks later Dave blessed her and gave her the name of Grace Harriet Rowley in honor of both her Grandmothers. Grace after Dave’s mother and Harriet  after my mother. She was such a beautiful child and we were proud and were always glad to show her off. I sewed most all of her clothes and she was always very daintily dressed. I think her grandparents were almost as proud of her as we were so she was pretty well taken care of and when I had her out in company someone had her most of the time.

The farm work was hard and oft times required long hours away from home for Dave. I had to spend much of my time alone with the baby and Dave’s parents. My own folks lived only across the road and I saw them quite often, but it still meant many lonely hours alone with little Grace. I certainly looked forward to evening when Dave would come in from the fields to be with us. I kept busy, though, and that helped to pass the time more quickly. The baby took a lot of care and her bath time was always a fun part of the day for both of us.

During the next year the time passed more speedily, but in another eleven months and seven days we were blessed again. This time Dave made arrangements with Doctor McConnell at Harlem to take care of us. But when Dad Rowley went after him, he couldn’t find him anyplace in town so Dave sent for Sister Southwick and she and Dave took care of me and the baby. We learned later that the doctor was found playing cards in the basement of the New England Hotel.

The baby was born 27 August 1929 in Harlem and was a very lovely little boy. He was blessed and given the name of David Alcorn Rowley after Dave and using my maiden name. This was wonderful, now we had a beautiful little girl and a wonderful little boy. We were very happy and enjoyed our little family very much. We lived in a small two-room frame home with a small storage cellar underneath. We had a nice large garden spot surrounding the house where we raised much of our livelihood, vegetables and some fruit.

The Branch Chapel was about 200 feet from our door, so it wasn’t too difficult to get the family to and from the Church meetings.

In the spring of 1930 Dave rented the Victor Bottomly place. It was straight north on the highway. It wasn’t a very good place, but we were getting to ourselves. It was a wonderful venture for us as we had always lived with or very near some of the folks, either Dave’s folks or mine. It was wonderful to be to ourselves.

We had a few cows, chickens, pigs and horses and some machinery so we felt we had a pretty good start and we really worked hard. The children were such an inspiration to us and because of them we wanted very much to make good. Dave again worked long days in the field much of the time it was before daylight when he left the house and after dark when he would come home.

It was while living here on the Bottomly place that I lost a baby because of miscarriage, which made us both very unhappy. I was confined to bed for a while but before long I was blessed to be up and around again. I needed to be up, with two small children to care for.

Shortly after this we with another family, the Hammers, from our Branch decided to take a vacation and go to Cardston, Alberta, Canada to the temple and have our marriage sealed for time and all eternity. It had long been our desire to alter our wedding vows from “until death we do part” to “for time and all eternity.”

And that the two lovely gifts our Heavenly Father should be ours forever. So on 24 September 1930 we were sealed and Grace and David were sealed to us. Now all the children we would have would be born under the covenant. This great opportunity and blessing was one of the greatest sources of joy and security, knowing that from now on through all eternity we would never be parted, really parted as long as we lived the way we should. We would remain as a family group, tied under the bonds of the eternal covenant of marriage as it was instituted in the beginning.

We both received our Patriarchal blessings by Patriarch John F. Anderson while we were there. He blessed me that I should grow in faith, wisdom and the knowledge of the Gospel and that I would receive the spiritual food that would nourish and strengthen my soul. My calling was to be an honorable wife and mother in Israel and to honor the priesthood and become a wise counselor among my sex and that my testimony would grow and prove of great value unto mankind. I was also told that my lineage is of the tribe of Joseph through Ephraim. I was told that through my diligence I should grow to be much use in my redemption of the living and the dead and through the exercise of faith I would be able to conquer the powers that were seeking my destruction and blessings of strength would be mine if I endured to the end. I would become familiar with the whisperings of the Holy Ghost. I must be quick to discern good from evil and be able to enjoy the promptings of the Spirit and I would be gifted with dreams and presentments. These and many other blessings he bestowed upon me in my patriarchal blessing for which I’ll always be thankful. Sometime after we came back from the Temple, during one night I had a dream that I was going up a flight of stairs and when I reached the top of these stairs I fell. I could see my body lying on the floor and I seemed to linger there for a while. I saw people gather around my body and they seemed to be trying to help me.[1]

We lived on the Bottomly place about a mile and a half from the church and about three miles west of Harlem, on the Highway.  Part of our beets were frozen in that fall and we didn’t do so well financially. We also lost all of our horses because they got into the garbage and ate some poisoned cats. But we had a lot of good experiences and really enjoyed that year alone. The following spring we rented the Emma Merrill place, a quarter of a mile east and a mile south. The Merrill place was about half a section and the buildings were on the banks of an old dead river. The men and boys would swim in the evenings after the day’s work was done. We enjoyed our family life very much.

[1] This was later fulfilled thirty years later at the time of her death

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father

History: Lillian Alcorn

Dave went back out to the Morrison and Butler Ranch to help put up hay, irrigate and break horses. He stayed there until harvest started then he came back to help his folks harvest the crops and didn’t go back out to the Butler ranch. Dave and I started to go steady and we went most everywhere together. We both loved to dance and spent many enjoyable evenings dancing at Church socials. The winter passed fast. In the spring of 1927 Dad bought the old Sam Taylor farm three miles west of Harlem on the banks of the Milk River. It had an old log house on it with a dirt roof. It was a hard house to keep clean as the dirt kept sifting down through the roof.

In March 1927, Dave and I went to a dance at the Agency and on the way home Dave proposed to me. This marriage proposal was a little different from the usual. Dave said that he thought we could be married in March, but he had to pay his tithing and he didn’t have enough money left. But we did set the date and were married 14 July 1927.

Dave’s dad and my dad drove to Chinook with us to the home of President Wallace Peterson of the Chinook Branch where we were married by the law of the land. As we were leaving Brother Peterson’s home we backed out of the door so we could tell people we had backed out and came home. There was a big social at the Harlem Branch Chapel that night so each of us went to our own homes that night as we would not be shivered. Bert Murphy was going to broadcast the news, but Dave got hold of him and stopped him from doing it. At the social, which was a farewell party for Will Southwick, I sang the song “I Wish I had Someone to Love Me,” in pig-latin. Not many understood it, but they all seemed to enjoy it. The following night was MIA and the young people had a good time trying to shiveree[1] us a little. They pushed me around in a wheelbarrow for a while and were going to separate us and take us different places but Dave put a stop to that.

Well, we moved into a little two-room log cabin with Dave’s brother Francis and his wife. Francis and Erma lived in one room and Dave and I in the other room. We lived there the first summer we were married. Dave and Francis had rented this place from the Indian Reservation there. It was all dry farm and mostly meadow hay or wild hay. They broke a lot of meadow and planted grain and corn. They also raised a lot of cattle.

Dave and I wanted to get a place of our own so when in the fall of 1927 we heard that the Lee Morgan ranch was up in Paradise Valley and that it had been taken over by the Harlem Bank and put up for sale, we considered it. A friend of ours, Wren Stoddard who had told us about it came out to our place and  he and Dave got in Wren’s car and went right up to look it over. That night we prayed about it and Dave had a strange dream. In it he had been wrestling with Leo Morgan. He could throw Lee, but couldn’t get away from him at all. The next morning we talked it over and decided not to buy the farm. Dave went over to his dad’s place and told his folks and Francis that we weren’t going to buy it and Francis said that if Dave and I wouldn’t buy the Morgan place, he was going to buy it. So in the spring of 1928 Francis bought the placed and Dave signed the note with him. This later proved to be a big mistake for us. Well, anyway Dave and I stayed and helped his father operate his place for the next two years.

Dave and Wren Stoddard hauled coal in the winter from the Hebbleman Mine about 10 miles southwest of where we lived. They would haul it into town and sell it. They usually left before daylight and got back home about noon. Then they would take it into town and unload it and get back for the evening chores. One morning when they left the stars were shining brightly and the sky was very clear, but about seven or eight am a bad blizzard started and kept getting worse and worse. As the day proceeded you couldn’t see but a few feet in front of you. This lasted most of the day but began to clear off just before sundown. They got home about an hour after sundown. Needless to say, Mary and I were mighty concerned. Wren and Mary Stoddard were some of our closest friends.

The winters were very severe and oft times the temperature went down to 40˚ below and would stay that way for several nights and would rise only a little in the daytime. Most of the time when it was really cold the air would be quiet but there were times when the wind would blow fiercely and sometimes to gale proportions. This would pile up the snow in great drifts and make it almost impossible to go anywhere for a while. But we always had plenty of wood or coal and would keep the house warm. It was so dreary on these cold windy days with the windows making such a tumult of noise and draft. It made one really feel how small and helpless men are in the face of the elements; and how much we depend on our Father in Heaven for our well-being and protection. How little we appreciate the many blessings we have from day to day.

When Dave and I were first married we made several resolves. One was that we would always try and express our appreciation to our Heavenly Father for our many blessings. At times we weren’t as faithful in this as we should have been but we did try. Another resolve we made was that there would never be any foul language, talk or jokes that wouldn’t be fit for anyone else to hear used in our home. We both worked in the Church. I was still an MIA Counselor and Sunday School Teacher. Dave was the Boy Scout leader and an MIA Counselor and a Sunday School Teacher. Dave was ordained an Elder by John G. Allred n on 7 August 1927.

I always enjoyed Church and the inspiration it gave me to better living; even the messages from Sunday to Sunday, the Inspiration to do better. The joy one gets out of living and abiding by the principles of the Gospel, the satisfaction of realizing you’ve done something to help someone else. I love the gospel and all it has done for me to help me understand a better way of life. The many things I have to be thankful for and I pray that I’ll always be able to live so that I’ll be worthy of all these many blessings.

By April 1928, I knew our home was going to be blessed with one of the greatest blessings anyone could pray for. We were going to have a baby. We were both overjoyed and we began to plan. Along with the housework, I then prepared for the addition to our family. It gave me so much joy and happiness to know that we were going to have such a great blessing and the months seemed to drag by. It seemed as though September would never get here. I spent much of this waiting alone as Dave worked long hours in the fields and took care of a lot of stock and raised a fine garden.

[1] a mock serenade with kettles, pans, horns, and other noisemakers given for a newly married couple

To be continued…

Aleene Sumsion – Daughter-in-Law: Son Ralph’s (34) wife
Archie Harold Alcorn 97) – Brother
Bert Lund Murphy – Brother-in-Law: Sister-in-Law Verda’s (88) husband
Cheryl Jeanette Smith (12) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Clark Alcorn (91) – Father
Clayton Alcorn Rowley (35) – Son
Coral Lorraine Bolton (28) – Son-in-Law’s Mother: Donald’s (9) mother
David Alcorn Rowley (32) – Son
David Lenn Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
David William Rowley (30) – Husband
Deon Eugene Judkins – Grandson: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) son
Dollie Cook – Wife of Maternal Uncle: James Jr’s (228) wife
Donald Eugene Smith (9) – Son-in-Law: Daughter Grace’s (10) husband
Donald Eugene Smith Jr (11) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Donna Diane Smith (13) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Douglas Alcorn Rowley (33) – Son
Dwain Eugene Judkins –  Son-in-Law: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) husband
Dwana Kay Judkins – Granddaughter: Daughter Marjorie’s (36) daughter
Emerson Adis Rowley (89) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Erma Thornton – Sister-in-Law: Brother-in-Law Emerson’s (89) wife
Fannie Marie Weaver (Aunt Fannie) (229) – Maternal Aunt: Mother Harriet’s (92) sister
Grace Davis (86) – Mother-in-Law
Grace Harriet Rowley (10) – Daughter
Grant Alcorn Rowley (39) – Son
Hannah Davis (210) – Husband’s Maternal Aunt: Mother-in-Law Grace’s (86) sister
Harriet Ann Weaver (92) – Mother
Hugh Alcorn Rowley (37) – Son
Hugh Francis Rowley (87) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
Hugh Thompson Rowley (85) – Father-in-Law
James Albert Weaver Jr (228) – Maternal Uncle: Mother Harriet’s (92) brother
James Sheldon Nelson Sr – Wife of Maternal Aunt: Fannie’s (229) husband
Jesse Verl Alcorn (99) – Brother
Joe Ben Smith (27) – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) father
John Joseph Everhard – Son-in-Law’s: Donald’s (9) stepfather
Joseph Lorenzo Alcorn (96) – Brother
Karen Andrea Goe – Niece: Maternal Aunt Melva’s (98) daughter
Kurtis Wayne Rowley – Grandson: Son Ralph’s (34) son
Leonard Clark Alcorn (93) – Brother
Lillian Alcorn (31) – Self
Lillian Lorraine Smith (3) – Granddaughter: Daughter Grace’s (10) daughter
Margaret Jeanette Alcorn (224) – Paternal Aunt: Father Clark ‘s (91) sister
Marjorie Ann Rowley (36) – Daughter
Marjorie Elizabeth Snyder – Son-in-Law’s Stepmother: Donald’s (9) stepmother
Marvin Ballard Alcorn (95) – Brother
Mary Catherine Hammons (218) – Paternal Grandmother: Father Clark’s (91) mother
Mary Francis Alcorn – Cousin: Brother Archie’s (97) daughter
Mary Gregory Askins – Sister-in-Law: Brother Archie’s (97) wife
Melva Alcorn (98) – Sister
Myron Nelson – Cousin: Maternal Aunt Fannie’s (229) son
Pamela Rowley – Granddaughter: Son Douglas’ (33) daughter
Ralph Alcorn Rowley (34) – Son
Robert L. Goe – Brother-in-Law: Sister Melva’s (98) 1st husband
Ronald Steven Smith (14) – Grandson: Daughter Grace’s (10) son
Rosina Weaver (Aunt Rose) (469) – Mother Harriet’s (92) maternal aunt
Royal James Rowley (205) – Husband’s Paternal Uncle: Father-in-Law Hugh’s (85) brother
Scott Calvin Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
Sharon Lee Rowley (38) – Daughter
Verda May Rowley (88) – Sister-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) sister
Vonna Ensign – Daughter-in-Law: Son Douglas’ (33) wife
Walter Illith Rowley (90) – Brother-in-Law: Husband David’s (30) brother
William Douglas Rowley – Grandson: Son Douglas’ (33) son
William Vernon Alcorn (94) – Brother
William Weaver (457) – Maternal Great-Grandfather: Mother Harriet’s (92) father